Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Farin

Rate the Last Movie You've Seen

Recommended Posts

"Jackie Brown", not one of Tarantino's best films, but still a great movie. I love Samuel L Jackson and Robert DeNiro's characterization portrayals, though the storyline seems to be repetitive and purposely drags along to fill out the time constraints.

87%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished "Precious" almost an hour ago. I read the book a while ago, and the movie was VERY toned down, but it was still a powerful movie. Very well acted and worth watching. 9/10.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:laughing:

I have avoided that movie just due to the title - it's so off-putting. With your review, though, it's going on my Netflix queue. :grin:

Blame the title on Gabriel García Márquez, author of the novel :beatnik:

For which he won the Nobel Prize in literature.

Hope you get to see it, Shawna. You won't regret the effort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished "Precious"

Another one I've been afraid of, because I hate crying and I thought that would make me cry. Did it make you cry? I don't even know what it's about. :crazy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Javier Bardim is great in "Love In The Time Of Cholera." He plays a man who pines his whole life for his unattainable "true love." Of course that lifetime of pining does not deter him from making love to over 600 other women, whom he catalogs in a journal. When he finally does hook up with his true love, at a very mature age, his best line is, "I haf remained a firgin for you."

It is a very entertaining epic/period movie.

I give it 9/10

I prefer Juan Antonio Bardem's work. Criterion released a movie by him a few years ago called Muerte De Un Ciclista :beatnik:

Muerte_de_un_ciclista2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one I've been afraid of, because I hate crying and I thought that would make me cry. Did it make you cry? I don't even know what it's about. :crazy:

It didn't make me cry, because I'd already read the book, but if I hadn't, then yes, I probably would have cried. Precious is about an abused, pregnant (by incest, and illiterate teenager who gets a second chance when she's sent to an alternative school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yep, that would definitely make me cry.

I went to a retreat once years ago, and a girl there, in her early 20s, I think, had a similar story: She was the product of a man who raped his daughter. So her father was also her grandfather. Her grandmother booted her and her mother out of the family home when she was very young because granny couldn't stand the sight of her since she was a "reminder that her husband had cheated."

Serious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched "Pan's Labyrinth" yesterday. Wow..it's a visually stunning movie. It's a story about a girl who escapes life with a cruel stepfather by imagining she's a princess. The labyrinth is an old stone maze on the property where she imagines seeing fairies and other creatures. A bit of violence and some creepiness, but otherwise a good movie. It's Spanish, so yes, you have to read subtitles, but IMO, that doesn't bother me 8/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

spirit-beehive-wide.jpg

El Laberinto De Fauno took its cue from 1973's El Espiritu De La Colmena (i.e., "The Spirit Of The Beehive"), including the timeline which was also set in the '40s. The cinematography for it is unmatched.

ec031.jpg

EspirituColmena04.jpg

39_0010_film1_spiritofbehive.jpg

beehive.jpg

259377070_280afb3cc0_o.jpg

Imagine "Pan's Labyrinth" sans the excess whimsy, overwrought sfx, gaudy melodrama, and you end with a more subdued and enigmatic piece :beatnik:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the new Sherlock Holmes movie yesterday. Robert Downey's portrayal of Holmes is radically different from the Basil Rathbone and Jeremy Brett characterizations. Not having read the Conan Doyle books, I can't say which portrayal is the most faithful to Conan Doyle's character.

The movie, though a little slow during the middle, is very good. I'm not a Jude Law fan, but his Dr. Watson is excellent and is almost Holmes' equal in deduction and self defense.

Robert Downey is at his quirky and ironic best as

Sherlock Holmes. His English accent strays a little bit from time to time, but this certainly doesn't affect the quality of the film. His Holmes is eccentric and spends his time between cases engaging in non-professional boxing matches (on which he places bets) or testing the efficacy of various chemicals and potions on his dog.

All in all, a very enjoyable movie.

7.5/10

This movie was a lot more true to Conan-Doyle's book. Holmes was a forgetful slob who also happened to be an incredible detective. Basil Rathbone's character was quite different from the books.

Quirky, enjoyable, too long and slow 5/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, Blues. I saw that a while ago in the theatre, and while I LOVE Robert Downey Jr with an enthusiasm stretching the bounds of normalcy, I still kept wondering when the &$%# is this movie going to end?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to see The Social Network, which is the movie about Facebook. It's really good, but there's no reason to see it in a theater - the kid next to me was texting most of the movie, which might make a statement of some kind.

The story is fascinating in a Law and Order kind of way, but nobody dies and there's no real villain, so the writing and acting had to be pretty much perfect to pull this one off. Fortunately, it's like my friend Pauly used to cook his steaks: extremely well done.

He has at least 50 IQ points on me, but I could relate to Mark Zuckerberg in how he got a bit obsessed over his website, but was very concerned about the user experience and creating something of value that he believed in.

