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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #210

This week there are two songs needing facts.

You Got It - Roy Orbinson (1989)

So Lonely - The Police (1978)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. :guitar:

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"You Got It"

Roy Orbison

A song written by Don Covey/Tom Petty/Jeff Lynne/Roy Orbison.

A track from his 1989 album "Mystery Girl", recorded one year before and produced by Jeff Lynne. Orbison was very happy with Lynne's work and even tried the change the style of the songs, (written by Bono, elvis Costello or Wesley orbison, his son) making them a bit "happier". "You Got It" reached #9 in the U.S. and # in the U.K.

It was Orbison's comeback to the charts after 24 years. Orbison died on December 6th the same year.

Allmusic doesn't agree about Lynne's production, although Orbison said that he was the best producer he ever worked with:

Song Review by Stewart Mason

Roy Orbison's comeback hit from what tragically turned out to be his farewell album, "You Got It" is basically Orbison Rutles-style. Written by Orbison, producer Jeff Lynne and their Traveling Wilburys bandmate Tom Petty, "You Got It" sounds just enough like a mythical Orbison/ Phil Spector collaboration (complete with tympani rolls, swelling strings and a perfect little acoustic guitar hook that punctuates the verses) that it's not difficult to imagine it being one of Orbison's great '60s hits. That is, it would if it weren't for Lynne's inappropriately glossy production, which dulls the song's luster just enough to keep it out of the first rank of Orbison's greatest songs. It's still easily Orbison's best single in at least two decades, and it sounded enough like his hits to attract some deserved radio attention.

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"You Got It"

Roy Orbison

A song written by Don Covey/Tom Petty/Jeff Lynne/Roy Orbison.

A track from his 1989 album "Mystery Girl", recorded one year before and produced by Jeff Lynne. Orbison was very happy with Lynne's work and even tried the change the style of the songs, (written by Bono, elvis Costello or Wesley orbison, his son) making them a bit "happier". "You Got It" reached #9 in the U.S. and # in the U.K.

It was Orbison's comeback to the charts after 24 years. Orbison died on December 6th the same year.

Allmusic doesn't agree about Lynne's production, although Orbison said that he was the best producer he ever worked with:

Song Review by Stewart Mason

Roy Orbison's comeback hit from what tragically turned out to be his farewell album, "You Got It" is basically Orbison Rutles-style. Written by Orbison, producer Jeff Lynne and their Traveling Wilburys bandmate Tom Petty, "You Got It" sounds just enough like a mythical Orbison/ Phil Spector collaboration (complete with tympani rolls, swelling strings and a perfect little acoustic guitar hook that punctuates the verses) that it's not difficult to imagine it being one of Orbison's great '60s hits. That is, it would if it weren't for Lynne's inappropriately glossy production, which dulls the song's luster just enough to keep it out of the first rank of Orbison's greatest songs. It's still easily Orbison's best single in at least two decades, and it sounded enough like his hits to attract some deserved radio attention.

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"So Lonely"

The Police

Written by Sting. Produced by Sting, Andy Summers and Stewart Copeland.

A track from their 1978 album "Outlandos d'Amour", it was released as a single in November of the same year with "No time this time" as the B-side. It was re-released in 1980, reaching #3 in the charts.

Sting has admitted that he used Bob Marley's "No Woman, No Cry" as the basis for this song:

"People thrashing out three chords didn't really interest us musically. Reggae was accepted in punk circles and musically more sophisticated, and we could play it, so we veered off in that direction. I mean let's be honest here, 'So Lonely' was unabashedly culled from 'No Woman No Cry' by Bob Marley. Same chorus. What we invented was this thing of going back and forth between thrash punk and reggae. That was the little niche we created for ourselves."

—Sting, Revolver 4/2000

Sting recycled the lyrics in the song's verses from his earlier Last Exit song "Fool in Love".

