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daslied

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Everything posted by daslied

  1. I WROTE HER OFF FOR THE TENTH TIME TODAY PRACTICED ALL THE THINGS I WOULD SAY WHEN SHE CAME OVER I LOST MY NERVE I TOOK HER BACK AND MADE HER DESSERT OH I KNOW I'M BEIN' USED THAT'S OK, MAN 'CAUSE I LIKE THE ABUSE I KNOW SHE'S PLAYIN' WITH ME THAT'S OK 'CAUSE I GOT NO SELF-ESTEEM OH A-YEAH YEAH YEAH YEAH OH YEAH YEAH OH YEAH YEAH OH YEAH YEAH WE MAKE PLANS TO GO OUT AT NIGHT I WAIT TILL TWO THEN I TURN OUT THE LIGHT THIS REJECTION'S GOT ME SO LOW IF SHE KEEPS IT UP I JUST MIGHT TELL HER SO OH A-YEAH YEAH YEAH YEAH OH YEAH YEAH OH YEAH YEAH OH YEAH YEAH WHEN S
  2. Could it be "Self-Esteem" by The Offspring? That has the line "Then I wonder why she sleeps with my friends".
  3. "Crazy Mary" is on a tribute to Victoria Williams CD; I think it's called "Sweet Relief" or something similar.
  4. OK, I believe that this is NOT a sample. I think someone actually played it. It is somewhat similar to part of the "Kashmir" riff. It's even in the same key. The first chord in each is actually a standard guitar "power chord", utilizing the notes D and A (the first and fifth scale degrees in the key of D). The second chord has a D and a Bb (the first and flatted/minor 6th scale degree). The top note in "Kashmir" goes up chromatically two more half steps (to B natural and C) while maintaining the pedalled root note of D. "Lose Yourself" simply rocks back and forth between the top A and top B
  5. It's probably about Hank Williams (Sr.). He got "suspended" from the Opry for being drunk all the time, and he died the next year. Johnny Cash also got banned, but that was for kicking out some stage lights...of course, he was high on pills.
  6. Here's what I found. These are actual in-concert quotes from Leonard about the song. The dates and places are listed. Hope it helps, and sorry for the length of the post! First We Take Manhattan (1988-2001) Berlin April 9th, 1988 Berlin, at last, yes the final peace in my vast geopolitical jigsaw, Berlin at last, the worshippers of the bear, how happy I am to be among you. Hamburg 14/4/88 Yeah, these are new songs, huh? Maybe lots of people think I didn't write anything after "Suzanne." But I wrote one or two songs after "Suzanne." Here's a song I wrote 20 years after "
  7. I thought they were using a Gorillaz song ("Feel Good Inc." or similar title). Before that was "Jerk It Out" by The Caesars. And, preceding that, of course was U2's "Vertigo".
  8. "Get Together" - The Youngbloods" "Take Me To The River" - The Talking Heads
  9. Something sort of similar is "Classical Gas" by Mason Williams. It's from the 60's, I think, and it's a nylon string guitar. You can try Ottmar Liebert (excuse the spelling); he's got some similar stuff as well.
  10. There's a Jethro Tull song/epic called "Baker St. Muse", from "Minstrel In The Gallery", all about the same place. 17 minutes of grandeur. Awesome.
  11. Actually, I believe the impetus for "A Day In The Life" was a story in paper John Lennon ready about a Guiness heir who died in a car wreck. That's the "He blew his mind out in a car" part. I can't remember his name, though, and it's probably not very significant historically.
  12. If you use a program like Steinberg Cubase, or any similar recording software, here's what you can do: Load your wave/mp3 of the song. Highlight the whole thing. Do an export, and choose "Stereo Split" as the channel outputs. The export will give you two identical mono files - one will be the left channel and one will be the right. You can then import these files onto two tracks, and do another export ("mixdown") to get a single, stereo version of your two mono files. I hope this is what you're asking...
  13. "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday. Probably the most chilling song about racism and lynchings ever made. Lyrics: SOUTHERN TREES BEAR A STRANGE FRUIT BLOOD ON THE LEAVES AND BLOOD AT THE ROOT BLACK BODIES SWINGIN? IN THE SOUTHERN BREEZE STRANGE FRUIT HANGIN? FROM THE POPLAR TREES PASTORAL SCENE OF THE GALLANT SOUTH THE BULGING EYES AND THE TWISTED MOUTH SCENT OF MAGNOLIA SWEET AND FRESH THEN THE SUDDEN SMELL OF BURNIN? FLESH HERE IS A FRUIT FOR THE CROWS TO PLUCK FOR THE RAIN TO GATHER FOR THE WIND TO SUCK FOR THE SUN TO ROT FOR THE TREE TO DROP HERE IS A STRANGE
  14. I'm not trying to be confrontational, but I have a few "rebuttals" to "ImThatGuyToo". I realize this is an opinion-based topic (much less one that's almost a year old), but I'm very defensive about The Beatles. "ThatGuy", please understand there is no disrespect intended! I agree with most of what you posted, save for a few items: #3 - I don't think you can answer this question. It's like asking if Bonds could've hit Cy Young or Ruth could've hit Randy Johnson. We'll never know. Pop music would be completely different if it weren't for The Beatles 40 years ago. If pop had stayed in the Elv
  15. Also, Ben Folds covered it, but he called it "Brick". Oh wait, sorry...
  16. Touché...definitely fun. I hate parties, but if I could find one where people would actually sing along to "Grace" I'd be there in a heartbeat!
  17. Sorry to say, but "American Pie" by Don McClean. "Lola" by The Kinks "Good Riddance" by Green Day - I hate it, but the kids love it... And, in response to an earlier post - if you can sing "Grace" by Jeff Buckley you shouldn't be playing at parties...
  18. I actually thought it was inspired by "What's Goin' On" by Marvin Gaye, which came out a year or two earlier. That was kind of the benchmark as far as introducing social commentary into R&B, or at least one of the first to do so. Some of Stevie's best lyrics, I think. Definitely inspired by the racial issues of the time; segregation, civil rights, lack of equal opportunity employment, etc.
  19. Ah, got it. I will try to add my provocation for listing these in the next few days. I'm sure you'll all be on pins & needles...
  20. Damien Rice - "O" Rufus Wainwright - "Rufus Wainwright" Aimee Mann - "Magnolia" soundtrack Tom Waits - "Alice" Stevie Wonder - "Fulfillingness' First Finale"
  21. Damien Rice - "O" The most emotionally honest album to come out in years. Recorded in his house, there doesn't seem to be a lot of "fixing" or overdubbing, which gives it that Beatles quality. It just sounds like a guy playing in his room with some friends, which I think is sorely lacking today. Highlights - "Cold Water" - haunting and very stark with amazing dynamic shifts. The interplay of his and her (Lisa Hannigan) voices is beautiful, and the simple ascending cello line is perfect. "The Blower's Daughter" - the whole reason I want to see the movie "Closer". A beautiful song, espec
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