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Random Lists of Random Things


PSYCHOcatholic

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How to Keep a healthy level of Insanity and Drive other People Insane:

1) At lunch time, sit in your parked car and point a hairdryer at passing cars to see if they slow down.

2) Page yourself over the intercom. (Don't disguise your voice.)

3) Insist that your e-mail address is xena-goddess-of-fire@companyname.com or Elvis-the-King@companyname.com.

4) Everytime someone asks you to do something, ask if they want fries with that.

5) Encourage your co-workers to join in a little synchronized chair-dancing.

6) Put your garbage can on your desk and label it 'IN'

7) Develop an unnatural fear of staplers.

8) Put decaf in the coffee maker for 3 weeks straight. Once everyone has gotten over their caffine addictions, switch to espresso.

9) dont use any punctuation

10) As often as possible, skip rather than walk.

11) Specify that your drive-through order is "TO GO."

12) Sing along at the Opera ( and if you don't know the words, even better: make something up.)

13) Find out where your boss shops and buy exactly the same outfits. Wear them one day after your boss does. ( This is especially effective if your boss is the opposite gender)

14) Send e-mails to the rest of the company to tell them what you are doing. For example: If anyone needs me, I'll be in the bathroom.

15) Five days in advance, tell your friends you can't make their party, because you're not in the mood.

16) Call the psyhic hotline and just say "Guess who!"

17) When the money comes out of the ATM, scream: "I won! I won!" for the third time this week!!!

18) Tell your boss, "It's not the voices in my head that bothers me, it's the voices in your head that do."

---Go forth and reek havic on the sane world and make them as insane as you, or at least as insane as people believe you to be!---

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[big]20 More Things That Are Not What They Seem[/big]

[smaller]Link[/smaller]

1. The Hundred Years’ War did not last for 100 years but 116. It was actually a series of separate campaigns and battles which continued for 116 years (from 1337 to 1453).

2. The Blitz was not a blitzkrieg, it was an example of strategic bombing. A blitzkrieg is “a headline word applied retrospectively to describe a military doctrine of an all-mechanized force concentrating its attack on a small section of the enemy front then, once the latter is broken, proceeding without regard to its flank.â€

3. In golf, the clubs commonly referred to as “woods†are usually made of metal. The club heads for “woods†were formerly made predominantly of wood.

4. An egg cream is really chocolate flavored syrup with seltzer and milk. It typically contains neither eggs nor cream. [Pictured above]

5. Head cheese is actually a meat product.

6. Anti-semitism usually refers to hatred of jews. But the fact is, semites refers not just to jews, but to all semitic peoples which includes Arabs. The proper term for what is normally regarded as anti-semitism would be anti-jewish.

7. An inchworm is neither an inch long, nor a worm.

8. Tear gas is not a gas, but a (solid) crystalline substance.

9. The East River is not a river, but a tidal strait.

10. The titmouse is a bird, not a mouse. [Pictured above]

11. Despite its name, the Jerusalem artichoke has no relation to Jerusalem, and little to do with artichokes. Jerusalem derives from Girasole, the Italian word for sunflower, by folk etymology. The taste of the tuber of a Jerusalem artichoke merely resembles the taste of the leaves of the Globe Artichoke.

12. Arabic numerals originated in India, though they came to be associated with the Arab world.

13. Panama hats are made in Ecuador, but are associated with Panama as they were widely worn during construction of the Panama Canal.

14. French fries did not originate in France. There are some doubts about their origin, but they most likely were invented in Belgium. They’re called “French†because vegetables sliced in that manner are called “juliennedâ€, which sounds French. [Pictured above]

15. Mongolian barbecue is neither Mongolian in origin nor barbecue. It has its origins in Taiwan and actually derives from Japanese-style teppanyaki which was popular there at the time.

16. White chocolate is not actually considered chocolate by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States and other bodies, even though it contains cocoa butter.

17. The term “tidal wave†is often applied to tsunamis, even though they are not caused by tides.

18. Sugar soap contains neither sugar nor soap.

19. An egg roll is an appetizer usually made by wrapping a combination of chopped vegetables, not eggs.

20. Chinese checkers did not originate in China (or even Asia). It was invented in Germany in 1893 under the name “Stern-Halmaâ€, as a variation on the older American game of Halma.

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2. The Blitz was not a blitzkrieg, it was an example of strategic bombing. A blitzkrieg is “a headline word applied retrospectively to describe a military doctrine of an all-mechanized force concentrating its attack on a small section of the enemy front then, once the latter is broken, proceeding without regard to its flank.â€

Try telling that to Buddy Ryan.

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5. Head cheese is actually a meat product.

gross.

10. The titmouse is a bird, not a mouse.

...and the other part? :beatnik:

14. French fries did not originate in France.

what about french toast? and the kissing thing?

19. An egg roll is an appetizer usually made by wrapping a combination of chopped vegetables, not eggs.

I've always wondered why in the hell they're called "egg" rolls. :crazy:

and what the heck is "sugar soap"?

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I've always wondered why in the hell they're called "egg" rolls. :crazy:

and what the heck is "sugar soap"?

1. They're called egg rolls because of a few reasons; one, they have an egg-based crust and two, it's dipped in an egg wash before frying.

2. Sugar soap is primarily made of sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate and sodium silicate and its powdery appearance makes it look like table sugar. It's more common in Commonwealth countries.

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what about french toast? and the kissing thing?

don't know about the kissing, but the toast could be coming from

According to the International House of Pancakes, French toast is not necessarily French in origin; it is likely that the recipe dates back to medieval times and may have been a logical “invention†by different peoples, akin to battering and frying any food.[citation needed] Supposedly it was originally known in England and America as "German toast", prior to the First World War, when it was changed because of anti-German sentiment.[4]

I thought the last fact was a bit strange, because this food's MUCH more common in the US than in Germany.

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