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The Songfactor's Choice: Best Soundtracks

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I didn´t nominate this album in the old MoC thread, but somebody did. I hope you don´t mind if I choose to nominate it?

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"Grease"

A nice little story with nice easy songs, yet a movie and an album that was very important for a generation: mine. :)

Barry Gibb, Frankie Valli, John Travolta (third appearence in this MoC) and lots of songs by Sha-na-na for one of the best soundtracks of the 70s. So pop, so kitsch, so innocent...

Side 1

1. Grease (Barry Gibb)

Frankie Valli

2. Summer Nights( Jim Jacobs & Warren Casey)

John Travolta/Olivia Newton-John & Cast

3. Hopelessly Devoted to You (John Farrar)

Olivia Newton-John

4. You’re The One That I Want (John Farrar)

John Travolta/Olivia Newton-John

5. Sandy (Louis St. Louis/Scott Simon)

John Travolta

Side 2

1. Beauty School Dropout (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

Frankie Avalon

2. Look At Me, I’m Sandra Dee (Jim Jacobs/ Warren Casey)

Stockard Channing

3. Greased Lightnin' (Jim Jacobs /Warren Casey)

John Travolta & Jeff Conaway

4. It’s Raining on Prom Night (Jim Jacobs /Warren Casey)

Cindy Bullens

5. Alone at a Drive-In Movie (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

(instrumental)

6. Blue Moon(Rodgers/Hart)

Sha Na Na

Side 3

1. Rock n' Roll is Here to Stay (Dave White)

Sha Na Na

2. Those Magic Changes (Jim Jacobs /Warren Casey)

Sha Na Na

3. Hound Dog (Leiber/Mike Stoller)

Sha Na Na

4. Born To Hand Jive (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

Sha Na Na

5. Tears on My Pillow (Sylvester Bradford/Al Lewis)

Sha Na Na

6. Mooning (Jim Jacobs /Warren Casey)

Louis St. Louis and Cindy Bullens

Side 4

1. Freddy, My Love (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

Cindy Bullens

2. Rock n' Roll Party Queen (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

Louis St. Louis

3. There are Worse Things I Could Do (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

Stockard Channing

4. Look At Me, I’m Sandra Dee (Reprise) (Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey)

Olivia Newton-John

5. We Go Together (Jim Jacobs & Warren Casey)

John Travolta/Olivia Newton-John & Cast

6. Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing (Fain /Webster)

(Instrumental)

7. Grease (Reprise)

(Barry Gibb)

Frankie Valli

"You´re the one that I want" is my fave. It reached #1 in the Billboard Charts in 1978, when the movie and the album were released. A simple song to dance in times where disco seemed to be the only option, but not the right one for those who were deep into rock. Time has made disco sound like "those good old days" for some of us, and for me, this song was the trigger for a new point of view.

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I love those moments in a film where the director finds the perfect song, and the scene sticks with you for the rest of your life. Sometimes it's a song created specifically for the movie, and other times it's an old favorite brought back to life.

Selective memory may interfere with my facts, but I know what I felt when I saw Top Gun. This movie has 3 songs that within the context of the movie are just perfect:

1) Danger Zone by Kenny Loggins

Dialogue is a tricky thing. Lines like "I've got the need, the need for speed" can get you laughed off the schoolyard if you don't sell them, but delivered with the appropriate confidence and swagger (and a nice pair of Ray-Bans), you'll buy it big time. Songs are dialoge set to music (this according to Jim Peterik), and Kenny Loggins delivers. Just as Val Kilmer had so make me believe that "You can be my wingman anytime," Loggins had to make me feel the rush of excitement and take me to the sky:

"Out along the edges

Always where I burn to be

The further on the edge

The hotter the intensity"

2) Take My Breath Away - Berlin

The love theme for the greatest movie of the '80s used the ultimate '80s instrument - the synthesizer - to make a noise that let us know Maverick was going to get the girl. Talk about foreplay - how about that extended drone the leads into these lyrics, sung with the requisite conviction by Terri Nunn:

"Watching every motion

In my foolish lover's game

On this endless ocean

Finally lovers know no shame"

3) You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling

Nowadays, singing this song at Karaoke is like yelling "Freebird" at a concert, but that's because Tom Cruise made it so. There is no better song to show off your limited vocal range and get her attention than this Righteous Brothers classic.

