Jump to content
Tenacious_Peaches

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts

Recommended Posts

"Low" - Cracker

Written by Davey Faragher/Johnny Hickman/David Lowery.

A track from their 1993 album "Kerosene Hat" and also a single, it went to #3 on Billboard chart -Modern Rock- in November 1993 and #5 on the Mainstream Rock chart in March next years.

It also reached #43 in the UK charts.

:help:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Harmony" - Elton John

Written by Elton John/Bernie Taupin, a track of his double album "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road" from 1973.

It was released as the B-side of the single "Bennie and the Jets", in the US in February 1974 as well as in "Pinball Wizard", the single from the movie "Tommy" in 1976 . It's the last track of the album.

Line up:

Elton John (vocals, piano); Nigel Olsson on drums and backing vocals; Dee Murray on bass and backing vocals;

Davey Johnstone on acoustic guitar and backing vocals;

Orchestral arrangement by Del Newman.

Podudec by Gus Dudgeon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you edna :bow: I was just coming in to try to finish last weeks facts. Nice to see you back in here :D

Shannon and Pinkstones your input is greatly appreciated also :D

Keep up the good work peeps ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #190

This week there is only 1 song needing facts.

Sugar Magnolia - Grateful Dead(1970)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Sugar Magnolia" is a song by the Grateful Dead. Written by Robert Hunter and Bob Weir, it is one of the most well-known songs by the band, alongside such hits as "Truckin'," "Casey Jones," "Uncle John's Band," and "Touch of Grey."

First released on the 1970 album American Beauty, "Sugar Magnolia" made its live debut on June 7, 1970 at the Fillmore West in San Francisco. When performed live, the song was often divided into two different entities: "Sugar Magnolia" proper and the "Sunshine Daydream" coda. The break between the two could be a few beats, a set, or even a few concerts. On one memorable occasion, the week of long-time friend of the band Bill Graham's death, the coda was held off for an entire week.[1]

According to Deadbase X, "Sugar Magnolia" was the Dead's second-most played in concert song of their long career, with 596 performances, trailing only "Me & My Uncle".

It has been said that the song was written about Bob Weir's girlfriend, Frankie, who lived with him for many years. In any case, the song's line "she don't come and I won't follow" echoes the folk song, "Sourwood Mountain", which includes the line "she won't come and I won't call 'er." Aside from obvious references to several types of plants (magnolia), the line "jump like a Willys in four wheel drive" refers to the Willys Jeep, which was actually "jumped" off the ground by some drivers. [smithsonian, November 1992]

Two facts that don't need to make it into the main page-

1-Sugar Magnolia is my personal second favorite Grateful Dead song

2-Has the very famous mondegreen-"Bakes my chicken when I sleep" and variations there of for the actual lyric "Pays my ticket when I speed."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #191

This week there is 5 songs needing facts.

Everlasting Love - Carl Carlton

Ride My See-Saw - The Moody Blues

Could It Be I'm Falling In Love - The Spinners

Blue Bayou - Linda Ronstadt

Devil Inside - INXS

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. :bow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blue Bayou - Linda Ronstadt

I'm submitting facts for the Roy Orbison version, as it it the original, and the Linda version as it is also well known. Both versions are now in the T T, but neither has facts.

"Blue Bayou" is the title of a song written by Roy Orbison and Joe Melson and sung by Orbison. The best known version remains Linda Ronstadt's 1977 cover, which was a top-ten pop, country and easy listening single in the U.S.; the song was included on Ronstadt's Triple-Platinum-Plus Simple Dreams album.

Linda Ronstadt took the song to #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in late 1977 - as well as #2 Country and #3 Easy Listening. The single was RIAA certified Gold (for sales of over 1 million US copies) in early 1978. It was later certified Platinum (for over 2 million US copies sold). It was also popular in a Spanish-language version called "Lago Azul".

Because of this song, Dickson's Baseball Dictionary records that a "Linda Ronstadt" is a synonym for a fastball, a pitch that "blew by you."

