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Rate the Last Movie You've Seen


Farin
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Sweeney Todd -- 9/10.

I could've done without Joanna and Antony or whatever his name was, but I don't think time has ever passed this quickly in the cinema! Usually I look at the time every fifteen minutes even if the movie's very interesting, but not this time. And musicals aren't normally my idea of fun either (there are exceptions of course), but I didn't mind it here.

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I rented 3:10 to Yuma this past weekend. I have not seen the original, so I was able to judge this movie on its own merits.

Even though I'm not a Russell Crowe fan, he does a good job of portraying Ben Wade,the ruthless, yet charming, leader of an outlaw gang. Christian Bale (he never gives a bad performance) is excellent as the conflicted Dan Evans, an ordinary man who behaves in an extrordinarily courageous manner in order to redeem himself in his family's eyes.

Although the plot is relatively predictable, the leads and a strong supporting cast including Peter Fonda and Ben Foster do a creditable job of elevating this movie to a level above the mundane.

While I don't agree with the critics who said this movie compares favourably with Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven", it makes me believe that the Hollywood western is not yet dead.

7/10

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"There Will Be Blood" 8/10

Daniel Day Lewis is possessed of a fine madness as a determined miner, then oil wildcatter in late 19th-early 20th century California. (Filmed in Texas for that authentic raw and rugged look.) Searching for "Oil!" and Sinclair Lewis on Google! I read that the original book was based on a real life California oil man who was cut from the same canvas as Howard Hughes (Sr. and Jr.). One gets the feeling that the main character is so bent on being #1 in the oil business that even blood relatives would be ground down as mercilessly as an enemy. The subplot with the "boy evangelist" shows who was a better user/con man before the final scene when wooden bowling pins figure in a savage beating. By the time "I'm done!" is declared, so is the audience. An interesting film, with unforgettable characters, but not for the faint of heart, those seeking insight into driven captains of industry or a happy ending. :stars:

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Actually, Parsi is also a language.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_language

In Spanish, I remember they call it either "Persa" or "Parsa," something like that. I guess Dari is a variation of Parsi (I GUESS).

No, no... I think you're referring to Farsi, there. a.k.a. Persian ;)

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Rented When Nietzsche Wept last night.

My wife is into artsy fartsy movies and when she asked me to watch this flick with her, I did so with reluctance, knowing I would be either bored or lost. But I was soon caught up in the world of late 19th century Vienna and the most interesting plot about Sigmund Freud's mentor, Dr. Josef Breuer, treating the psycho/physio murderously intense migraine headaches of author/lecturer Fredrich Nietzsche.

While this may not sound like much of a plot, the cast and crew are totally sold out to the novel and its writer, Irvin D, Yalom and the director, Pinchas Perry, who also wrote the screenplay. The sparse sets, the drab colors, the attention to form and posture of a formal Austrian society attempting to flourish, while showing compassion to the suffering of its citizenry are all foundationally solid; along with the foundering limitations of 19th century medical options and partial understanding of the relationship of mind to body. All these elements stay true to a Europe when physchological trauma was not only trying to be rationally understood, but treated to wellness.

It was not until near the end that I recognized the 1960's ladies pin-up heartthrob, Armande Assante had been playing Nietzsche! His characterization was so complete that I had not noticed who he was, beyond a very good actor.

After seeing Assante in this role, I would rank him with Sophia Loren, Sean Connery, and Jane Fonda as actors who were at first merely given limited roles that featured them as eye candy but whose range grew within their medium until becoming consumate pros at their craft.

9/10

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Parsi = Farsi

From what I gather, Arabs don't use "p," so they called it "Farsi." The name stuck. It can be called either way.

I could have sworn they use 'B' instead of 'P'. And 'Parsi = Farsi' = ':laughing:'. But you're obviously convinced you're right, so that's okay.

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I could have sworn they use 'B' instead of 'P'. And 'Parsi = Farsi' = ':laughing:'. But you're obviously convinced you're right, so that's okay.

They (as in Arabs) don't use "p." They use "f." It goes way back when Arab barbarians overran Persia.

Anyway, it is obvious you didn't read the first line about the disambiguation from the Internet link you provided. Let me copy and paste it for your benefit:

"This article is about the Parsi community. For the language related term, see Fars and Persian language."

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I'm about to pop in Barry Gordy's Last Dragon. The title sounds crazy. It's a kung-fu movie produced by a Motown bigwig!

shonuff199.jpg

Sho'nuff: Am I the meanest?

Sho'nuff 's Goons: Sho'nuff!

Sho'nuff: Am I the prettiest?

Sho'nuff 's Goons: Sho'nuff!

Sho'nuff: Am I the baddest mofo low down around this town?

Sho'nuff 's Goons: Sho'nuff!

Sho'nuff: Well who am I?

Sho'nuff 's Goons: Sho'nuff!

Sho'nuff: Who am I?

Sho'nuff 's Goons: Sho'nuff!

Sho'nuff: I can't hear you...

Sho'nuff 's Goons: Sho'nuff!

:rockon: :rockon: :rockon:

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