The best way to describe “So Lonely†is ‘white reggae meets new wave meets blues.’ Kinda. The song starts out sounding like a bluesy reggae number, but the chorus just kicks off into another world. A hybrid of elements from “Roxanne†and “Next To You,†“So Lonely†is a perfect example of Sting’s ability to make a sad, bluesy lyric fit into music that makes you want to wear a lot of bright colors and go drink champagne in the sunshine. He spends a great deal of the breakdown singing about how “low†he is, yet the band makes you want to pogo. The ability for a band to take a big chunk of anger and properly channel it in this manner is rare enough. For a band like the Police to do it on a regular basis is incredible. Not to mention how incredibly tight the band’s playing is. Seamless transitions from mellow reggae to high energy punk with an admittedly proggish solo from Andy Summers made this song a fan favorite. Even though it didn’t blaze up the charts like many of their tunes, it’s instantly recognizable as one of their best.
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The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #211

This week there are four songs needing facts.

What I Am - Edie Brickell and the New Bohemians (1988)

Lotta Love - Nicolette Larson

Love Song - Tesla (1989)

Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me - Mel Carter (1965)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. :bow: :bow: :bow:

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"Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me"

Mel Carter

The song was written in 1952 by Harry Noble.

Karen Chandler was the first performer to release their version in the same year and iot made the charts.

Mel Carter released his version in 1965. It was a track of his album "Hold me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me" and also a single with "Band Of Gold" as B-side. It reached #8 on Billboard Hot 100 chart and #1 on the "Easy listening" chart. This is the version heard in the 2002 film "We Were Soldiers".

allmusic said:

Mel Carter was soul music at its most vanilla, if indeed he could be characterized as a soul singer at all. Although he did record for Sam Cooke's SAR label in the early '60s, by the time he reached his commercial peak with Imperial in the middle of the decade, he was specializing in middle-of-the-road pop ballads. These actually charted considerably higher on the easy listening charts than the pop ones, his biggest smash being the Top Ten pop hit "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me" (1965), an update of a composition that predated the rock era. He had a couple of other Top 40 entries over the next year ("Band of Gold" and "(All of a Sudden) My Heart Sings"), as well as a few other big easy listening sellers, sounding at times like a more nervous and slightly up-tempo Johnny Mathis. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me" is the song he'll be remembered for, enduring as an oft-played radio oldie for decades after its release.
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"Lotta Love"

Nicolette Larson

Written by Neil Young.

Nicolette Larson released a single with her version in November 1978 with "Angels Rejoiced" as B-side. It went #8 on Billboard Hot 100 in February next year, #1 on the Easy Listening chart and was #10 Adult Contemporary hit of the year.

Larson had formed a personal relationship with Young while backing him vocally on American Stars 'n Bars; while being driven by Young in his car one day Larson played a cassette which was the demo of "Lotta Love" and Young told her the song was hers if she wanted it. Young did in fact cut a version of "Lotta Love" himself for his Comes a Time album; Larson provided background vocals for the album but did not sing on its "Lotta Love" track, a spare version which emphasized the song's melancholy.

Larson's lavish version of "Lotta Love" - which featured a string arrangement by veteran Jimmie Haskell (whose credits include work with Bobbie Gentry) plus a classic soft rock horn riff and a flute solo - presented the song as optimistic; Larson would recall: "It was a very positive song and people don't want to hear how bad the world is all the time. It had a nice sound rhythm and groove."

"Lotta Love" served as lead single for Larson's Ted Templeman-produced Nicolette album. Due to a delay in release Comes a Time was released on the same day in September 1978 as was Nicolette; the release of a single off the Nicolette album was held off until November when it was clear Young's version would not have a single release as an A-side (although Young's "Lotta Love" was released as the B-side of a non-charting "Comes a Time" single).

Much as extended dance versions of hits by the Doobie Brothers - who Templeman also produced - were released, a 12" single of Larson's "Lotta Love" was issued, with Jim Burgess performing remixing duties: this disco version differentiated from the album track and 7" single in its pure "four on the floor" disco drum track (replacing the radio version's "pop heartbeat" drum rhythm) and a sax solo on the bridge, replacing the 7" single's bridge flute solo which was shifted to an extended intro. The track did not heavily impact the club scene, its meager length for a 12" single - at 4:20 barely a minute longer than the 7" - a likely deterrent. The B-side of the 7" single was "Angels Rejoiced" featuring a harmony vocal by Herb Pederson while on its 12" single "Lotta Love" was backed by Larson's rendition of "You Send Me".

