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Lennon25

Classic Rock-n-Roll Screamers

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If this is a repeat, I apologize. I didn't get any hits when I searched for it so...

I heard 'Won't Get Fooled Again' last night and started thinking about this..

Who are the great screamers in rock-n-roll?

Here's a few of the obvious ones that came to mind...

Roger Daltrey

Jim Morrison

Ted Nugent

David Lee Roth

Pink Floyd had a good one on 'Careful With That Ax Eugene' too.

Anyone have any more or any favorites..?

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Good call on Paul, Ron. Also "Oh! Darling". John's scream at the start of "Revolution" is also pretty gnarly, but he lost it with that one in "I Want You (She's So Heavy") when his voice totally cracks.

Wow, "totally" and "gnarly" in the same sentence. Yikes.

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there is some confusion over the scream at the beginning of Revolution. I've always assumed it was John, but The Beatles did a "video" of Revolution (it was in The Anthology) and it seems to show Paul screaming at the beginning. I've even convinced myself that it sounds like Paul. Does anybody have the definitive answer (knowing that SF's has the smartest posters in the free world)...

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I don't remember that video (I have that set, so I'll have to re-watch it), but it still sounds like John to me. Bit it might very well be Paul. I'll have to give it a listen, since it's been awhile.

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Ian Gillan on Strange Kind Of Woman (for that matter on many of Deep Purple's tunes). James Brown and Klaus Meine of the Scorpions are pretty accomplished "screamers" as well.

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Although known for onstage theatrics and makeup, I'd like to mention Chuck Berry and Little Richard, who taught "dem white boys" how to scream! (Since this is a Classic board, and they fit the definition.) :afro:

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People already mentioned (maybe not the songs though ?)

Little Richard / Long Tall Sally, Good Golly Miss Molly, Ready Teddy, Etc.

James Brown / I Feel Good

David Lee Roth (Van Halen) / Jump

Jim Morrison / The End

Roger Daltrey (Who) /

................................................

Wilson Pickett was pretty good on his version of Hey Jude too !

How about Arthur Brown - Fire.

Edited by Guest
Going to listen to Beatles' songs !

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I was going to post "Helter Skelter" too... but I believe it´s Paul who screams there... (not the "I got blisters on my fingers", that´s Ringo...) Maybe you mean "Yer Blues", there we hear some Lennon screams... :smile:

Janis is the best screamer! :bow:

Edited by Guest

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Yes, it is Paul's song Edna. Now I'm not sure about "Twist And Shout" either. Maybe I mixed them up. I'm going to get out my Beatles Records/Tapes/Cds tomorrow. Right now I'm going to watch "LOST". See you later Kid.

:)

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there is some confusion over the scream at the beginning of Revolution. I've always assumed it was John, but The Beatles did a "video" of Revolution (it was in The Anthology) and it seems to show Paul screaming at the beginning. I've even convinced myself that it sounds like Paul. Does anybody have the definitive answer (knowing that SF's has the smartest posters in the free world)...

Here's another clue for you all, the screamer was Paul:

Revolution (song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Revolution (The Beatles))

"Revolution 1"

Song by The Beatles

From the album The Beatles

Album released 22 November 1968

Recorded 30 May 1968

Genre Rock

Song Length 4:17

Record label Apple Records

Producer George Martin

The Beatles Album Listing

Long, Long, Long (Track 7 of Disc 2) Revolution 1 (Track 8 of Disc 2) Honey Pie (Track 9 of Disc 2)

"Revolution" is a song by The Beatles. In a first for popular music, the song appeared in two distinctly different incarnations, a raucous electric version and a slowed-down acoustic version (titled "Revolution 1"). The song was written primarily by John Lennon and attributed to Lennon-McCartney.

John Lennon also created another recorded work, "Revolution 9", a sound collage which, apart from its title, is unrelated to the song "Revolution".

[edit]

Revolution

The first version of "Revolution" to be released comprised the B-side of the "Hey Jude" single, released in early September 1968.

A product of the recording sessions for The Beatles (aka The White Album), "Revolution" featured distorted guitars and an electric piano solo by session musician Nicky Hopkins. This track is one of the loudest and most aggressive Beatle songs; it begins abruptly with a loud, overdriven electric guitar chord and a wailing scream from McCartney. The musical form is a simple rock and roll chord progression, but the highly processed elements and hyperbolic approach distinguished the track from nearly anything that had come prior; the sound of "Revolution" is often cited as presaging both the heavy metal and grunge music genres. There is also a very noticeable tape edit as John Lennon first sings "well, you know."

The lyrics of the song can be interpreted as a cautionary response to the most extreme elements of the counter-culture movement of the era, as Lennon's verses express sympathy for, yet outline several limits to his support of political and social revolutionary action, in the most famous case rejecting violence:

We all want to change the world

But when you talk about destruction

Don't you know that you can count me out

"Revolution" later appeared on the 1970 Hey Jude compilation album and other compilations.

"Revolution" was the first Beatles recording, and indeed one of the first rock music recordings by any artist, to be licensed for use in a television commercial. (Ford Motor Company had used a cover version of "Help!" for a TV ad in 1985) Nike used the actual Beatles recording for a commercial in 1987, paying $250,000 for the rights to Capitol Records and Michael Jackson, who owned the publishing rights. This caused a huge backlash among Beatles fans, who felt John Lennon would have objected to this usage, especially in the face of controversy over Nike's use of overseas labor, which critics refer to as 'sweatshops.' Nike later released a television ad featuring the John Lennon song "Instant Karma," with the permission of Yoko Ono.

"Revolution 1" is the same song as "Revolution", but is performed in a distinctly different style: slower, with little distortion and more emphasis on acoustic instruments (though electric guitar remains a primary component of the track's sound).

"Revolution 1" was actually recorded before "Revolution" but released nearly three months later. Lennon wanted this initial version of the song to be released as a single, but the other band members said it wasn't "single speed", so Lennon insisted they record the faster version, which wound up backing "Hey Jude". The original version, re-titled "Revolution 1" to distinguish it from the later version, was released on The Beatles' 'White Album', The Beatles in late November 1968.

"Revolution 1" contains a notable lyrical difference to the final "Revolution": Lennon's vocal for the track adds the emphatic word "in" following the line "When you talk about destruction/ don't you know that you can count me out". Beatles' folklore is that Lennon was undecided about how he wanted to end the line and tried both variations.

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