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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts


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"Sky Is Crying, The"

Stevie Ray Vaughan

The song was written by Elmore James in 1959 and is a blues standard. Also credited to Elmore James/M. Levy/Clarence Lewis.

Elmore James was credited as the sole song writer on his Fire Records single. However, over the years, several names have appeared alongside his on various reissues and covers of the song. In 1991, Elmore James' "The Sky Is Crying" was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in the "Classics of Blues Recordings - Single or Album Tracks" category.

The song is a track of his posthumous album The album "The Sky Is Crying", released in November 5th, 1991, one year after SRV's death.

These songs were recorded in sessions spanning from 1984's Couldn't Stand the Weather to 1989's In Step and were left off of the LPs for whatever reason (or, in the case of Soul to Soul's "Empty Arms," a different version was used)
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"Who's Making Love"

Johnny Taylor (1968)

A song written by Atax staffers Homer Banks, Bettye Crutcher, Don Davis, Al Jackson, Jr. and Raymond Jackson.

The single, released by Stax in the summer of 1968, was his first big hit, reaching #1 on the Billboard Hot R&B charts and #5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The album was compiled lated, including the track that give its name to the album, released later on the same year.

Allmusic talks about "Taylor's tough but impassioned vocal supported by a potently energetic performance by the usual Stax Records crew (including Steve Cropper, Donald "Duck" Dunn, and the Memphis Horns)"

It became one of the few singles Taylor would become primarily known for in the mainstream. The song featured Stax in-house band Booker T. & the MG's, and Isaac Hayes (on keyboards) ... The single became Taylor's best-selling single to date before the release of "Disco Lady" almost a decade later.

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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #217

This week there are two songs needing facts.

Effigy - Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)

Bye Bye Love - The Cars (1978)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution. As always the Songfish thanks you. getsmileyphp8-1.gif

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"Bye Bye Love"

The Cars

Written by Rick Ocasek.

The song is a track of their 1978 debut album, "The Cars" . Ben Orr is the lead vocalist.

The song title differs from the Everly Brothers Bye Bye Love in its placement of an implied comma. The Cars song title is spoken as "Bye, Bye Love" whereas The Everly Brothers title is spoken as "Bye Bye, Love".

The song was composed before the 1980s, in 1978, but was likely featured due to the Cars having many hits in the 1980s and "Bye Bye Love" did have an "80s sound".

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"Effigy"

Creedence Clearwater Revival

The last track from their 4th album, "Willy and the Poor Boys", it was written by John Fogerty.

Released on November 2nd 1969.

the eerie minor-key closer "Effigy" (one of John Fogerty's most haunting numbers)

:help:

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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #218

This week there are five songs needing facts.

Second Hand News - Fleetwood Mac (1977)

Are You Ready - Pacific Gas & Electric (1970)

Scare Easy - Mudcrutch (2008)

See My Friends - Kinks (1965)

I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know - Blood, Sweat & Tears (1968)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution. As always the Songfish thanks you. smaccordeon.gif

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"Are You Ready"

Pacific Gas & Electric

Written by Charlie Allen and John Hill.

It's a track from their third album, "Are You Ready". According to allmusic, the ominous yet inspirational gospel-funk-psychedelia of "Are You Ready" was the strongest track, and to this day the only one that most casual rock fans remember.

The single was released in 1970 and it reached #14 on the Billboard Hot 100

:help:

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"Second Hand News"

Fleetwood Mac

Written by Lindsey Buckingham.

A track of their 1977 Top selling album "Rumours".

It was recorded in 1976 and wasn' t releaesd as a single.

Yet it's the opening track and wikipedia says

...an originally an acoustic demo titled "Strummer". After hearing Bee Gees' "Jive Talking", Buckingham and co-producer Dashut built up the song with four audio tracks of electric guitar and the use of chair percussion to evoke celtic rock.

:help: :help:

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"See My Friends"

Kinks (1965)

Written by Ray Davies.

Released as a single with "Never Met a Girl Like You Before" as the B-side in July 1965 in the UK and two months later in the US.

The song reached #10 on the UK Singles Chart.

It's a track of their first album "Kinda Kinks"

A rare foray into psychedelic rock for the group, it is credited as the first Western rock song to integrate Indian raga sounds, being released two months before The Beatles' "Norwegian Wood".

The song is sometimes mistitled "See My Friend", because this is how the song was identified on the initial UK single pressing. However, the website of Kassner Music, which owns the publishing rights to the song, specifies the title as "See My Friends", which are also the words Davies clearly sings throughout the track. Most subsequent issues of the song have borne the more familiar "See My Friends" title.

Ray Davies has been heard to say the song is about the loss of his sister, who lived for a time in Ontario, Canada. Upon her return to England she developed a sickness and died while dancing at a night club. Just before she died he says she gave him his first guitar for his 13th birthday. Inspiration for the song came after a stopover in Bombay, where, finding himself jetlagged on a beach, Davies encountered two fishermen chanting on their way to their morning work. He wrote the song while travelling in India years later when he heard about the significance of the Ganges river in the Indian death ritual. Two years later he again used the metaphor of crossing a river in his masterpiece Waterloo Sunset.
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"I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know"

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Written by Al Kooper.