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Easy Rider: Music From The Soundtrack

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Released 1969/Various Artists

1. The Pusher - Steppenwolf

2. Born To Be Wild - Steppenwolf

3. The Weight - Smith

4. Wasn't Born To Follow - The Byrds

5. If You Want To Be A Bird - The Holy Modal Rounders

6. Don't Bogart Me (AKA Don't Bogart That Joint) - Fraternity Of Man

7. If Six Was Nine - The Jimi Hendrix Experience

8. Kyrie Eleison/Mardi Gras (When The Saints) - The Electric Prunes

9. It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding) - Roger McGuinn

10. Ballad Of Easy Rider - Roger McGuinn

Easy Rider was not just a great film, but an important one. It was probably the first to utilize Rock for it's soundtrack and score (Midnight Cowby and The Graduate did as well, but with softer sounds). This was THE film for a generation. It's a listening experience, and each track was meaningful to the film, not just included for the sake of the song.

Born To Be Wild (Opening Sequence) was an anthem for the times, and remains a classic today. The Roger McGuinn Ballad of Easy Rider (Ending Sequence, song at 3:30) tells you the emotions and feelings that drove the film. The rest of the tracks provide a glimpse into that era of the sixties that you had to experience to understand.

I've seen the film at least 10 times, and have worn out an LP, and an 8 track playing the Soundtrack. There was a remastered version released in 2004, which is good, as it includes an additional 10 songs and the original Band version of "The Weight", but other than that, the songs don't have any correlation to the film. It sure sounds good though!

Edited by Guest
Put the wrong youtube clip in

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^^^^^Excellent Choice Lucky!

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1. The Sound Of Silence - Simon And Garfunkel

2. The Singleman Party Foxtrot - David Grusin

3. Mrs. Robinson - Simon And Garfunkel

4. Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha - David Grusin

5. Scarborough Fair / Canticle (Inerlude) - Simon And Garfunkel

6. On The Strip - David Grusin

7. April Come She Will - Simon And Garfunkel

8. The Folks - David Grusin

9. Scarborough Fair / Canticle - Simon And Garfunkel

10. A Great Effect - David Grusin

11. The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine - Simon And Garfunkel

12. Whew - David Grusin

13. Mrs. Robinson - Simon And Garfunkel

14. The Sound Of Silence - Simon And Garfunkel

Loved the movie, love Dustin, love Simon and Garfunkel! Not too often you hear all of one artist through out a movie, and Simon and Garfunkel's harmony is perfect for this movie...Whenever I hear the song Mrs. Robinson, I always think of this movie, and the classic line "You're trying to seduce me arent you Mrs Robinsons?"...or something like that..(too lazy to look up the exact quote)

:P

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The Virgin Suicides

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More here about the movie here.

There are two soundtracks for this movie, the original score written by Air, and this one which features music from the movie.

Soundtrack Listing:

1. Magic Man - Heart

2. Hello It's Me - Todd Rundgren

3. Everything You've Done Wrong - Sloan

4. Ce Matin La - Air

5. The Air That I Breathe - The Hollies

6. How Can You Mend A Broken Heart? - Al Green

7. Alone Again Naturally - Gilbert O'Sullivan

8. I'm Not In Love - 10cc

9. A Dream Goes On Forever - Todd Rundgren

10. Crazy On You - Heart

11. Playground Love - Air

12. Come Sail Away - Styx

I think the songs by Heart are used particularly well in this movie, and are my favourite.

There is a scene in the movie where the Lisbon sisters, who are locked inside their house, ring the neighbourhood boys and they take it in turns to play records to each other down the phone line, letting the music say the words that both sides seem unable to speak. Can't find and video clips of this though.

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"All the Right Friends" R.E.M. – 2:46

"Everything in Its Right Place" Radiohead – 4:09

"Vanilla Sky" Paul McCartney - 2:46

"Solsbury Hill" Peter Gabriel – 4:23

"I Fall Apart" Julianna Gianni – 3:52

"Porpoise Song (Theme From 'Head')" The Monkees – 2:52

"Mondo '77" Looper – 4:53

"Have You Forgotten" Red House Painters – 5:28

"Directions" Josh Rouse - 3:24

"Afrika Shox" Leftfield – 3:44

"Svefn-G-englar" Sigur Rós - 9:15

"Last Goodbye" Jeff Buckley - 4:33

"Can We Still Be Friends" Todd Rundgren - 3:34

"4th Time Around" Bob Dylan - 4:35

"Elevator Beat" Nancy Wilson - 2:44

"Sweetness Follows" R.E.M. - 4:19

"Where Do I Begin" The Chemical Brothers - 6:29

This wonderful film had such great music, both old and new. Favourite song from the soundtrack: Solsbury Hill by Peter Gabriel. I don't remember exactly the movie scenes that played the different songs, but a favourite one is where they recreate the cover of Dylan's Freewheeling album. 4th Time Around is also one of Dylan's most beautiful songs. A rather weird plot: you don't know if the protagonist is dead, alive or just dreaming until the very end, and then you want to see it again.

