Jump to content
Tenacious_Peaches

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts

Recommended Posts

Dream Police

The album's title track became a Top 30 hit for the band. It is regarded by many musicians as a neglected masterpiece, a classic 70s epic marrying the superb production that had become available by then with Queen/Meatloafian melodrama, Jungian lyrics, and the emerging power pop sound.

I'm Going Home

In July 1969 they appeared at the Newport Jazz Festival, in the first event to which rock bands were invited. In August, the band performed a breakthrough American appearance at Woodstock; their furious-to-soft-to-furious rendition of "I'm Going Home" featuring Alvin Lee as the lead singer was featured in both the subsequent film and soundtrack album and catapulted them to star status.

That's all I could find... :help:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm Going Home

In July 1969 they appeared at the Newport Jazz Festival, in the first event to which rock bands were invited. In August, the band performed a breakthrough American appearance at Woodstock; their furious-to-soft-to-furious rendition of "I'm Going Home" featuring Alvin Lee as the lead singer was featured in both the subsequent film and soundtrack album and catapulted them to star status.

That's all I could find... :help:

That's a lot... :bow: I couldn' t find much info either... it was written by Alvin Lee and was released as a track on their second album, "Undead", recorded live in May at a small jazz club in London , The Klook's Kleek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #181

Just the one song:

Celluloid Heroes - The Kinks (1972)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #182

Bunch o' songs missing from Songfacts this week:

Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia) - Us3 (1993)

Fight the Power - Public Enemy (1989)

Love My Way - Psychedelic Furs (1982)

Blue Money - Van Morrison (1970)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

Thankyou and goodnight :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Love My Way"

Psychedelic Furs

Written by John Ashton/Richard Butler/Tim Butler/Vince Ely.

Released in 1982 as a single and also a track of their album "Forever Now" . It reached #44 i the US, #30 in the Billboard Charts, #42 in the UK and #23 in Australia.

From allmusic:

At once a celebration of an era, a sound and a band, "Love My Way" is one of the slyest and best singles from the early '80s, a deserved cult hit in the States well-remembered in modern rock circles. While the Psychedelic Furs' usual sound was rough post-punk sonics and dreaminess, a spiked brew not too far off from where Echo and the Bunnymen were living, when Todd Rundgren worked with the band on its Forever Now album, things shifted just enough to let this great number emerge. Featuring one of the last performances from original drummer Vince Ely before his departure, it's great for the beat alone, big and crisp without losing the groove, right down to some smart, quick fills here and there and a further punch as the song concludes. Tim Butler's bass takes more prominence over John Ashton's stripped-down semi- surf guitar line, while the various keyboard lines take the melody and lead it throughout, a synth-rocker well worthy of the name. Richard Butler's amused melancholy suits the smooth feeling -- call it the spirit of Roxy Music on "Love Is the Drug" updated a few years. Flo and Eddie's backing harmonies add the right high-pitched soothe on the choruses and especially in a brilliant performance at the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Celluloid Heroes"

The Kinks

Written by Ray Davies and released in November 1972 as a single with "Hot Potatoes" as the B-side. It's also a track of their album "Everybody's in Show Biz" and their second single from this album.

Wikipedia says that The song mentions many famous actors of 20th century film by name and also mentions Los Angeles'sHollywood Boulevard. Actors mentioned in the song include Greta Garbo, Rudolph Valentino, Bela Lugosi, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, George Sanders, and Mickey Rooney. The central theme of the song is the inhumane manner in which the Hollywood industry drains and exploits its stars, while their film images endure.

In the UK, the single features the full album version which runs to over six minutes but the US single used a more radio-friendly edit which is almost two minutes shorter. Although their previous single had been a top 20 hit on the UK singles chart, "Celluloid Heroes" failed to chart. Although not a hit single, the track received consistent airplay onAOR radio stations in the US through the 1970s and into the 1980s. Airplay in recent years has been scarce with classic rock stations favouring only the bands' top 40 hits.

