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I think it's good to follow the basic teachings of the main religions, but a lot of the specific rules should be ignored. If I hear about some farmer sleeping with a horse, I'm not going to take the responsibility to stone him or her to death.

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I think it's good to follow the basic teachings of the main religions, but a lot of the specific rules should be ignored. If I hear about some farmer sleeping with a horse, I'm not going to take the responsibility to stone him or her to death.

Of course some of those general ideas are good to follow because that's common sense stuff, which comes without the adherence to a religion... or believing in God. When religion and God come into play, the specific rules apply, or else you'd be a hypocrite if you were to ignore them :beatnik:

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I've only read bits and pieces of The Holy Bible, but if I had faith in what it said, you can bet I'd have read it many times over and have it highlighted in order to discuss with the pastor, deacon, and pretty much anyone who'd be willing to explain things through. So, it's one of the things I never understood about religious people - how can one have faith in something they haven't even read and studied? I'll take the Pepsi Challenge right now and ask any self-proclaimed xtian out on the street to name the ten commandments - and most won't be able to name them all. Good God, I'd consider that pretty relevant to commit to memory and action (and, if you've noticed, I just broke one of them). This is why I can't really fault the crazy thoughts and actions of "religious fanatics" - yes, they're crazy, but they're also the most honest when it comes to their faith on the word of their God. You peeps do know that The Holy Bible states that the punishment for adulterers, homosexuals, and people who have pre-marital sex is death, right? It rained fire on Sodom and Gomorrah. Who actually follows that rule? Islam. Aye, it is easier to pass a camel through the eye of a needle than to enter the Kingdom of God :beatnik:

Actually, and this may be a consequence of you only reading bits and pieces of the Bible, but the Bible says that the wages of all sin is death, not just the ones you listed. And being that all human beings according to the Bible are born sinful, the Ten Commandments are not really there as a to-do list to get into heaven, more of a way of showing one that one can not do it on their own. Hence why Jesus came along. I've read the Bible many a time, and yea, I hate that so many people claim to be Christian when in reality they're only Christian on Sundays. I've asked many friends who claim to be Christians about things in the Bible and half of them say "Oh, I've never read it".

Though I will say this. I have questioned just about everything I've found in the Bible to a pastor or so. Forced them to defend it and just about every time they've defended it to my satisfaction. Some of the stuff that's really confirmed it for me is stuff called apologetics. Logical explanations for religion. Rather than "oh because God said so" or "Because God made it that way", logical explanations for it. Check out the book "Mere Christianity" by C.S. Lewis sometime. Very interesting.

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Of course there are many other "sins" that God says they're punishable by death. I said those as examples.

Wait... Why did Jesus come along?

"But these enemies of mine, who did not want me to reign over them, bring them here and slay them in my presence."

Luke 19:27

Funny vidya :cool:

Heaven -

He has a monotone, yet compelling, voice :headphones:

Freewill? -

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Of course there are many other "sins" that God says they're punishable by death. I said those as examples.

Wait... Why did Jesus come along?

Funny vidya :cool:

Heaven -

He has a monotone, yet compelling, voice :headphones:

Freewill? -

Actually that quote was taken out of context. That was actually the middle of a parable Jesus was telling, Jesus was not stating to people "kill people in front of me", that's what the character in the parable was stating.

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I wasn't gonna respond to that , but I have read the Bible from cover to cover and I don't remember that being said.

Jesus was more about peace, love and forgiveness of your fellow man. That quote was definitely taken out of context.

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Actually that quote was taken out of context. That was actually the middle of a parable Jesus was telling, Jesus was not stating to people "kill people in front of me", that's what the character in the parable was stating.

You're right. It is oft misquoted. Someone recently quoted that to me when I asked about tolerance in relation to Jesus.

Edit: I usually like to pull from the Book Of Matthew:

Mat 10:34 Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword.

Mat 10:35 For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.

Mat 10:36 And a man's foes [shall be] they of his own household

To reiterate, I haven't read the book... but it's easy to memorise a few, random quotes :beatnik:

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Yes, but what - or who - is Jesus alluding to in the parable? :beatnik:

He is referring to what the master said. The entire parable is about three men who are given a different amount of minas each. Two go out and earn more but one hides it and returns the same exact amount. The two who earned more received praise whereas the one who did not was rebuked. The lesson, from what I've gleamed of it though I would recommend further research as I am no expert, is that one must trust God and make use of the gifts He gives you.

And as far as the quotes in Matthew, he was quoting a passage from the book of Micah in which the prophet describes the misery of Israel in their mistrust of God. Hence the connection Jesus drew from what he was saying earlier where he was stating that the Twelve needed to go out to the "lost sheep of Israel", that they needed to be brought back.

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He is referring to what the master said. The entire parable is about three men who are given a different amount of minas each. Two go out and earn more but one hides it and returns the same exact amount. The two who earned more received praise whereas the one who did not was rebuked. The lesson, from what I've gleamed of it though I would recommend further research as I am no expert, is that one must trust God and make use of the gifts He gives you.

Yes, and the servant who hid the mina gave it back, untouched, and spoke of his reason(s) as to why he disobeyed the master. Ultimately, whether it's a leader foreordained by God (since there is no freewill) or God himself, anyone whom God created for the direct purpose of disobeying him and Jesus is worthy of being put to death.

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As I stated before, the Bible says that anyone who sins, regardless of what said sin is, deserves death. But the death is not the point, the point is for one to realize that one can not do it on their own but needs the help of God.

But we could go back and forth like this forever. In the words of Stuart Chase, "For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't believe, no proof is possible."

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  • 2 weeks later...

I read "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time" by Mark Haddon. It's a book about an autistic boy who sets out to solve the mystery of who killed the neighbor's dog and finds a lot more than he bargained for. It's short, so I read it in one day, and it's completely engrossing, well written and interesting. 5/5

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

"The Kite Runner" - Kahled Hosseini

What a powerful, engrossing and touching book. I couldn't (and didn't want to) put it down. It's the story of Amir, whose guilt over an act of cowardice as a youth makes him take on an act of redemption as an adult. Sorry not to say much, but to do so would spoil it. 10/10

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