As was the case with many of Roy Orbison's lyrics, "Blue Bayou" told a sad story, one of loss, nostalgia, and heartbreak. Yet, unlike most such Orbison songs to dwell on such topics, the music of the track is gently happy-go-lucky. The charming melody and lazy, swinging pace ooze not so much despair as a return to happier times, on a swinging hammock on a lazy afternoon by the river, perhaps. The arrangement is understated but effective, starting off with just a drum and a bass (and we don't mean drum and bass electronic rhythms here!), then adding softly swaying female backup vocals. Those backup vocals are especially good when the song comes to a dead stop, the women getting things back in motion again by crooning the song's title. While Orbison's singing conveys sadness, it's muted in comparison to his most melodramatic hits, and tempered by an odd sense of anticipation, almost, of revisiting the Blue Bayou where he lost his girl. A breezy harmonica on the latter parts of the verses adds to the sense of wistful longing, as do the softly descending female harmonies in this section, while the use of soft harpsichord is in keeping with the attention to detail and sophistication that marked Orbison's Monument recordings. "Blue Bayou" was actually a B-side of the big hit "Mean Woman Blues," though it reached the Top 30 under its own steam, and was the bigger hit on the 45 in Britain, where it made number three. It became an American number three hit for Linda Ronstadt in 1977, when she made it one of many oldies she revived into hits of her own in the 1970s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everlasting Love - Carl Carlton

The hallmark of a great song is when it can be covered by different artists of different genres and still retain its original flavor. Written by Buzz Cason and Mac Gayden, "Everlasting Love" had three hit covers. The original 1967 version performed by Robert Knight and produced by the songwriting duo broke the Top Ten of both the R&B and pop charts. Carl Carlton's 1974 disco-tized cover broke the pop Top Ten and the R&B Top 20. Rex Smith performed a duet with Rachel Sweet on the 1981 pop/rock single that became a Top 40 pop hit. Of the three, Carlton's cover is the most remembered in modern times, appearing on numerous compilations and used as a the musical bed for CBS-TV sports promos in fall 2000. Under three minutes and produced by Papa Don ( James & Bobby Purify's "'I'm Your Puppet"), it's disappointingly short, though they didn't stop it from being a huge disco hit. Percolating plunked guitars pulsate against a sizzling "Shaft"-like high hat, setting the stage for the Detroit native's supple, soulful vocals, soaring background vocals, and a sensational string and horn arrangement.

And might I add that man had one juicy Gheri Curl :afro:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everlasting Love" is a song written by Buzz Cason and Mac Gayden. The song was first a hit for soul singer Robert Knight in 1967. It was also recorded by several other artists in the years since. The song was a Top 10 hit for Carl Carlton in 1974 (becoming the most popular version), a Top 40 hit for Rex Smith and Rachel Sweet in 1981, a Top 10 Album rock song for U2 in 1989, and a Top 10 hit for Gloria Estefan in 1995.

According to Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI), the 1974 Carl Carlton version has been played more than 4 million times. It is also considered one of the earliest successful disco songs on the pop charts, and was featured in the second installment of the popular Pure Disco CD compilation series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I freaking love Everlasting Love. It's one of my top five "makes me happy songs". I forgot about the Gloria Estefan version. I just may have to put both of them on my next originals/covers CD. Thanks Phil :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could it be I'm Falling in Love" is a 1972 song recorded by the American R&B vocal group The Spinners (known as "Detroit Spinners" in the UK). The song was co-written by Melvin and Mervin Steals and produced by Thom Bell. Bobbie Smith sings lead through most of the song while Philippé Wynne handles vocal duties on the song's outro. Released as the follow-up single to the group's first hit for Atlantic Records, I'll Be Around, Could it be I'm Falling in Love would equal the success of its predecessor, peaking at number one on the R&B chart and number four on the Pop chart [1]. and selling over one million copies. The song also found success in the UK, peaking at number eleven on the UK Singles Chart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Devil Inside - INXS

Having conquered airwaves worldwide with "Need You Tonight," INXS had to make sure that the follow-up would build on strengths instead of just providing more of the same. "Devil Inside" provided a commanding answer, exchanging the spare tension of the earlier song for a slightly more full and faster but no less snaky and involved performance that practically drips sex and attractive threat in equal amounts. The heavily distorted lead guitar melody that led into the song proper makes for a perfect, immediately memorable hook, while Michael Hutchence's observation of mating rituals of the modern day is both good-natured and quietly anticipatory thanks to his subtle handling of the verses. The choruses really provide the payoff, as his understated, breathy delivery there leads into him and the band really letting loose, firing up and out with more and more power as the song continues. Not much else at the time worked such magic on the radio (and hearing Hutchence almost offhandedly say "Makes me wonder, wonder, wonder" at one point shows how he could make even a throwaway moment sound great).