Also from wiki: "Celluloid Heroes" is a firm favourite amongst Kinks aficionados, and is regarded, lyrically and melodically, as one of Davies's most mature and moving works. The song is one of the few where the talent of John Gosling (on Hammond organ) is put at the front as a key element of the song. "Celluloid Heroes" demonstrates a sensitive, emotional side to Davies's writing not often seen by those only familiar with The Kinks' generally jauntier, carefree singles output. At the time of its release, the song was one of the longest for the band, peaking at 6 minutes, while most of Davies's songs so far rarely surpassed 4 minutes. The song was a standard in their concert play lists until they disbanded in 1996 and continues to feature regularly in Ray Davies' solo shows as well as being one of the Kinks songs chosen to be re-recorded for the 2009 album The Kinks Choral Collection. Notably the song was chosen as the title track of a 1976 collection surveying the bands best-known songs while recording for the RCA label: The Kinks' Greatest: Celluloid Heroes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Blue Money"

Van Morrison

Written by Van Morrison. From his 1970 album "His Band and the Street Choir". It was released as a single in the same year with "Sweet Thing" (from the album "Astral Week") as B-side in the US, reaching #23, and "Call Me Up in Dreamland" in the UK in June 1971. It was on the charts during three months.

The Village Voice said that's a superb example of Morrison's loose, allusive white r&b.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Fight the Power"

Public Enemy

It was released as a track of the soundtrack for the film "Do the Right Thing" in 1989. The extended version was released one year later as a track of "Fear of a Black Planet", their third album, reaching #1 on Hot Rap Singles, #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on theHot R&B Singles.

From wikipedia:

Spike Lee produced and directed two music videos for this song. The first featured clips of various scenes from Do the Right Thing. In the second video, Lee used hundreds of extras to simulate a massive political rally in Brooklyn. The extras carry signs featuring Paul Robeson, Marcus Garvey, Chuck Berry and Martin Luther King. Tawana Brawley made a cameo appearance. Brawley gained national notoriety in 1987 when, at the age of 15, she accused several police officers and public officials from Wappingers Falls, New York of raping her. The charge was rejected in court, and she instead was sued for supposedly fabricating her story.

More:

It's one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, #322 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, #40 onAFI's 100 Years... 100 Songs, and #288 on Songs of the Century. "Fight the Power" was also voted #68 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of the 80s and #1 on their list of 100 greatest hiphop songs of all time.

"Fight the Power" was voted "Best Single" by the "Pazz & Jop" critics poll of 1989.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Samples used in Fight the Power:

"Yet our best trained, best educated, best equipped, best prepared troops refuse to fight! Matter of fact, it's safe to say that they would rather switch than fight!," was taken from Chicago attorney and civil rights activist, Thomas "TNT" Todd.

http://www.colorlines.com/article.php?ID=211

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #184

This week there are 4 songs needing facts. They are:

Kick It Out - Heart

Living On A Thin Line - The Kinks

Jesus Is Just Alright - The Doobie Brothers

Point of Know Return - Kansas

I will try to keep this thread running as close to the way Katie was running it as I can. She was doing such a great job I really see no reason to change a thing ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Living On A Thin Line

The Kinks

Written by Dave Davies and released as a track of their 1984 album "Word Of Mouth". The song wasn't released as a single but it's a very popular and successful song. Wikipedia says that the song was played three times in the 2001 episode University of the American TV show The Sopranos. According to producer Terence Winter on the DVD extras, it is the series' most asked about song

:help:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Point Of Know Return"

Kansas

Written by Phil Ehart, Robby Steinhardt and Steve Walsh.

The first track of their fifth album, "Point Of Know Return", released in October 1977. It was included in the album at the last moment.

It was also released as a single "which is still played daily on classic rock stations", as allmusic says. It charted at the pop charts at number 28.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Jesus Is Just Alright"

The Doobie Brothers

Written by Arthur Reid Reynolds.

Recorded first in 1969 by The Byrds -a single from their LP "Ballad of Easy Rider"- with no big success. The Underground Sunshine -a psychedelic band- covered it one year later but it didn' t even reach the charts.

In 1972 The Doobie Brothers recorded it for their album "Toulouse Street": the single was released in February 1973 and it reached #35 at the Billboard Pop Singles chart and it's still being played on classic rock radio stations. The Doobie Brothers said that "Jesus Is Just Alright" was the inspiration for "Listen To The Music", which they wrote after performing "Jesus Is Just Alright" in a church.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kick It Out ~ Heart

From Wikipedia

"Kick It Out" is a short, fast-tempo song recorded by the rock band Heart, written by Ann Wilson. It was released as the third and final single from the band's second album Little Queen in 1977. When released the song did not perform as well as previous Heart singles, reaching number seventy-nine on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. Despite a modest chart appearance, "Kick It Out" still enjoys considerable FM airplay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Living On A Thin Line

The Kinks

Written by Dave Davies and released as a track of their 1984 album "Word Of Mouth". The song wasn't released as a single but it's a very popular and successful song. Wikipedia says that the song was played three times in the 2001 episode University of the American TV show The Sopranos. According to producer Terence Winter on the DVD extras, it is the series' most asked about song

:help:

There is nothing online about this song other than what you've found edna. I don't get it it's a hugely popular song. The only other bit is that it was released on "The Sopranos: Peppers & Eggs: Music from the HBO Original Series" .

