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MuzikTyme

Bands that Changed the Course of Music

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I'm going to add one to this list since I'm interviewing their drummer tomorrow: The Yardbirds.

They took the standard blues tunes and flipped them into something mysterious. They wrote their own songs as a band, and focused on their live sound.

Of course they were a huge influence on other artists, but how about the influence on themselves? Clapton, Beck and Page used The Yardbirds as a sandbox to see what kind of castles they could make, and they took their next projects to another level. Here's a revealing clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58mQvW0ROag

I might be up a while prepping this one - not often I get a Rock Hall of Famer on the line.

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I've always admired Lou.

Though, I'll be honest in saying I never thought he had/has an ounce (28 milligrams) of talent.

Groundbreaking? More like a mole's furrow.

But I can't deny VU's contribution to punk and other erratic music.

Thanks for your reply and welcome to Songfacts.

:)

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Bump...

the Commodores changed funk into a more user-friendly application to white folk.\

Trouble is, white folk can't dance...unless you consider the same three steps dancing.

Johnny Cash, I believe, changed the course of music in ANY genre. He kept his eyes wide open, or shut...most of the time and when he didn't, June took up the slack.

Just ask Lou Robin or Nine Inch Nails.

;)

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With all due respect to the different opinions regarding how music changed, I would go even further back to as early as the late twenties and early thirties. The term "rock and roll" itself can be found in a song from the mid thirties called Get Rhythm In Your Feet and Music In Your Soul" by a Henry "Red" Allen.

Rock and Roll is a melding of the Blues and Rockabilly, both existent from the thirties on and then it flashed into something greater in the fifties. I would say Rock and Roll's origins definitely come out of the south.

In the fifties guys like Presley, Holly and Berry brought it to the next level.

Initially I would say the Rolling Stones and The Who's music was somewhat deeper than the Beatles while the Beatles were still playing for the bubblegum set. When the Beatles morphed into greater musical geniuses then they already were, that was a significant change in how we listened to rock. The question is besides the usuals we have heard in the past like Fats Domino, Holly and Berry who influenced in the Beatles as youngsters, who influenced them further when they left bubblegum tunes for a more diverse and eclectic offering.

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...who influenced the Beatles as youngsters, who influenced them further when they left bubblegum tunes for a more diverse and eclectic offering?

My only guess is that the members as youngsters already had natural artistic talent before appreciating the likes of Chuck Berry and Li'l Richard. As well as many other black artists dating back to the early, steady rumble of Algerian djembes. What could be expected from the raw genius of the Beatles than to evolve even further? Paul or Ringo would be the best ones to ask.

;)

How bout Frank Zappa?

I think that ' Zappa was a life changer as well as a groundbreaker

:)

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As much as I love AC/DC, I'm not sure they really influenced a major movement in music...

A very interesting fork in the road . . .

AC/DC possibly hasn't influenced bands to come? hmmm. My only retort would be, "Listen to & watch this "

It's subjective, anyhow. But I do feel AC/DC had a huge impact on hundreds of aspiring bands.

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