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2008 Presidential Election


Mike
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I thought in Florida was were your vote counted most often, er, I mean, was recounted most often.

Here is Washington, last Gov. election, it took 3 recounts to find enough votes of dead people and unregistered voters to plant a democrat in office by 150 votes.

Our illegitimate Democratic Gov. has increased spending by 33 percent and raised our taxes by half a billion dollars in the last 4 years.

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Hold on to your wallets if Clinton or Obama get elected...they never met a tax they didn't like. They both want universal healthcare and have no idea how to pay for it...oh, yes they do...taxes.

Gas taxes will go up, tolls will go up, income tax will go up, hidden taxes will go up...BUT, they will cut some expenses out...the subsidies that go to the states will be cut...you'll then get increased state, county, or city taxes on top of the federal taxes.

If paying additional tax for little or no benefit to you is OK....then voting for Clinton or Obama makes sense...otherwise $$$.

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If I were an American, I would vote for Mitt Romney. At least he's demonstrated that he can turn around sickly businesses and, after all, the way Bush is spending money on the military and on his ill-conceived economic stimulus package, the U.S. economy is looking pretty sickly right now.

Normally I look favourably on Democratic candidates, but since John Edwards dropped out, IMO, there isn't much to choose between Clinton and Obama. I don't like or have confidence in either of them. But then, since I don't get to vote, I don't imagine they really care what I think.

I do think, however, that the U.S. system of choosing Presidential candidates is MUCH more democratic than the system we have in Canada. In Canada, relatively small groups of party hacks choose the party leaders at national conventions and the rest of us are left to vote for the least objectionable leadership crap during our federal elections. But, as Sammy said, we do make good lager.

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If I were an American, I would vote for Mitt Romney. At least he's demonstrated that he can turn around sickly businesses and, after all, the way Bush is spending money on the military and on his ill-conceived economic stimulus package, the U.S. economy is looking pretty sickly right now.

Normally I look favourably on Democratic candidates, but since John Edwards dropped out, IMO, there isn't much to choose between Clinton and Obama. I don't like or have confidence in either of them. But then, since I don't get to vote, I don't imagine they really care what I think.

I do think, however, that the U.S. system of choosing Presidential candidates is MUCH more democratic than the system we have in Canada. In Canada, relatively small groups of party hacks choose the party leaders at national conventions and the rest of us are left to vote for the least objectionable leadership crap during our federal elections. But, as Sammy said, we do make good lager.

It's not democratic at all. How presidents get elected is based on the electoral college. This is how you get candidates who DO get the majority of people's votes and, yet, have a loser voted in as president. I'd vote for Romned as well, but fat chance with mike *uckabee in the race. There's no way I'd vote for mccain. I'll prolly sit at home, veg, and eat cheetos.

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I didn't say that the U.S. system is perfect, I just said that it is more democratic than the Canadian system. At least average Americans have some say in the selection of their presidential nominees. All but a very few Canadians, have no say in the selection of party leaders. Each of the major parties has a national convention which only a few thousand party insiders are allowed to attend. They alone decide who will be the person to lead their respective parties in the next general election. And in the last 20 years or so, the party elected to power seldom receives the greatest percentage of the popular vote. So all things considered, I prefer the American federal political sytem, flawed though it may be.

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That sounds a lot like the electoral college... not to mention all the special interest groups who fund these campaigns. More money was wasted in this primary election bulls*** than was spent on programs such as making healthcare affordable, after school activities, etc. Once they're in power, they do nothing. I've never seen obama, hillary, mccain, *uckabee - anyone - get this riled up about anything in the past eight years. I heard they wanna do away with the irs. Shyeah. Good luck with that, space cadet. It takes an act of congress to get anything done... and everyone here knows congress has been about doing nothing.

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I didn't say that the U.S. system is perfect, I just said that it is more democratic than the Canadian system. At least average Americans have some say in the selection of their presidential nominees.

No, the average American, has NO say, it's all based on large endorsements of unions, newspapers, influentials, and the very wealthy.