:P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone. You rock :bow: :bow: :bow:

And a big thank you to everyone that gave me tips and advice since I decided to take this on. You have all helped me feel much more comfortable and confident about volunteering to be the new facts submitter :D

and as katie would have said:

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you. :D

Maybe I should turn that part into my new signature ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is nothing online about this song other than what you've found edna. I don't get it it's a hugely popular song. The only other bit is that it was released on "The Sopranos: Peppers & Eggs: Music from the HBO Original Series" .

:P

I'm not a huge Kinks fan myself and know only a few of their songs, but Living On A Thin Line one of them.

Odd that facts for it would be so scarce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #185

This week there are 5 songs needing facts. They are:

Move Over - Janis Joplin (I have compiled facts for this one and will send them in when I send in the others. I will post them here in case there is more someone else would like to add ;) )

World I Know - Collective Soul

Blackberry Way - The Move

Mykonos - Fleet Foxes

Harvest Moon - Neil Young

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you :bow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Move Over - Janis Joplin - 1971

All Music:

Pearl

Move Over was also released on Janis Joplin's Greatest Hits is a 1973 collection of Janis Joplin hits.

The snarling blues riff copies the melody sung and written by Janis Joplin on this three minute and forty second performance which opens the Pearl album.

Recorded on the same day as "Trust Me" and "Me And Bobby McGee, September 25, 1970, fans got to see Joplin give a preview of this on the Dick Cavett Show prior to the release of Pearl. The subject matter concerns "men", as Janis told Cavett. More specifically, the guy tells her it's "over", but keeps hanging around. It's a very driving, very direct rocking blues number, the singer equating the way some guys hold out on love to a carrot stick keeping the food inches away from the mouth of a mule. "Please don't you do it to me, babe" she - not begs - but demands - "Honey, you're teasing me...I believe you're toying with my affections...I can't take it no more babe, and furthermore I don't intend to." The fading lyric is a bit salty/blasphemous with producer Paul Rothchild tucking the scat and bluesy wail inside the music as it concludes. The opening drum beat with Joplin's vocal and the guitar makes for a powerful first track, the hook built inside the song and the riff when she repeats the line "You know that I need a man". Different from anything else on the album, unlike the co-write that is "Mercedes Benz", Janis wrote "Move Over" on her own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Blackberry Way"

The Move

Written by Roy Wood. Released by the end of 1963 as a single -it's B-side was "Something"- it was produced by Jimmy Miller and it reached #1 in the UK.

Wikipedia says it' s a bleak counterpoint to the sunny psychedelia of earlier recordings.

Richard Tandy who would later play keyboards with Roy Wood's next band ELO, played harpsichord. Despite the success of the single, the style of psychedelically tinged pop sat uneasily with bassist Trevor Burton. He left the group shortly after. The bridge of "Blackberry Way" is taken from the intro of Harry Nilsson's "Good Old Desk."

The song's sound, which is reminiscent of The Beatles' "Penny Lane", off-set by its bleak lyrics ("Absolutely pouring down with rain / It's a terrible day . . . Goodbye blackberry way / I can't see you, I don't need you" ) make it a darkanswer song to the Lennon/McCartney tune.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Harvest Moon"

Neil Young

Written by Neil Young. From the album "Harvest Moon", released 20 years after "Harvest", with many of the same musicians (The Stary Gators is the back-up band) .

According allmusic, the title track

...encapsulates the mood of the entire album in a single song. The power of nature and music, as well as a feeling of celebrating lifetime love are the focal points here, and Young captures it all in his typically literate, artless style. The melody is positively gorgeous, and it's one that could have easily framed a heavier song. The fact that Young uses the word "celebrate" underlines his feelings here, and the exquisite arrangement and backing vocals (which include Linda Ronstadt) underline this.

Neil Young on guitar, banjo-guitar, piano, pump organ, vibes, vocals; Kenny Buttrey on drums, Tim Drummond on bass, marimba, broom; Ben Keith on pedal steel guitar, dobro, bass marimba, vocals.

Wikipedia says that among the track highlights are the title track, featuring the percussive sweeping of a broom, a song for which Young made a rare music video.

Cassandra Wilson made a cover for her 1995 album while Pearl Jam played it live in their 2005 tour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...