A track from their first album, "Child Is Father to the Man", recorded in the end of 1967 and released in February 1968.

It wasn't released as a single but the song was aired a lot on progressive rock radio stations.

...and that's all I found.

I hope some of you will know better... :shades:

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"Scare Easy"

Mudcrutch (2008)

A song written by Tom Petty.

It was released in April 2008 as a track of "Mudcrutch" their debut studio album. It was also released as a single.

Tom Petty on bass and lead vocals; Mike Campbell on guitar and mandolin, Tom Leadon (guitar and vocals)and Randall Marsh on drums had formed the band early in 1970 but after 1974 and a failed single, they disbanded and Tom Petty formed The Heartbreakers.

In August 2007, Tom Petty invited original members of Mudcrutch Randall Marsh and Tom Leadon to reunite with Heartbreakers Benmont Tench and Mike Campbell to reform Mudcrutch. They recorded an album, Mudcrutch, which was released on April 29, 2008, by Reprise Records, and contains 14 old and new tracks. "We would play and then we would just talk about the old days," said Tom Leadon. The band toured briefly in California to promote the album throughout April and the beginning of May 2008.
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More about the original Blood, Sweat & Tears which only lasted one album.

Al Kooper, Jim Fielder, Fred Lipsius, Randy Brecker, Jerry Weiss, Dick Halligan, Steve Katz, and Bobby Colomby formed the original band. The creation of the group was fueled by the "brass-rock" ideas of The Buckinghams and its producer, James William Guercio, as well as the early 1960s Roulette-era Maynard Ferguson Orchestra (according to Kooper's autobiography).

Al, Bobby, Steve & Jim did a few shows as a quartet at the Cafe Au Go Go in New York City in September 1967 opening for Moby Grape . Fred Lipsius then joined the others two months later. A few more shows were played as a quintet, including one at the Fillmore East in New York. Lipsius then recruited the other three, who were New York jazz horn players he knew. The final lineup debuted late November ’67 at The Scene in NYC. The band was a hit with the audience, who liked the innovative fusion of jazz with acid rock and psychedelia. After signing to Columbia Records, the group released perhaps one of the most critically acclaimed albums of the late 1960s, Child Is Father to the Man, featuring the Harry Nilsson song, "Without Her", and perhaps Kooper's most memorable blues number, "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know". The album cover was considered quite innovative showing the band members sitting and standing with child-sized versions of themselves. Characterized by Kooper's penchant for studio gimmickry, the album slowly picked up in sales amidst growing artistic differences between the founding members. Colomby and Katz wanted to move Kooper exclusively to keyboard and composing duties, while hiring a stronger vocalist for the group.

Wikipedia

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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #219

There are no facts needed this week. The past couple of weeks of so, there seemed to be a lot of songs that needed facts. As always you came through and posted some.

You deserve a break and a happy dance as preformed by The Blues Bro's getsmileyphp2.gif

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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #220

This week there are three songs needing facts.

Turn To Stone - Electric Light Orchestra (1977)

Time To Kill - The Band (1970)

Kentucky Woman - Deep Purple (1968)

[smallest](listed as a Neil Diamond cover if you want to add more facts you can but it is listed under the Neil Diamond orig.)[/smallest]

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution. As always the Songfish thanks you. music-smiley-018-1.gif

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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #220

This week there are three songs needing facts.

Turn To Stone - Electric Light Orchestra (1977)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution. As always the Songfish thanks you. music-smiley-018-1.gif

"Turn To Stone"

ELO

Essentially a love song, "Turn to Stone" is orchestrated, computerized, epic rock music courtesy of Jeff Lynne. But with its psychedelic lyrics the song gains an entirely new perspective. Texture is the key component to this song. Even though the song is orchestrated, the chugging synthesized bass helps the song really move along and keeps any ambience at bay. Due to the song's complex layering, the group was discovered using tapes to reproduce the song in concert.

"Turn to Stone" is a 1977 song by Electric Light Orchestra.

The song is the opening track to the double album Out of the Blue. It was the first song released as a single from the LP. The single reached #18 in the U.K. charts and stayed there for 12 weeks. Out of four singles from the album, "Turn to Stone" was the only song not to reach the top ten in the U.K. singles charts. The song was more successful across the Atlantic, reaching #13 in the U.S and hitting the top spot in Canada in early-1978.

The song was composed in Switzerland during Jeff Lynne's two week writing marathon for his double album. Lynne played the moog bassline of the song.

On November 4, 2008, Jeff Lynne was awarded a BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc) Million-Air certificates for "Turn To Stone" for having one million airplays.

The song featured in the Doctor Who episode "Love & Monsters" (2006), along with "Mr. Blue Sky" and "Don't Bring Me Down", both of which were performed by characters in the episode.[1]

The song is also featured in the movie Detroit Rock City.

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"Time To Kill"

The Band

Written by Robbie Robertson. A track of their third album "Stage Fright" recorded in the spring of 1970 and released in August of the same year.

The single went to #77 in the Pop Singles charts in the US.

According allmusic, "Time to Kill," as its title implied, revealed boredom while claiming romantic contentment.

...et voilà.

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