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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts

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Thanks lovely ladies :thumbsup:

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #150

TWO songs missing from the Songfacts database this week:

Eve - The Heavy Sandwich (2008)

Waterfall - The Stone Roses (1989)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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Waterfall - Stone Roses

The track which follows "Waterfall" on the album, "Don't Stop," consists of Ian Brown singing new lyrics over the backwards instrumental track of "Waterfall."

The song was sampled by DJ Sam Flanigan for a mashup with LDN by Lily Allen

The song was used in the film Green Street which starred Elijah Wood. The song is played when Matt (Wood) is getting aquianted with his brother in law Pater (Charlie Hunnam) and his friends. And the film There's Only One Jimmy Grimble which starred Robert Carlyle

"Waterfall" is used as the theme song on the opening and closing credits of the Irish topical

comedy TV programme The Panel.

[smaller]Note: These facts are plagiarized and subject to fabrication from an uncredited source.[/smaller]

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"Waterfall"

The Stone Roses

Written by Ian Brown/Jon Squire

Single from their debut album, The Stone Roses.

Released on December 30, 1991.

It reached #27 in the UK charts.

Single by The Stone Roses

The song was sampled by DJ Sam Flanigan for a mashup with LDN by Lily Allen. It was part of the soundtrack of

the film Green Street which starred Elijah Wood and also the film There's Only One. It´s the theme song on the opening and closing credits of The Panel, an Irish TV show.

...and that´s all I could find.

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Okay, I can probably think of some things. :)

"Eve" - The Heavy Sandwich

-written by A. Peeples/J. Nipe/M. Thomasson/A. Scull

-So it's about a sort of mean girl in Florida.

-It has a round in it.

-We've played it in various different styles, but our favorite was with a latin drum beat, piano and violin.

-We've played it acoustically on the radio.

-On the album I borrowed a 12-string guitar, a Danelectro.

-I once took tracks from the album version and remixed them to use in a rap song by a friend of ours, and he's performed it live.

-Radhi will star in the video, once she agrees to the knife-throwing.

I'm sorry, that really isn't very interesting. Feel free to make things up if it helps. :)

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Thanks to all who contributed or commented this week :thumbsup:

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #151

Just the one song missing this week:

Long Tall Glasses - Leo Sayer (1974)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Long Tall Glasses (I Can Dance)"

Leo Sayer

Written by David Courtney/Leo Sayer.

Released in 1974 as a track of his 1974 LP "Just A Boy" (his second album)

Also released as a single in the UK in 1974. It reached #4 in the charts.

In the US the single was released in 1975 and it peaked at #9.

:help:

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #152

THREE songs needing facts!

Lies - The Knickerbockers (1965)

Flirtin' With Disaster - Molly Hatchet (1979)

Bad Time - Grand Funk Railroad (1974)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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Lies by The Knickerbockers, composed by Beau Charles/Buddy Randell.

"The Knickerbockers' "Lies" is justly regarded as the most accurate early- Beatles imitation. Even many years after its original release, there's still a good chance it can fool younger listeners who weren't around to hear it upon its original release in late 1965 into thinking they've stumbled across a Beatles song they somehow haven't heard before. The secret of its success — and actually it was pretty successful, making the Top 20 — was that almost all blatant Beatles imitations focused on the lighter, poppier side of the band. "Lies" hardly ignored Beatlesque pop hooks, but it also emulated the Beatles' toughest, hardest-rocking side. It sounded like it could have somehow fit into their A Hard Day's Night, Beatles for Sale, or Help! albums, yet was not explicitly derivative of any one Beatles song. Like several prominent Beatles songs, it's unusual in that it starts with a chorus, à la early- Beatles ravers like "Can't Buy Me Love," "When I Get Home," or "Anytime at All." The group's shouts of "Lies!" are immediately answered by a tough, almost gnarly brief angry guitar riff. The aggressive lead vocal is amazingly like that of John Lennon, and perhaps the single trait most responsible for convincing many that this was a Beatles record. After the title is sung, the melody craftily goes into a brief, far moodier section, returning to the chorus but almost immediately inserting an exhilarating minor-key, very Lennon-esque falsetto. In yet another Beatlesque turn, the brief verses (or bridges — the delineation isn't too clear) are in a decidedly more minor melodic mood than the relatively cheery chorus. That's particularly so when the vocals accuse the girl of being unfaithful in a fashion simultaneously threatening and hurt — another very Lennon-esque characteristic. The background vocals were very much like the sort that Paul McCartney and George Harrison sang on Lennon rockers like "You Can't Do That"; the scream in the instrumental break was very much like McCartney's whoops; and the slightly sloppy yet concise guitar solo in the break was rather in Harrison's style. For all the Beatles comparisons, though, "Lies" was a hugely enjoyable single for its own merits, even if the early Beatles styles they were aping had been discarded by the Beatles themselves when "Lies" peaked at number 20 in early 1966. "Lies" was covered, in a less overtly Beatlesque manner, by Lulu and, in France, by Ronnie Bird, in a translated-to-French version retitled 'Cheese.'"

from Allmusic.com - Richard Unterberger

Edited by Guest

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"Bad Time"

Grand Funk Railroad

Written by Mark Farmer.