A live version of "Lotta Love" was included on the Live at the Roxy album comprising Larson's 20 December 1978 concert at the Sunset Boulevard nightclub. The album was originally a limited issue (5000 copies) promo-only release; the first full release was on Rhino in 2006.

Larson also performed "Lotta Love" at the No Nukes concerts held at Madison Square Garden in September of 1979; this version - with backing by the Doobie Brothers - was included on the No Nukes album. The performance was not included in the No Nukes film in which however Larson can be seen.

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"What I Am"

Edie Brickell and the New Bohemians

Written by Edie Brickell and Kenny Withrow. A track from Edie Brickell and the New Bohemians' 1988 debut album "Shooting Rubberbands at the Stars". It was also their first single, realeased in 1989 with "I Do" as" B-side. The 12" single had both "I Do" and "Walk on the Wildside" as B-side

The song was a hit in the US, reaching #7 on Billboard Hot 100 and # 31 in the UK.

That's all the info I have... :P

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Thank you again Edna :D :bow: :D dancekick100.gif

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #212

This week there are threee songs needing facts.

Feelin' Stronger Every Day - Chicago (1973)

It Ain't Me Babe - Bob Dylan (1964)

I Call Your Name - Mamas & Papas (1966)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. s0540.gif

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"It Ain't Me Babe"

Bob Dylan

Written by Bob Dylan.

A track from his fourth album "Another Side of Bob Dylan", released in 1964.

The song's opening line ("Go away from my window...") is allegedly influenced by musicologist/folk-singer John Jacob Niles' composition "Go 'Way From My Window." Niles is referred to by Dylan as an early influence in his autobiography, Chronicles, Vol. 1. Clinton Heylin reports that a London Times reporter at a May 1964 Royal Festival Hall concert where Dylan first played the "It Ain't Me" took the lines "no, no, no, it ain't me babe" as a parody of The Beatles' "She Loves You". When Bob Dylan played his first electric concerts at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, Carnegie Hall, The Hollywood Bowl, and Monterey in 1965, he gave "It Ain't Me, Babe" an electric arrangement.
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"I Call Your Name"

Mamas & Papas

Written by Lennon-McCartney (though John Lennon is supposed to have written the song)

The Mamas & Papas covered this song in their debut album "If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears", released in 1966.

The group closes the song with, "I call your name... ye-ah!"

:help:

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"Feeling Stronger Every Day"

Chicago

Written by Peter Cetera and James Pankow A track from their album Chicago VI, from 1973 and also the first single from the album. "Jenny" was the B-side. Released in June the same year.

The song reached #10 on Billboard 100.

According allmusic:

The funky Peter Cetera (bass/vocals) and James Pankow (trombone) ballad “Feelin' Stronger Every Day†is one of two Top Ten a-sides from Chicago VI (1973). The tune perfectly captures the fresh pop sound that made Chicago’s mid 1970s material so divergent from their early hard rocking sides and their post Terry Kath (guitar) middle-of-the-road Adult Contemporary hits. Robert Lamm (keyboards) and Danny Seraphine (drums) prominently drive the melody during the opening verses and then take a back seat as Kath and the dynamic three-piece horn section of Pankow, Lee Loughnane (trumpet) and Walter Parazaider (woodwinds) kick into overdrive during the song’s double-time conclusion. This is a similar effect to what the band would accomplish with the chart-topping “Hard To Say I’m Sorryâ€/ “Get Away†from Chicago 16 (1982). In a 1991 interview, Cetera told this reviewer that the lyrics deal with “both healing and moving on after the end of a relationship.†Although far from sombre, the more staid opening section is also a musical contrast to the freedom and abandon of the ending. “Feelin' Stronger Every Day†quickly worked its way into the live repertoire and is included on their Chicago XXVI - The Live Album (199) -- which accurately represents their post- Kath sound. Although the side became an unabashed classic, it has yet to be covered by a major label artist -- which is, to say the least, unusual.
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"I Call Your Name"

Mamas & Papas

Written by Lennon-McCartney (though John Lennon is supposed to have written the song)

The Mamas & Papas covered this song in their debut album "If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears", released in 1966.