Edited by Guest

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"Somebody's Baby" (Jackson Browne)

"Waffle Stomp" (Joe Walsh)

"Love Rules" (Don Henley)

"Uptown Boys" (Louise Goffin)

"So Much in Love" (Timothy B. Schmit)

"Raised on the Radio" (The Ravyns)

"The Look in Your Eyes" (Gerard McMahon)

"We Got the Beat" (Go-Go's)

"Don't Be Lonely" (Quarterflash)

"Never Surrender" (Don Felder)

"Fast Times (The Best Years of Our Lives)" (Billy Squier)

"Fast Times at Ridgemont High" (Sammy Hagar)

"I Don't Know (Spicoli's Theme)" (Jimmy Buffett)

"Love Is the Reason" (Graham Nash)

"I'll Leave It up to You" (Poco)

"Highway Runner" (Donna Summer)

"Sleeping Angel" (Stevie Nicks)

"She's My Baby (And She's Outta Control)" (Jost Palmer)

"Goodbye, Goodbye" (Oingo Boingo)

"Everybody's Girl" (Rick Springfield)

This was the teen movie of the '80s. And just look at the amount of big names and talent collected here on one album. I mean, Jimmy Buffett wrote a song specifically for this album.

Probably my favorite (naturally) is Stevie Nicks' "Sleeping Angel." In the scene where Stacy is waiting for her ride to the clinic, the words from this song are playing... "These love affairs are heavy spells for a woman and a man..." perfect. This is the song that caused me to buy the album - just to find there are so many other great songs on it.

Jackson Browne's song was a big hit, as was the Go-Go's. I also loved "Raised On The Radio" by the Ravyns, a band which I'd never heard of before or since.

It's rumored that the character of Ratner was a real-life guy and that he's now a producer/director. I've seen movies with the name Brett Ratner mentioned in the credits and wondered if that were him...

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Pink Floyd - Obscured By Clouds

A beautiful soundtrack that is unjustly forgotten, but any fan of DSOTM should really hear this at least once in their lives.

Track listing:

1) Obscured By Clouds

2) When You're In

3) Burning Bridges

4) The Gold It's In The

5) Wot's... Uh The Deal (Best song.)

6) Mudmen

7) Childhood's End

8) Free Four

9) Stay

10) Absolutely Curtains

Didn't I mention earlier that quite a lot of Pink Floyd music sounds 'soundtrackish'? Well then, no wonder this is their second genuine soundtrack album in four years (third, actually, if you count the few compositions in Zabriskie Point). And being a soundtrack, it's no wonder nobody ever pays much attention to it. Neither did I at first - this was the last Floyd album I ever bought, yes, even later than the post-Waters celebrations of mediocrity. And oh what fools, total fools are we, and what a particular fool I have been.

Actually, most of these things were recorded during the Dark Side sessions - they'd already played the first preliminary Dark Side concerts before this one came out. So quite a lot of these songs sound much alike the better known ones, and it's much closer to Dark Side, in fact, than Meddle. Meddle solidified their 'experimental' side, with sound effects, tricky production values and groovy synth lines that all came up later in 1973; Obscured By Clouds is much more important, however (to me at least) in that it neglects the experimentation in favour of search for good melodies, thus presaging the melodical side of DSOTM. And forgive me for my heresy, but I say it loud and I don't say it just for fun: most of the melodies on DSOTM don't hold a candle to this forgotten soundtrack. Yup, I'm serious. There are ten songs on here, and about two thirds of them contain some of the most attractive music I ever heard from Pink.