8.5/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

spirit-beehive-wide.jpg

El Laberinto De Fauno took its cue from 1973's El Espiritu De La Colmena (i.e., "The Spirit Of The Beehive"), including the timeline which was also set in the '40s. The cinematography for it is unmatched.

ec031.jpg

EspirituColmena04.jpg

39_0010_film1_spiritofbehive.jpg

beehive.jpg

259377070_280afb3cc0_o.jpg

Imagine "Pan's Labyrinth" sans the excess whimsy, overwrought sfx, gaudy melodrama, and you end with a more subdued and enigmatic piece :beatnik:

Pan't Labrynth is still an excellent piece as its own work though :)

Fired up - I've watched this movie a few times already but I still find it more pleasing than the annoyingness of an American-Pie type film. 5/10

Frost vs Nixon - Very well acted and I can't help myself feeling a little sad for Nixon at the end of it. Although I am not sure what he did with those shoes he was given! 6/10

Australia - Loved it! 8/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to see The Social Network, which is the movie about Facebook. It's really good, but there's no reason to see it in a theater - the kid next to me was texting most of the movie, which might make a statement of some kind.

The story is fascinating in a Law and Order kind of way, but nobody dies and there's no real villain, so the writing and acting had to be pretty much perfect to pull this one off. Fortunately, it's like my friend Pauly used to cook his steaks: extremely well done.

He has at least 50 IQ points on me, but I could relate to Mark Zuckerberg in how he got a bit obsessed over his website, but was very concerned about the user experience and creating something of value that he believed in.

8.5/10

I agree! It was a great movie. But to me, it wasn't about Facebook. Well, it was. But only in the same way that there will be blood was about oil. David Fincher has done it again.

As for the last movie I saw . . .

As an avid fan of samurai films, I am ashamed to say that until yesterday I had not seen the Samurai trilogy by  Hiroshi Inagaki. It was nowhere near the awesomeness of Kurosawa's Seven Samurai but it was still quite good.

8/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Sweeney Todd this morning. I was more curious about hearing Johnny Depp sing than I was about anything else. It was gory and as usual from Tim Burton, very goth looking, but well acted, and well sung. 7/10.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About a month ago, on my cable's Cult Movie channel, I happened across the last 10 minutes of an animated movie that was so intriging I knew I would never be movie satisfied until I saw the entire thing. Last night, I finally stumbled upon it from its beginning and watched the entire Waking Life.

I can best describe it as a cartoon for adults; and I don't mean because of X-rated content. This is a deeply absorbing movie that explores, entirely through character conversations in a dreamlike world, a variety of existential philosophies that impact each one of us on various temporal levels. This is a perfect movie to be required for college-level psych and philosophy classes. Or just a great film to make anyone take pause to look at areas of life one can easily take for granted; and yet by doing so denying some of life's more glorious enigmas.

Although the subject of existentialism might sound dry and of limited interest, writer/director/cinematographer Richard Linklater uses a variety of intriguing story set ups to break through what in any other format might be boring. Each rotoscoped, digitally altered scene is only a few minutes long and builds upon the previous in a surprisingly ordered manner. The color-filled penultimate scene - that caught my initial attention and led me to search out the entire film - is still IMO the best thought provocation scene in a movie that I have watched in years.

One word of caution, should you try to find this 2001 release in a video store: just because it is audaciously animated, do not attempt to watch it after consuming one of Edna's brownies or after a few drinks of adult beverage. One needs fully lucid faculties to understand and appreciate the depth of this film.

Waking Life

9.2/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That rotoscope animation proggy was deviced and patented by Richard Linklater himself. He also did a Philip K. Dick story, A Scanner Darkly, some years back (I think 2006). Linklater is the American version of Eric Rohmer in style and editing - an old style, yet very refreshing every time he does it. I've been a fan of his since I saw his first film, Slacker (on-going dialogue vignettes done in the same manner as Waking Life). This guy did Dazed And Confused (which harkens back to American Graffiti) and a couple of my all-time favourites, Before Sunrise and Before Sunset. It's very hard to top such a repertoire. Btw, I used to give away copies of Waking Life for xmas :beatnik:

15pecha_awake109c.jpg

One goof in the movie to note: the dialogue about regenerating cells making humans into "new" persons. The guy in the dialogue didn't take into account brain neurons... which are essentially who we are in mind/spirit/soul :beatnik:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally got around to watching "Kill Bill, Part 2" yesterday. Not as violent as Part 1, and it had a lot more heart than I expected from a Tarantino movie. 8/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished Metal Gear Solid IV . . . wait. What? That was supposed to be a video game? With all the time spent watching rendered cinematics I assumed it was a movie.

Well then.

As a game 1/10

as a movie 6/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...