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FreedomRider

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About FreedomRider

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    tadpole
  • Birthday 07/20/1954
  1. Hey this is an old thread, but I couldn't resist. Have to agree that PF wasn't the most technical band, in terms of their musicianship, but of course that has only a little to do with their greatness. It's what they were trying to communicate and how they did it that makes them unique. And they were fortunate that they emerged at a time when they were able to get their music recorded and into the market before the commercial recording industry squelched their creativity. That of course eventually happened in the mid-seventies, when we start to see the sun set on the innovators. The core of their work began with Piper and extended throug DSOTM, in my opinion (which others have said too). Albums like Atom Heartmother, UmmaGumma and Meddle are truly groundbreaking feats of communication that we are unlikely to see repeated in our lifetimes. It's the spirit and soul of Pink Floyd that comes shining through those albums (in some weird and even frightening ways). Special people in a special place in a special time. I saw them on April 23, 1972 in Cincinnati. Absolutely stunningly performance, far and away the most amazing musical (or other) performance I have ever seen. "Echoes" in Music Hall - amazing.
  2. Well both bands were very creative, but the Moodies in my opinion covered a lot more ground. Procol was interesting but I always thought they were a little more on the gimmicky side, like on the album "Shine on Brightly". Musically their constructions were a lot different, the Moodies had quite a few classical influences, while Procol had a harder edge. Ulimate Moodies album was the psychedelic masterpiece "To Our Childrens Childrens Children", (1969?) not as well know as some of their more commercial stuff but in my opinion the peak of their creativity. Oh yeah, and Repent Walpurgis brings back some fond memories - a local radio station always used it as the intro to their "progressive rock" program.
  3. Thanks Laurie. I need to get out and see Neil in concert again before he kicks the bucket. Have to believe he won't be touring much longer - hope I'm wrong.
  4. Hi, I saw GFR several times back in 1970 - 1972. They brought a huge amount of energy to their concerts, and the band I played in covered their songs a lot (mainly because they were all three chords and a cloud of dust). They were freaking LOUD too; not sure if they used Marshall or Carvin, but it had to be 120 DB near the speakers. Mark Farner was not the greatest guitarist from a pure technical point of view but man he could crank out some energy. I think someone posted some youtube links, there are some great clips of those early concerts. Just go to youtube.com and type in "Grand Funk Railroad". Oh, and then they began to really stink up the place with the commercially successful "We're an American Band". In my opinion, of course. But maybe not just mine because they didn't do a whole lot after that.
  5. Hi, I'm no expert but from what I have seen is is pretty much that same as all collectibles - condition and rarity. Only one that I have that has much value is a decent copy of the original "Neil Young" album. I think the value is higher because it was a fairly limited pressing. Maybe another decade or so to get to peak value for the vinyl? You have to wonder when all we all start dying off if there will really be much of a market out there. Sort of like ther isn't a big market for 78 RPM records of 1920's foxtrots these days.
  6. Hi Jane - Alan Parsons Project was great! Pyramid album... The Eagle Will Rise Again, wow that song was amazing. Listened to it many times. These guys were greatly underrated.
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