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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts


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"Fool For The City"

Foghat

Written by Lonesome Dave Peverett.

A track of their fifth album "Fool for the City", 1975.Also released as a single in 1976, reaching #45 in the pop charts. The album was certified platinum.

The British ex-pats and former members of Savoy Brown who formed Foghat -- "Lonesome" Dave Peverett and Roger Earl -- found a U.S. welcome when they hit with "Fool for the City" (and "Slow Ride") from the 1975 album Fool for the City. Hard rock through and through and built around a chunka-chunka guitar and heavy bass riff, the hard successfully merged with a soft, bubblegum-style catchy singalong chorus chant: "cause I'm a fool for the city!" The formula worked for the band, as the song seemingly became a '70s classic immediately upon release. Its popularity was no doubt aided by the band's constant late-night television appearances, and the record became a must-have in every suburban teenager's pre- punk record collection. Soon, Foghat would become the butt of many a "dinosaur" rock joke in a post-punk world. But 25 years on, "Fool for the City" is once again a classic -- this time in the rock & roll "party music" canon.
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Another Saturday Night" is the title of a 1963 hit single by Sam Cooke from the album Ain't That Good News. It reached number ten on the Billboard Hot 100 and was number one on the R&B chart for a single week.[1] In the UK, the song peaked at number 23 on the UK Singles Chart.

In 1974, Cat Stevens recorded a version of the song which peaked at number six on the Hot 100.

Wiki

phil, let me add a review from allmusic :)

"Another Saturday Night" was one of the biggest of the many hits Sam Cooke had in the first half of the 1960s, making #10 in 1963. Like many of the early soul hits of the time, there was a pronounced Latin lilt to the rhythms. The main hook of the song was the extremely catchy chorus, whose relatively upbeat, good-time feel juxtaposed against the lyric of the lonely guy without a date on Saturday night. That's a situation almost every guy has gone through, and thus was guaranteed to strike a responsive chord in much of the audience. The verses were kind of secondary to the chorus in their melodic appeal and lyrical resonance, but served to flesh out the complaint of the song's title with examples of his frustrated attempts to land a date. While it's doubtful that Cooke himself had problems filling up his Saturday nights in real life, as usual he sounds like he's living the lyric, though more with a merry resignation than abject self-pity. "Another Saturday Night" found new life a decade later when Cat Stevens, known principally for more serious and self-reflective singer-songwriter statements, took a more pop-oriented and frivolous arrangement of the song into the Top Ten in 1974

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"Big City Nights"

Scorpions

A song credited to Rudolf Schenker and Klaus Meine.

A track of their LP "Love at First Sting", released in 1984, and also the third single from the album. Its B-side is "Bad Boys Running Wild", released in the same year.

An orchestral version of the song was recorded by the band for the 2000s orchestral album Moment of Glory that features vocals split with Ray Wilson of Genesis.

The song was covered on the Fozzy album Happenstance.

:help:

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #225

ALL songs from this week's Top Ten are currently part of the Songfacts database.

Thank you to EVERYONE that has helped gather the facts through the years. This may be the last weekly Top Ten for us. We're hoping to bring it back after a short summer break.

You've all done an excellent job and we thank you all for playing :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow:

HAPPY FORTH OF JULY EVERYONE !!!!!!

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  • 1 month later...

The Songfactors Choice Top Ten #226

Break is over, welcome back everyone !!!!!

party0038.gif

This week there are seven songs needing facts.

You've Got Your Troubles - The Fortunes (1965)

Lay It On The Line - Triumph (1979)

Time Is On My Side - Irma Thomas (1964)

I Love You - The Zombies (1965)

My Heroics Pt. one - Absynthe Minded (2005)

7 and 7 Is - Love (1966)

Proof - I Am Kloot (2003)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. :rock:

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"You've Got Your Troubles"

The Fortunes

Credited to Roger Greenaway and Roger Cook.

The single was released in August 1965 and it went #1 in Canada, #7 in the US and #2 in the UK.

It's also a track of the album The Fortunes, released in the same year.

The Fortunes fifth single was a ballad written by professional songwriters Roger Greenaway & Roger Cook and the recording featured lavish instrumentation as well as the now trademark 3-part harmonies by the group featuring Rod Allen's lead. The song You've Got Your Troubles, suited the band's image perfectly with the record almost reaching the top spot in the British charts in August of 1965 and also climbing to No. 7 in the U.S. charts.

:help:

Edited by Guest
right quote in the right post. :)
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"Lay It On The Line"

Triumph

Written by Rik Emmet, it's a track from their 1979 album "Just A Game". It was also released as a single.

It was their biggest hit.

Edited by Guest
edited cuz I don't like deleting. See below for edna's real post. :)
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Time is on My Side - Irma Thomas

Originally written by Jerry Ragovoy under the pseudonym of Norman Meade. The only lyrics at that point was the refrain "time is on my side" and the "you'll come runnin' back" part. The song was first recorded by jazz trombonist Kai Winding and his Orchestra in 1963 (as a B side), with the backing vocals provided by Cissy Houston, Dionne Warwick and Dee Dee Warwick.