Released in 1974 as a single -it reached #4 in the US- and as a track of their album "All the Girls in the World Beware!".

According allmusic.com,

...mixes a delicate, string-laden melody with a pulsing beat from the rhythm section to create a one-of-a-kind power ballad

:help:

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"Flirtin' With Disaster"

Molly Hatchet

Written by Danny Joe Brown/Dave Hlubek/Banner Thomas.

Released in March 1980 as a single -the only single from that album- and also as a track of their second album "Flirting With Disaster". It reached #42 in the Bilboard 100.

Wikipedia says:

...has appeared in the film The Dukes of Hazzard, and the video games NASCAR 98 and Rock Band.

It was their biggest hit.

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #153

Just ONE song:

Hardest Button To Button - The White Stripes (2003)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"The Hardest Button To Button"

The White Stripes

Written by Jack White and released in December 2003 as a single. It was recorded in April in the same year. It s also a track from their album "Elephant".

The song is about a

child trying to find his place in a dysfunctional family when a baby comes
(wiki).

There´s a famous video for this song.

The video utilizes pixilation animation to create the effect of dozens of drum kits and guitar amplifiers multiplying to the rhythm of the song as Jack and Meg perform. For example, in one sequence, Meg is seen playing the bass drum at a subway station. At every beat she plays, she appears with a new bass drum while the last becomes vacant. This was achieved by first setting up a trail of bass drums. Then, Meg would be filmed performing a single beat on the last drum in the line, followed by the removal of that drum. Meg would then proceed to the next drum, play another beat, and so on. The final video is edited to include the drum beats with the sequence reversed, making it appear as if the drums are being added to the beat, appearing out of thin air. As many as 80 identical bass drums and Fender guitar amps were used in the video.

Much of the video was filmed around Riverside Drive and the Columbia University area near Grant's Tomb and around the 125th Street exit and surrounding neighborhood, - all part of the Upper West Side in Manhattan - New York City. Parts of the video were filmed at the 33rd Street PATH station.

There is a short cameo by Beck about two and a half minutes in as a man in a white suit presenting Jack with a "box with something in it".

(wiki)

The cover of the single is an allusion to the graphics of Saul Bass, seen in the movie posters and title sequences of films such as Anatomy of a Murder and The Man with the Golden Arm.

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #154

TWO songs missing this week:

Lonely Days - Bee Gees (1970)

Mandolin Wind - Rod Stewart (1971)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Lonely Days"

The Bee Gees

Written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb. The single -with "A Man For All Seasons" as sideB- was released in 1970.

It reached #1 and #3 at the Hit-parades in the US -their first single to make the Top Five-

The song was also a track of their album 2 Years On.

The song was noted for its innovative structure and changing tempo, helping establish the band as proponents of the incipient singer/songwriter movement. In many interviews, the Bee Gees have said that they wrote this song and "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart?" in the same night that they reunited.
, says Wikipedia.

Allmusic:

After a short breakup period, Robin Gibb reunited with Barry Gibb and Maurice Gibb to restore the central three-brother unit of the Bee Gees. They entered the 1970s with the successful Two Years On album and scored one of their biggest pre- disco era hits with "Lonely Days." The lyrics to "Lonely Days" seem to be typical pop-song fodder, consisting of musings about "Mister Sunshine" and a chorus that intones "Lonely days, lonely nights/Where would I be without my woman?" However, the hook-laden melody makes it easy to see why this song became an international chart-topper. "Lonely Days" combines the group's knack for strong hooks with an unusual and surprising song structure that combines elements of balladry and up-tempo pop: the verse melodies have a slow, somber ballad tempo that unexpectedly shift to a bright, major-key style for the sunny mid-tempo chorus. The Bee Gees' recording plays this unusual dichotomy up with a clever arrangement that utilizes ballad-style orchestration and piano on the verses then replaces those elements with a handclap-laden beat and swinging horns on the choruses. The resulting fusion of ballad sweetness and pop hooks topped the charts in the U.S. and allowed the Bee Gees to reestablish themselves as proponents of the singer/songwriter genre, a stylistic turn that would soon yield more hits like "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart" and "Run to Me."

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Mandolin Wind is the 7th track from the album Every Picture Tells a Story. The third album released by Rod Stewart. It was released in the middle of 1971. Every Picture Tells a Story became Stewart's most critically acclaimed album.

Song Review by Stewart Mason

"Maggie May" has all the rock radio glory, but "Mandolin Wind" is every bit its equal, as effective a mixture of British folk and American rock (or, for that matter, American folk and British rock) as Fairport Convention's best work from the same period. Although the song never rises beyond a midtempo stroll, even during the comparatively rocking fadeout, it's nevertheless a masterpiece of dynamics. Almost entirely acoustic, the arrangement adds and subtracts instruments in waves, culminating in the thrilling wash of Martin Quittenton's mandolins in the final instrumental break. Over this, Stewart sings quite possibly the most emotionally direct lyrics of his career; sung from the point of view of an aging rural husband, it's a simple, sweet declaration of love and fidelity that's about a hundred times more believable than later efforts like "You're in My Heart."

From All Music.

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