"Devil Inside" is a song by Australian band INXS. The song was written by Andrew Farriss and Michael Hutchence and is one of INXS's best known songs.

It was released as a single in February 1988.

The song is well remembered for its catchy riff and Michael Hutchence's whisper of the lyrics.

The song went to #2 on the Billboard 100 in the United States, #47 in the United Kingdom, #20 in France, #25 in Ireland and #6 in Australia.

Guitarist and saxophone player Kirk Pengilly stated in an interview that he did not like the music video for "Devil Inside," because he thought that it was "too American."

The video was filmed in Balboa, California and directed by Joel Schumacher.

The song was featured in the 2001 movie Rock Star.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Phil and Shannon... :)

I don't have much time lately after all the complications in my life -though we're doing better- but I hope I will be able to post facts again very soon... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Ride My See-Saw"

The Moody Blues

A song written by John Lodge (bass player in the band).

Released in October 1968.

It was the second single taken from their 1968 LP, "In Search of the Lost Chord" "A Simple Game" was the B-side in the UK while in the US it was "Voices In The Sky".

From wiki:

"Ride My See-Saw" is one of John Lodge's signature high-energy rock and roll songs, and is sometimes regarded as his most popular composition for the Moody Blues, along with "I'm Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band)."

At most of the Moody Blues' concerts, "Ride My See-Saw" is the encore presentation at the end of the shows. When performed live, it is usually opened by a lengthy keyboard and drum duet as the band members make their way back out to the stage for the encore.

"Ride My See-Saw" was also another piece of recording history made by the Moody Blues. It was one of the first rock singles ever to be recorded on 8 track multi-track recording. While 8 track had been used on albums before (notably on the Moodies own AOR classic Days Of Future Passed) it was not really considered for a single until the time that See Saw was recorded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everlasting Love" is a song written by Buzz Cason and Mac Gayden. The song was first a hit for soul singer Robert Knight in 1967. It was also recorded by several other artists in the years since. The song was a Top 10 hit for Carl Carlton in 1974 (becoming the most popular version), a Top 40 hit for Rex Smith and Rachel Sweet in 1981, a Top 10 Album rock song for U2 in 1989, and a Top 10 hit for Gloria Estefan in 1995.

According to Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI), the 1974 Carl Carlton version has been played more than 4 million times. It is also considered one of the earliest successful disco songs on the pop charts, and was featured in the second installment of the popular Pure Disco CD compilation series.

Actually, in Europe the most famous version is the one by Love Affair.

Also from wikipedia:

Robert Knight's original version, however, was easily eclipsed in the United Kingdom when Love Affair's version (CBS 3125, b/w "Gone are the Songs of Yesterday" (Phillip Goodhand-Tait) topped the UK singles chart in 1968. Their version entered the UK chart on 3 January that year, and that by Knight on 17 January, for two weeks, reaching no higher than No. 40. It had previously been offered to Marmalade, another group on CBS, but they rejected it as they thought it too pop-oriented for them. Knight's version was re-issued in the UK, and fared better on the chart in its reissue in the spring of 1974 when it rose to No. 19.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #192

This week there are 5 songs needing facts.