The instrumentals are mostly superior, like the immediately-pleasant title track that sets the necessary gloomy, "pre-apocalyptic" atmosphere with its gritty synth patterns and Gilmour's patented dentistry, and 'When You're In' that it segues into: the latter, in particular, subdues me with its minimalism, showing that sometimes a pair of three-chord riffs can provide a larger emotional flurry than a solo of six billion lightning-speed notes. And 'Mudmen' features one of the few examples of Gilmour the Dentist soloing that is, you know, great to listen to. Again, essentially just a lot of atmosphere, moody, relaxed atmosphere - but a really really sympathetic atmosphere. Like on More, you know, only less frigged out - more accent on playing than on making sound. Maybe it's the fact that this album was recorded in two weeks time that helps the music so much? Surely they just didn't have time to spoil all of these numbers, to feed them up with dated sound effects? Yeah, that's probably it. They just hastily put together some half-baked (but more than half-brilliant) melodies and pushed them forward without much afterthought. In the process they created a minor and underrated masterpiece.

Yup, you can really see quite a lot of DSOTM traces on here. Take Gilmour's 'Childhood End', for instance. Do you really want to tell me that this song is not based on the same musical (and lyrical, by the way) ideas as 'Time'? Come on now, it even features the same "clock-work" drum pattern in the beginning! And the fascinating 'Wot's... Uh The Deal', with its lyrics about getting old and melody that would fit on DSOTM as easy as anything? I tell you, whoever adores DSOTM and neglects this one is making a fatal mistake. Forget the hype and agree with me that this is, well, maybe not a better, but easily just as good a record. Only without the clocks and the beating heart and the clanging cash registers and the flying beds... get my drift?

Now, of course, there are some misfires on the album, or I would have given it a higher rating. The closing instrumental 'Absolutely Curtains' is way too flaccid for my tastes, and the New Guinea aborigines' singing at the end is a silly extract from the film (something about disillusioned hippies coming to dwell among primitive people, I think; I've never seen it, of course, and I don't have the least desire to look for it) that lasts way too long for it to form a simple forgettable gimmicky coda - instead, it just goes on and on for ages, as if they thought that any fan of Pink Floyd should naturally be a tribal music lover as well. Same goes for Wright's 'Stay', another so-so pop ballad in the vein of 'Summer '68' and even based on the same lyrical subject ('strange' relations between man and woman).

But the other songs, good, uh oh, some even great - they all compensate for that, like 'Burning Bridges' that gives us the pleasure of hearing 'Echoes' reprised once again (and serves as a natural precursor to 'Breathe', too); the hilarious upbeat hard rocker 'The Gold It's In The...'; and a Waters' throwaway called 'Free Four' that might have passed for silly country if not for the ominous synth notes at the end of each phrase and Roger's bitter lament for his dead father, full of hideous death imagery, that stands so glaringly at odds with the lightweight, happy melody. They are not spectacular, of course. There are no DSOTM-like 'climaxes', and the arrangements are often elementary - but I guess that's exactly the reason that makes me like this one so much. The lack of pretension. The lack of universalism. Good, clear guitars. Minimum electronics. And, of course, absolutely no hype or all that 'greatest rock album in the world' stuff. Funny. It's like, you know, a little brother to Dark Side - less proud, less braggart, and less handsome, but just as diligent and laborious.

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Oh, so you are Only Solitaire? :shades: I don´t remember that poster... but you reminded me of "More", I love that soundtrack, I might nominate it next time...

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The guidelines will change with each edition. So Welcome To.....

THE SONGFACTOR'S MUSIC of CHOICE: Volume 1: SOUNDTRACKS

*What we'd like is for you to nominate a great Soundtrack. To change it up a bit, instead of reviewing the album, we'd like for you to choose one song from that Soundtrack to highlight. Tell us how that song makes the scene it corresponds to work. Why is it memorable? How does it make you feel? Why do you think of the film everytime you hear the song? Get it? Got It? Good! ;)

Super Ry -

This was in the initial post.

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AMERICAN GRAFFITI

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Disc: 1

1. (We're Gonna) Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley And The Comets

2. Sixteen Candles - The Crests

3. Runaway - Del Shannon

4. Why Do Fools Fall In Love - Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers

5. That'll Be The Day - Buddy Holly

6. Fanny Mae - Buster Brown

7. At The Hop - Flash Cadillac & The Continental Kids

8. She's So Fine - Flash Cadillac & The Continental Kids

9. The Stroll - The Diamonds

10. See You In September - The Tempos

Disc: 2

1. Ain't That A Shame - Fats Domino

2. Johnny B. Goode - Chuck Berry

3. I Only Have Eyes For You - The Flamingos

4. Get A Job - The Silhouettes

5. To The Aisle - The Five Satins

6. Do You Wanna Dance - Bobby Freeman

7. Party Doll - Buddy Knox

8. Come Go With Me - The Del-Vikings

9. You're Sixteen-You're Beautiful (And You're Mine) - Johnny Burnette

10. Love Potion No. 9 - The Clovers

Where Were You In '62?

