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Rate the Last Movie You've Seen


Farin
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I watched 12 Angry Men in my business negotiations class tonight, because it relates directly with negotiating. The movie has an interesting plot though a bit predictable that still stands 55 years later. I did get a bit tired of watching the cast (jury) in the same room during the whole duration, but it kept my interest the whole time. According to the IMDB members, this is the greatest black & white movie ever made.

9/10

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"Game Change" with Julianne Moore, Ed Harris, Woody Harrelson.

10/10

It was on HBO, and if you get a chance to catch it, make it a point to. Well worth the watch for the performances alone.

Whether you liked the McCain/Palin campaign pairing or didn't, Julianne Moore is mesmerizing as Sarah Palin. She captures her so dead-on I swore it was the real thing.

And I don't know how factual it was, but holy moses and jesus on toast if if was even toeing the line, that was a more scary time in American history than I ever imagined.

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I watched 12 Angry Men in my business negotiations class tonight, because it relates directly with negotiating. The movie has an interesting plot though a bit predictable that still stands 55 years later. I did get a bit tired of watching the cast (jury) in the same room during the whole duration, but it kept my interest the whole time. According to the IMDB members, this is the greatest black & white movie ever made.

9/10

:bow: I agree with the IMDB members.

Interesting that you, as a member of the sort of techie generation (aka anybody younger than me, heehee) found one of the very things that makes the film great, tedious. I mean the acting and the story, the interplay between the actors, and between their characters, and the plot itself. One of the great things about the film obviously, is that it doesn't need any more action to drive it than what it has - 12 angry men in one room reacting to the situation and one another.

Modern films of today are driven much more by the action, and the visuals, where the old black & whites were driven by the story, and interplay between the actors. Nothing wrong with this, it is what it is, but it point up the differences in how generations see things. Interesting. ;)

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Drive: 9.5/10

Immediately after seeing this film, I thought to myself, damn, this movie was all style and no substance, but the style was so good that it doesn't even matter, and it's actually a better movie for having no substance. But then I thought about it for a while and realized that there is actually a lot of substance to the movie, it's just not shoved in your face like you would expect an arthouse action flick to be. Much like another favorite of mine, No Country for Old Men, it is intentionally minimal in terms of character development and plot, which not only allows the audience to draw their own conclusions but also make commentary on emptiness and Hollywood. I dunno, sometimes I think I'm a little too quick to assume a movie is about movies in general, but I think I'm on the mark with this one. Anyway, I thought it was fantastic. Probably the "Taxi Driver" of our generation. Or at least the "No Country for Old Men" of Los Angeles. Or a less silly "Inglorious Basterds." Or maybe just a big cool aesthetic visual and aural feast, which I'd be ok with too. Also, I'm gonna be pretentious and create a new genre name for it: Post-superhero.

Took off a half point because the gore really did get to me. I think out of the action scenes, the most effective ones had the least gore. I'm fine with violence, but let's be real, blood is gross.

Haha. I KNEW someone else has seen this movie... and your assessment of it is not surprising. I think the only reason I have not seen it is because prettyboy Ryan Gossling is in it, but, then, the casting is a big part of a movie which relies heavily on visuals and sounds (the way a movie should really be made). I'm gonna buy the video and watch it on a triple-feature with The Driver and Vanishing Point. Oh, and as far as the genre this movie fits into, it's the Existential Road Movie subgenre that came into fame in the 70s (see Two-Lane Blacktop and Electra Glide In Blue). Drive fits into this sub-subcategory of films :beatnik:

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Saw Once on Netflix last night. A real diversion from the slick "not really slick, but gritty" movies from Hollywood, or the tried-to-trick-you-by-turning-a-theme-on-its-ear non-Hollywoodies; all of which seem to try so terribly hard to achieve the authentic feel that Once achieves so very easily. Once is truly a low budget movie (180,000 pounds - shot in 17 days) about sincerely talented street musicians who say, "Once I get myself (or some other situation) together, I am going to take a shot in earnest at musical statement on a larger stage," and about those musicians who never quite seem to fulfill their dreamy quest.

The two unknown "stars" of the movie (their characters' roles are listed in the credits only as "Guy" and "Girl") are actual musicians, which adds so much to the feel of authenticity. It is almost as if we are watching a very high-tech home movie.

The guy, played by Glen Hansard, who won the 2006 Oscar for best original song for this movie, is a Dublin wannabe street busker, who writes and sings simply because he is compelled to do so by some inner angst that will not be satisfied. To me, he several times looked like a young "Dr. House" with the same intensity for singing in his Cat Stevens-ish voice as House has for solving baffling diseases. He meets an estranged Czech expatriate who not only appreciates his music, but combines her own musical gifts with his, in order to help him get his shot at London and perhaps some notoriety.

This movie is not formulaic in any way, however, so although the viewer is drawn into a week in the lives of the subjects, the ending may not be how you think it should be. Therein, it is actually very much like life. I think that is why I enjoyed it so much.

Once - 8/10

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I just watched "127 Hours" based on Aron Ralston's book about being trapped in a canyon in Utah for almost a week. OMG.....well done film and even though you already know going in that he survives and how he survives, it's still suspenseful. 7/10.

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We watched Wild Target the other night and it was alright mostly because Bill Nighy is normally good and it has Harry Potter's Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint) playing a different role. The woman in it drove me half mad though mostly because I cannot stand people like her - freeloading hedonists. 5/10

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Saw "21 Jump Street" yesterday and laughed all the way through it... it was really funny. :grin:

The Johnny Depp cameo at the end was a surprise, and it probably should have been a little shorter. They played it for more than it was worth.

I don't even know who Channing Tatum is (or is it Tatum Channing?) but he was really funny.

And Holly Robinson Peete from the TV series popped up, too. They kept her cameo at a good length.

Anyway, I'll give it 9.5 out of 10, just because the JD cameo went too far. Good way to spend a couple of hours. Left me in a good mood and smiling. :)

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Saw "The Perfect Host" the other day. Very odd but very interesting movie. David Hyde Pierce stars as a very eccentric man who's house happens to be the one a fugitive on the lam runs into. Then things get weird...

It's a good movie though. David Hyde Pierce does incredibly well too.

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