You Make Me Feel Like Dancing - Leo Sayer

C'mon C'mon - Von Bondies

Cuts Like A Knife - Bryan Adams

Night Time Is The Right Time - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Have A Little Faith In Me - John Hiatt

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you. :bow: :bow: :bow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #192

You Make Me Feel Like Dancing - Leo Sayer

"You Make Me Feel Like Dancing" is a popular song by the British singer Leo Sayer, taken from his 1976 album Endless Flight. The song reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart,[1] making it his first number one single in United States, and #2 on the UK Singles Chart.[2] Songwriters Sayer and Vini Poncia won a Grammy Award for the song in 1978 in the category Best R&B Song.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Night Time Is The Right Time ~ CCR

"Night Time Is the Right Time" is a blues standard that has been interpreted and recorded by a variety of music artists. First recorded in 1937 by Roosevelt Sykes, a.k.a. "The Honeydripper," the song features the memorable refrain "Because night time, is the right time, to be with the one you love" towards the end of each twelve-bar verse.

Covered by Creedence Clearwater Revival on their studio album Green River (1969), and on their live album The Concert (1980).

From Wiki...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Songfactors' Choice Top Ten #192

Have A Little Faith In Me - John Hiatt

"Have a Little Faith in Me" is a song written and performed by John Hiatt that appears on his 1987 album Bring the Family. It is featured on the soundtrack of the 1993 romantic comedy Benny & Joon. The song has been covered separately by Michael English, Joe Cocker, Delbert McClinton, Chaka Kahn, Mandy Moore, Patty Larkin, Bill Frisell, Jo-El Sonnier, Ilse DeLange and Jewel for the 1996 film soundtrack Phenomenon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Cuts Like A Knife"

Bryan Adams

Written by B.Adams and Jim Vallance.

Released as a track from his third album "Cuts Like A Knife", in January 1983, and as a single two months later with "Lonely Nights" as the B-side reaching #6 on Billboard Rock chart and #15 on Billboard Hot 100.

Wikipedia:

In an interview in 1988 with Vancouver's Georgia Straight newspaper, Adams explained how Vallance and he came up with the title for the song:

"I think that I'm one of the world's best mumblers, I can mumble some of the best lyrics, but putting them together is another story. I think that's where Jim is really good -- he can piece a story together. It's just a good thing to have the tape rolling when you're recording me. The best example was when we wrote "Cuts Like A Knife", which was just literally a mumble. We looked at each other, rolled the tape back, and it sounded like "cuts like a knife", so we started singing that."

Adams and Vallance jammed on the chord progression for a while Adams sang "it cuts like a knife" over and over again. Vallance eventually responded with "but it feels so right". As Vallance described it, "There's a long tradition in pop music of songs that employ "na-na-na" choruses: "Hey Jude" by The Beatles, "Na-Na, Hey-Hey, Kiss Him Goodbye" bySteam, "Lovin, Touchin, Squeezin" by Journey, and more recently "Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)" by Train. Adams and I tapped into that tradition for the out-choruses of 'Cuts Like A Knife'."

From allmusic:

"More of an anthemic rocker than the previous power ballad hit, "Straight from the Heart," "Cuts Like a Knife" breaks absolutely no new ground lyrically or musically, but as with his previous hit, Adams here proves his worth as both a singer and songwriter."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"C'mon C'mon"

Von Bondies

Written by Jason Stollsteimer. A track from their 2nd album "Pawn Shoppe Heart", released in 2004. It was their debut with the major label Sire and was produced by Jerry Harrison.

Wikipedia says that

a shortened version of "C'mon C'mon" is the theme song for the American comedy-drama television show, Rescue Me. It is featured on the EA videogames "Burnout 3: Takedown" and "MVP Baseball 2004"... MLB Network uses a brief clip of "C'mon C'mon" as the opening of their new show 30 Clubs in 30 Days.

...it was released as downloadable content for Rock Band and Rock Band 2 on March 31, 2009 for Xbox 360 and April 2, 2009 for PS3. This track became available as DLC for the Wii version of Rock Band 2 on Tuesday April 7, 2009 for 2 dollars (200 Wii Points).

From allmusic:

The excellent, exhilarating single "C'Mon C'Mon" alone justifies the Von Bondies' jump to a major label and the attendant major recording budget: its quick-shifting dynamics, call-and-response vocals, and poppy sheen make it not only the best and most distinctive song the Von Bondies have yet recorded, but one of the best singles of 2004. In fact, "C'Mon C'Mon" is so good that it nearly dwarves the rest of Pawn Shoppe Heart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...