The American political system is a disgrace.

Promises, or plain downright lies, about opponents, to the public is the foundation of a campaign. It's just amazing that we are as well off as we are considering our political system.

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The Canadian elections are won and lost in 2 provinces. However, should there be a need for it (which doesn't noormally happen) then southern B.C. gets thelast say.

Usually, tho... after returning home from voting, I'll turn on the TV and see that one party is kickin butt, so basically I voted just for the excercise! :doh:

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No, the average American, has NO say, it's all based on large endorsements of unions, newspapers, influentials, and the very wealthy.

The American political system is a disgrace.

Promises, or plain downright lies, about opponents, to the public is the foundation of a campaign. It's just amazing that we are as well off as we are considering our political system.

Canadians are very smug when it comes to comparisons between the U.S. and Canada. We like to think that special interest groups and powerful lobbyists do not influence elections and public policy decisions in Canada the way such groups do in the U.S. Yeah, right!!! The only difference here is that the special interest groups and lobbyist are a little more subtle when it comes to putting pressure on various levels of government.

Lawyers and civil libertarians here have caused the creation of Human Rights Commissions that basically act as censors of free speech. If you say something to which someone else (read special interest groups) takes offence, you can be hauled before these Commissions and charged with promoting hatred or intolerance.

In Canada, 8 unelected members of our Supreme Court (they are political appointees) wield more power than our elected representatives in Parliament. Often, these doddering oligarchs put the kibosh on proposed legislation because it is "unconstitutional", at least according to them.

As for our Charter of Rights and Freedoms which is equivalent to the U.S. constitution, it has been used time and again by minorities and special interest groups to subvert the will of the majority.

As for our legal system (I refuse to call it a justice system), it is on life support. Venal lawyers and senile judges place more importance on the rights of violent criminal offenders than they do on the rights of victims and the law abiding members of society. Everyday we see egregeious examples of repeat violent offenders being given inadequate sentences. In my city alone, two recent murders were committed by felons who were out on bail while awaiting trial on charges of rape in one case and assault with a deadly weapon in another.

I guess this just goes to show that there is a great deal of dissatisfaction with the political systems in both our countries.

While there is much room for improvement, at least our systems are vastly superior to those in many other countries.

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Obama needs to show his sensitive side, maybe if he teared up at a rally, started saying how much he loves his mother, talk a bit about how influential his mother is to a her sons political drive. Women love that stuff, he needs more than Oprah's endorsement to kick some more hot air out of Hillary.

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Canadians are very smug when it comes to comparisons between the U.S. and Canada. We like to think that special interest groups and powerful lobbyists do not influence elections and public policy decisions in Canada the way such groups do in the U.S. Yeah, right!!! The only difference here is that the special interest groups and lobbyist are a little more subtle when it comes to putting pressure on various levels of government.

Lawyers and civil libertarians here have caused the creation of Human Rights Commissions that basically act as censors of free speech. If you say something to which someone else (read special interest groups) takes offence, you can be hauled before these Commissions and charged with promoting hatred or intolerance.

In Canada, 8 unelected members of our Supreme Court (they are political appointees) wield more power than our elected representatives in Parliament. Often, these doddering oligarchs put the kibosh on proposed legislation because it is "unconstitutional", at least according to them.

As for our Charter of Rights and Freedoms which is equivalent to the U.S. constitution, it has been used time and again by minorities and special interest groups to subvert the will of the majority.

As for our legal system (I refuse to call it a justice system), it is on life support. Venal lawyers and senile judges place more importance on the rights of violent criminal offenders than they do on the rights of victims and the law abiding members of society. Everyday we see egregeious examples of repeat violent offenders being given inadequate sentences. In my city alone, two recent murders were committed by felons who were out on bail while awaiting trial on charges of rape in one case and assault with a deadly weapon in another.

I guess this just goes to show that there is a great deal of dissatisfaction with the political systems in both our countries.

While there is much room for improvement, at least our systems are vastly superior to those in many other countries.

I got two words for this undemocratic US election: "super delegates."

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