In 1964, the song was covered by both Irma Thomas and The Rolling Stones, with the additional lyrics, written by Jimmy Norman. Thomas' gospel inspired version was released in early '64, with the Stones version coming later in September of '64. The monologue and intertwining guitar solo were original to Thomas' version, and copied almost word for word and note for note on the Rolling Stones release.

Source/wiki

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"I Love You"

The Zombies

Written by Chris White.

Recorded by The Zombies on July, 8th 1965 and released as the B-side of the single with "Whenever You're Ready" as the A-side.

The song charted in many countries.

It was later included as a track in an album ("The Zombies", 1966) that was only released in Holland and Japan.

Opening with the same syncopated drum figure as "She Not There," "I Love You," while not being one of the Zombies' more adventurous tracks, certainly attracted a lot of attention and cover versions.

"The thing that came first was the riff. That was the root of writing that one. In actual fact I think I nicked it off Tommy Roe".

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"You've Got Your Troubles"

The Fortunes

Credited to Roger Greenaway and Roger Cook.

The single was released in August 1965 and it went #1 in Canada, #7 in the US and #2 in the UK.

It's also a track of the album The Fortunes, released in the same year.

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Edna, do you want to edit your Fortunes post? You accidentally put their facts on Triumph's post. :D

:doh: :doh:

That's what you get when you have a house full of people and the cats are jumping on the keyboard... :laughing:

Sorry, Lucky. Yes, please, could you delete my first two posts, the one about The Fortunes and the one about Triumph? I posted them again but in the proper way...

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"My Heroics Pt. one"

Absynthe Minded

Written by Bert Ostyn.

It's their first single and also a track of their album "New Day", recorded in January, 2005 and released in March in Belgium, Holland and Germany

The song was heard a lot on the radios in Europe that summer.

Absynthe Minded is a Belgian rock band, around frontman, vocalist and guitarist Bert Ostyn. Their tracks have been known to contain a mix of thirties jazz, with a touch of funky soul, Balkan beats and Merseyside pop.
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"7 and 7 Is"

Love

Written by Arthur Lee.

Recorded on June 20th, 1966 and released in July on the same year. Its B-side was "No. Fourteen", as an answer to the title of the A-side.

It reached #33 on Billboard Pop Singles in July 30. It was on the charts for ten weeks. It's the only hit single they had ("Alone Again" charted at #99 two years later though now its Love's most known song)

It was produced by Jac Holzman and engineered by Bruce Botnick. The song took a great deal of work to record with Love's drummer, Alban "Snoopy" Pfisterer, being unable to cope with its frantic demands after 30 takes or so and being replaced on drums by Arthur Lee himself. The song climaxes in an apocalyptic explosion - the supposed sound of an atom bomb - before a peaceful conclusion, in a Blues form, before it fades out.

The song drew inspiration from a high school sweetheart of Arthur Lee's who shared his birthday, the 7th of March. It also describes Lee's frustration at teenage life - the reference to "in my lonely room I'd sit, my mind in an ice cream cone" being to wearing (in reality or metaphorically) a dunce's cap.

Described as "protopunk", it was later covered by numerous bands, most notably the Ramones, Alice Cooper, and Rush, as well as a re-recording by Lee himself.

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"Proof"

I Am Kloot

Written by John H.A. Bramwell.

Its first release was a demo as the B-side to "Morning Rain" in 2001. Then the band released their second album in 2003,"I Am Kloot" .

"Proof" is one of the four singles from this album and it was only available through download.

Its video created for it by Krishna Stott, featuring British actor Christopher Eccleston, which never received its intended, full release. A demo of "Proof" originally appeared as a B-side to "Morning Rain" in 2001.
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Thanks for participating in the gathering again peoples addemoticons450.gif

The Songfactors Choice Top Ten #227

This week there are six songs needing facts.

Hard to Handle - Otis Redding (1968)

Sandman - America (1971)

So Far Away - Dire Straits (1985)

There She Goes Again - Velvet Underground (1967)

Hush - Joe South (1969)

Liar, Liar - The Castaways (1965)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. :rock: :rock: :rock:

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"There She Goes Again"

Velvet Underground

Written by Lou Reed and recorded in April 1966.

A track of their debut album "The Velvet Underground & Nico" released in March 1967.

The syncopated guitar riff is taken from the 1962 Marvin Gaye song, "Hitch Hike", but is most likely influenced by The Rolling Stones' cover version, from their 1965 album Out of Our Heads.

There She Goes Again" is the quintessential lo-fi, jangle rock song. Driven by Lou Reed's guitar, Sterling Morrison's bass, and, in this case, the tiny percussion of Mo Tucker, the song is a showcase for Reed's vocal stylings but with a great riff and light pop refrain ("there she goes") at its core. Because the band is better known for its sonic and experimental work, "There She Goes Again" is a bit of an anomaly (though they made a handful of jangle-poppers like "Beginning to See the Light") in their rich and varied catalog. The less said about the lyric, the better. It's less than woman-friendly nature made it all the more surprising that R.E.M. recorded a straight version of the song as a B-side to the 1983 reissue of the single "Radio Free Europe" (it also appears on the CD Dead Letter Office). The song was one of the band's early live concert staples; because they also recorded the Velvets' "Pale Blue Eyes," the band is often cited as spearheading the unofficial Velvet Underground revival sparked in the '80s which resulted in the reissue of all of the band's long out-of-print recordings.
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