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:grin: I'm nothing if not formal, Joe. There is a quaint formality to my rampant vulgarity.

She does call us Mommy and Daddy, silly. I meant if we ask her a question and she doesn't hear us, she doesn't scream out "huh?" or "what?", she she'll say, "ma'am?" or "sir?".

That's how I was brought up. Also to adress my elders as "Miss Peaches" or "Mr. Joe" To this day when speaking to anyone older than myself (which is part of my job everyday) it's yes ma'am and yes sir. It's just a term of respect.

Also, in my world, Bud is used as more a term of endearment when speaking to a male friend or child. Buddy however, is just about on par with chick or hon .... it's just a bit insulting, showing they are too lazy to find out or remember the actual first name.

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If I called someone a chick it'd most likely translate to 'hot but probably brainless girl' :P

That's the context in which I use it. A lot of people at the office don't get it and probably think it's a word without connotation (because I use it all the time). "Yeah, that one chick from that other district... I ferget her name..." We just had a little seminar on 'sexual harrassment' at the office, so I picked up a lot of new ways to verbally jab the colleagues :cool:

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the thing with "sir" is it's used for younger men as well as older men, so there's no differentiating. With "miss" or "ma'am" there's a huge differentiation. One is for women who look younger and (presumably) therefore unmarried, one for women who look old. I hate that I'm the latter, and I hate being reminded that I now LOOK it, by the former. I actually feel flattered when someone calls me "miss," so to me, that would be the way to go if you don't want to ruffle feathers.

Some of my classmates went to lunch a couple of weeks ago, and one of them who is my age ordered the senior special. Then another gal who's about 20 ordered the same thing. The waitress said to her, "You have to be 55 to order that," and she hadn't even questioned the first one. :laughing:

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With "miss" or "ma'am" there's a huge differentiation. One is for women who look younger and (presumably) therefore unmarried, one for women who look old.

it's exactly the same in French with "Madam" and "Mademoiselle"

interestingly it's something completely different in German with "Frau" vs "Fräulein"

if you'd call a woman "Fräulein" she will probably be very offended, because it insinuates that she's too young, inexperienced, naive... more or less not to be taken seriously

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