This 1973 release is almost a direct counterpoint to my previous nomination of Easy Rider. In 1973 America was mired in the backwash of the the Vietnam War, Watergate, the Cival Rights movement, and the rest of the upheaval the 60's and early 70's brought about. We needed something to just make us happy! This film, soundtrack, and the eventual television series that it inspired did just that. George Lucas selected each song personally, and the songs drove the film. Set in the early 60's, each song is heard from the perspective of coming out of your car radio, which was dialed into the local AM station, and each one introduced by legendary Disc Jockey Wolfman Jack (Can you dig it, Baby?).

I love all the old songs on this album, they are just happy, nostalgic songs! The obvious highlight is Bill Haley's (We're Gonna)Rock Around The Clock . That was the entire premise of the film, a late summer evening, teenagers cruising the streets till dawn, with the scary and wonderous prospects of their future stretched before them. Rock Around The Clock returned to American Billboard charts 20 years after its release based on the popularity it maintained after the release of this film!

If you are under the age of 30, and have never heard these songs from the perspective of a teenagers life in the 60's, you need to see this film, and hear these songs. This is Rock n Roll, and these are the roots that fostered the music of today!

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^ umm, Super Ry... would you mind to tell us to what MOVIE that album is the soundtrack of? :stars: :stars:

The album is based upon the Soundtrack for the French film "La Valee". It's a viable nomination, although I admit to not knowing it. See here:

wiki

Edited by Guest
i'm an idjit...

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"Obscured by Clouds" is the soundtrack for "La Vallée", Barbet Schroeder. I didn´t like the movie and didn´t like the album very much either...

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pip.jpg

[biggest]PRETTY IN PINK[/biggest]

1. If You Leave - Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark

2. Left of Center - Suzanne Vega w/ Joe Jackson

3. Get To Know Ya - Jesse Johnson

4. Do Wot You Do - INXS

5. Pretty in Pink - Psychedelic Furs

6. Shell Shock - New Order

7. Round, Round - Belouis Some

8. Wouldn't It Be Good - Danny Hutton Hitters

9. Bring on the Dancing Horses - Echo & the Bunnymen

10. Please Please Please Let me Get What I Want - The Smiths

Mere words cannot describe how much I loved this movie and this soundtrack, but I'll try. The basic premise of the movie is poor girl loves rich boy. Here are further details, if you are interested. And really, why wouldn't you be interested?

Anyhoo, the soundtrack is the perfect compliment to the longing and angst of the movie. "Left of Center" by Suzanne Vega featuring Joe Jackson sums up the whole movie for me. The lyrics are haunting and describe the teenage feeling of not quite fitting in perfectly.

I think that somehow

Somewhere inside of us

We must be similar

If not the same

So I continue

To be wanting you

Left of center

Against the grain

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[biggest]Empire Records[/biggest]

1. Til I Hear it From You - Gin Blossoms

2. Liar - The Cranberries

3. A Girl Like You - Edwyn Collins

4. Free - The Martinis

5. Crazy Life - Toad The Wet Sprocket

6. Bright as Yellow - The Innocence Mission

7. Circle Of Friends - Better Than Ezra

8. I Don't Want to Live Today - Ape Hangers

9. Whole Lotta Trouble - Cracker

10. Ready, Steady, Go - The Meices

11. What You Are - Drill

12. Nice Overalls - Lustre

13. Here It Comes Again - Please

14. The Ballad Of El' Goodo - Evan Dando

15. Sugarhigh - Coyote Shivers

One of the greatest teen movies of the 90s with the requisite fantastic soundtrack to match. The film is a day in the life of record store employees. Again, here is more info on the movie.

The soundtrack totally captures the 90s music scene. The version of "Sugarhigh" in the movie is not the same as on the soundtrack, but I prefer the movie version. Rene Zellwegger was a great addition to the song. The song that stands out for me the most is "Girl Like You" by Edwyn Collins. Sure, it's been in every movie ever made, but I can't think of the movie without thinking of the song and vice versa.

Above review is dedicated to my ravishing Radhi. Please see this movie...it is so you.

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