:help:

Ahhh! I've read this in a book somewhere, now I'll have to try to find the facts to back it up .... that the Mama's & Papa's version was done as a tribute to the Beatles & Lennon in both the ending ye-ah (from the Beatle's yeah, yeah, yeah's ) to Cass whispering John's (Lennon's) name during the instrumental break. When the song was first recorded most people thought is was Michelle whispering Phillip's name .... I'll try to verify that today.

There are facts for the Beatles' original btw. Those facts do state that the song was written by Lennon alone (never mind the credits).

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"Love Song"

Tesla

Written by Frank Hannon and Jeff Keith.

A song from their 1989 album, "The Great Radio Controversy". It was released as a single and it became a hit, reaching#7 in the Mainstream Rock charts and #10 in Billboard Hot 100. It was actually the song that made Tesla famous and it could be seen very often on MTV.

When the video was placed in heavy rotation on MTV, the song rocketed to number ten on the U.S. charts, becoming one of the group's biggest hits.

The music video was filmed in the band's home town of Sacramento at the former Cal Expo amphitheater. Old 93 Rock banners can be seen hanging in the back ground.

The single and video version removes the classical guitar intro, reducing the song length to about 4:09.

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Thank you edna and Lucky for providing last weeks facts 54yh.gif

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #213

This week there are four songs needing facts.

Kind of a Drag - The Buckinghams (1967)

Black Cow - Steely Dan (19 77)

Well All Right - Blind Faith (1969)

Just Between You and Me - April Wine (1981)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution. As always the Songfish thanks you. smiley-music009-1.gif

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"Well all right"

Blind Faith

Credited to Norman Petty/Buddy Holly/JerryAllison/Joe B. Mauldin

Produced by Jimmy Miller.

A track from the supergroup Blind Faith's only album. Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker , Steve Winwood and Ric Grech formed the band in 1969, coming from bands like Cream, Traffic, Family and Spencer davies group.

:help: I know it's a Buddy Holly song...

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"Black Cow"

Steely Dan

Written by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen. The first track of their 1977 album "Aja". It was released as the B-side of the 1978 single, "Josie".

According allmusic

"Black Cow" sets the pace for the Aja album by offering up a flawless groove, inventive musical textures, and the cleanest sound known to man. Lyrically, many of the songs on Aja are full of abstract jazz references. This, of course, is not an absurd notion considering the album is perhaps the finest example of jazz-rock, especially since Becker and Fagan didn't actually hide away their admiration for jazz. The music for "Black Cow" is breezy, relaxed, and, above all, confident. Interestingly, after further investigation, the music reveals itself to be amazingly complex. Starting with a simple bass line and drums, the song builds and builds. Along the way, it is adorned with saxaphone, a flying electric piano solo, and every jazz chord in the world. Lyrically, the song's actual meaning is debatable. Some see it as a simple comment on a guy's problem with his girl. Some say it has to do with self-doubt. Others see it as a huge jazz metaphor, a commentary on nightlife. Could a black cow even be a hindu suicide drink? It has even been discussed that the song is a loose biography of Thelonious Monk. Regardless of content, the song is nearly flawless. It is a shining, crisp, delightful song. "Black Cow" is definitely a highlight for "the dan." The song complements the group's climax album, their studio masterpiece.

Rolling Stone said...

...the melodramatic "Black Cow" is about love replaced by repulsion for a woman who starts getting too strung out on downers and messing around with other men.

Edited by Guest
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"Just Between You and Me"

April Wine

Written by Myles Goodwyn.

A track from "The Nature of the Beast", their 1981 album (and the ninth). Also releasedas a single in the same year with "Big City Girls" as the B-side.

It reached #11 on the Billboard Rock Charts, #21 on Billboard Hot 100 (US) and # 13 in Canada charts.

Allmusic calls it "the band's career-defining power ballad"

Wikipedia:

The music video for this song was the fourteenth video played on MTV's first day of broadcast (August 1, 1981), making it the first video by a Canadian recording artist ever played on MTV. Played again at number fifty-seven, it's also the first video the station ever repeated
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