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Lea, my hubby gets ticked when people call him "buddy"...I don't know why, I guess it's a pet peeve of his...And then to top it all off, my niece's husband has a habit of calling everybody buddy....he said it to hubby the other day...I could tell hubby was biting his tongue and trying hard not to say something...LOL...

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Ditto mine. But I think someone calling him Bro gets him going more than anything.

The last guy that called him that never said it again.

He told him, not only was he not his brother but he didn't even look like him. He wasn't very nice about it either :crazy:

My daughter has taken' to calling me dude :laughing: Whats up with that.

I have never been accused to even remotly resembaling a male :laughing:

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Pssst... Lea, dooooooode, keep yer bro outta my bizniz. I mean, c'mon, hon, I know he's yer buddy and all, but jeez, chickie, cut me some slack!

:grin:

[smallest] I'm afraid to look... any bombs being launched toward Phoenix from the general Oregon area yet? [/smallest]

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My husband (who is going on 50) got called "dude" by a guy he didn't even know at the supermarket. He thought it was funny.

As for me...I would find "broad" more derogatory than "chick", but the WORST is "ma'am". "Ma'am" makes me feel old. I know a lot of sales people use it respectfully, and in that context it's OK, but otherwise, no.

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I got called young lady by a kid who was obviously younger than me. He was trying to be charming but it annoyed me to no end. :mad:

My friends and I used chick as the female equivalent of dude-sort of a generic description, like if we saw a drunk girl at a party one of us would say "That chick is messed up."

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Hey, thanks for the thoughtful responses to my question. It came up a few days ago when I was looking through the DVDs my wife rented. I mentioned one was "a chick flick." She had never heard the term and asked me to explain. She caught on to how a movie is called a flick. After the "chick" explanation, she asked if American women still enjoyed being called chicks and I had no answer to that. I will let her read your responses.

BTW, earlier today, she asked, "Do you want to watch that chicken flick tonight?" I laughed.

Interesting about men who don't like to be called "buddy." To me that is a term of endearment on a par with "friend." In fact, I used the term in my birthday wish to Marc today.

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With hubby the term "buddy" used by people he doesn't even know annoys him...and as for my niece's husband out of respect should use hubby's name or even "uncle" which he is...when used among friends I guess he sees that in a different way which I guess doesn't bother him so much....

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I take great offense at the terms "Chick Flick" and "Chick Lit" because they are marketed in such a way that it makes women seem to be interested in only shopping, and eating ice cream when you can't find a man. I eat ice cream any damn time I please and I loathe shopping. I would rather see a movie with stuff getting blowed up than a movie about a woman soothing herself with purse shopping.

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As for me...I would find "broad" more derogatory than "chick", but the WORST is "ma'am". "Ma'am" makes me feel old. I know a lot of sales people use it respectfully, and in that context it's OK, but otherwise, no.

Jenny, that's interesting because when I grew up in CT, I never heard the word "ma'am" used. Since I've been here in GA, I hear it all the time. It's a sign of respect for children to call their elders "ma'am" and "sir". The Peachlette even calls us "ma'am" and "sir". It does make me feel old, but I also like the politeness of it.

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I take great offense at the terms "Chick Flick" and "Chick Lit" because they are marketed in such a way that it makes women seem to be interested in only shopping, and eating ice cream when you can't find a man. I eat ice cream any damn time I please and I loathe shopping. I would rather see a movie with stuff getting blowed up than a movie about a woman soothing herself with purse shopping.

Good gravy on mashed potatoes, I love you, lady.

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I take great offense at the terms "Chick Flick" and "Chick Lit"

I don't mind the term "chick flick" at all... when someone describes a movie as a "chick flick" I know exactly what type of movie they're talking about - like "horror" or "suspense" or "comedy." In fact, I used the term myself just today when I was out renting a movie, I said to my son, "I feel like watching a good chick flick." :laughing:

the term "chick lit" I don't believe I've ever heard in conversation - or anywhere, really. Except for a little kid on the beach in Cabo who came up trying to sell me chiclets gum. :crazy:

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