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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts

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Listen To Her Heart:

Original Release Date: April 30, 1978

Wiki

"Listen to Her Heart" is the second single from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers' second album, You're Gonna Get It!. It peaked at #59 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1978.

Sorry thats all I can find :crazy:

:help:

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Listen To Her Heart:

Original Release Date: April 30, 1978

Wiki

"Listen to Her Heart" is the second single from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers' second album, You're Gonna Get It!. It peaked at #59 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1978.

Sorry thats all I can find :crazy:

:help:

Lea, I found a review in allmusic :)

Those chiming guitars and Tom Petty's own doubled vocals are what send "Listen to Her Heart" off and running. It's a great, simple story that without providing too much specific imagery is incredibly evocative: A man is trying to take another man's woman but the singer is certain that his "girl" will be back; "she's gonna listen to her heart." Petty has said he wrote the song after his wife went to Ike Turner's house and "got locked in." The lyric "you think you're gonna take her away with your money and your cocaine" may have raised a few eyebrows at the time, but years later it certainly signals the era in which the song was cut — circa the late '70s. There's that big bass and drums sound but the keyboards are barely audible ( Petty's early work has been roundly criticized for poor production quality). Nevertheless, a great song is a great song and with its tidiness (simple guitar, bass, and drums tracks), timeless theme, and neat, old-fashioned finish, "Listen to Her Heart" remains a song from the early years that wears well, especially when the Heartbreakers haul it out for a live go-around.

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"Wasted On The Way"

Crosby, Stills & Nash

Written by Graham Nash. Recorded in November 1980 and January 1981. Originally released on Daylight Again, June 21, 1982.

Wikipedia said:

1982 hit single by US-based Crosby, Stills & Nash. It was their first major hit in roughly five years, and went to #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles charts in August of 1982. It appeared on the band's 1982 album Daylight Again.

.

Allmusic:

This undemanding Graham Nash pop tune hails from the Crosby, Stills & Nash (CS&N) “reunion†LP Daylight Again (1982). Unfortunately the reality is that the vast majority of the project — which had initially only involved Nash and Stephen Stills — was recorded in absentia of a substance-riddled David Crosby. Although the tune and instrumentation appear somewhat simplistic, the lyrics reflect Nash’s observations and concerns about growing old and wasting the finite time that people have with each other on this plane. In later years, he confessed to having also been inspired by the downward spiral of Crosby — his best friend and band mate — during the late ’70 and early ’80s.

The studio version, although somewhat emotionally staid, contains a lilting solo from session fiddle player Wayne Goodwin. Perhaps a more telling sign of the times is that Eagles vocalist Timothy B. Schmit was called in to contribute vocally. Likewise, apart from Stills acoustic guitar, none of the other principle band members are featured instrumentally on “Wasted On The Wayâ€. While credited with vocals, Crosby is arguably nowhere to be heard on this cut.

In performance, CS&N gave the song a much more affective acoustic arrangement. This revealed the trio’s inimitable vocal blend — which, on a good night, could sound ageless. It was issued as the a-side of the first single from Daylight Again b/w “Delta†— and landed in the Top Ten during the first week of July 1982. The Allies (1983) compilation contains a live recording of the song — which was lifted from the band’s Daylight Again (1982) concert. Likewise, when Nash reunited with the Hollies in 1983 for an album and tour, they backed him on vocals during his live mini acoustic set. This unusual version can be heard on the Hollies edition of the Archive Alive! (1997) series.

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #125

ONE song missing from Songfacts this week:

Share The Land - The Guess Who (1970)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Share The Land"

The Gess Who

Written by Burton Cummings.

Released as a track of "Share The Land" (album) in 1970.

It was also released as a single and it reached#2 in the Canadian charts and #10 in the US charts.

:help:

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Thankyou edna :bow:

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #126

THREE songs are not already part of the Songfacts database this week. Those songs are:

Dirty Work - Steely Dan (1972)

Apeman - The Kinks (1970)

Roses - OutKast (2003)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Apeman"

The Kinks

Written by Ray Davies and released as a track of their 1970 album "Lola vs Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One"

The single was released in November, 20th with "Rats" as the B-side. It was the next single after "Lola" and it charted at #5 in the UK charts.

According wikipedia,

Davies is fed up with the modern world and declares that he wants to, "sail away to a distant shore and make like an apeman." He also expresses how man created our problems and, given half a chance, he would leave the cities and traffic to live in the jungle. In some ways, this is the epitome of the nostalgia expressed on the albums Lola vs. Powerman and The Village Green Preservation Society.

The Kinks caused some controversy, because in the line "...the air pollution is fogging up my eyes...", the word "fogging" sounds much like "f*cking".

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"Dirty Work"

Steely Dan

Written by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen.

Relased as a track of their debut album "Can´t Buy A Thrill", in 1972.

Allmusic said: The odd song out in Steely Dan's career, "Dirty Work" is an uncharacteristically emotional depiction of marital infidelity, interestingly observed from the point of view of the man doing the cuckolding. With its soulful clavinet and tenor sax opening and upward-modulating chorus, "Dirty Work" is by some measure the most commercial-sounding song on Can't Buy a Thrill... Because it was original lead singer David Palmer's showcase, "Dirty Work" was retired from Steely Dan's repertoire after Palmer left the band in 1973, and was largely forgotten by most due to its dissimilarity to the sardonic jazz-rock that came later. The song did enjoy a revival in 2001 due to its use in a powerful scene in the third-season premiere of The Sopranos.

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #127

FOUR songs missing this week:

She's A Lady - Tom Jones (1971)

Ride - The Vines (2004)

Sign Of The Gypsy Queen - April Wine (1981)

Because - Dave Clark Five (1964)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"She´s A Lady"

Tom Jones

Written by Paul Anka.

Released in 1971. It was performed by Tom Jones and reached #2 in the Billboard chart.

I´ll come back with more... ;)

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"She´s A Lady"

Tom Jones

Written by Paul Anka.

Released in 1971. It was performed by Tom Jones and reached #2 in the Billboard chart.

I´ll come back with more... ;)

The song was inducted into Canada’s songwriters Hall of Fame on May 12th, 2008

:help:

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"Because"

Dave Clark Five

Written by Mike Smith and Dave Clark. Released as a single in 1966, it reached #3 in the UK Charts.

Allmusic said:

The common classification of the Dave Clark Five as an enjoyable group who were not nearly as sophisticated as their (briefly) main competitors the Beatles is to a large degree correct. On their 1964 number three hit single "Because," though, Dave Clark crafted a song that was on about the same melodic level as all but the best of the early Beatles' compositions. They never duplicated that feat again, but to do it even once was commendable enough. Unlike most of the Dave Clark Five's hits, "Because" was not a reverb-coated storm of hoofbeat drums, sax, organ, and raunchy Mike Smith vocal, but a sweet, clear rockaballad, with no saxophone in sight. It's the organ that carries the instrumental arrangement at the start, with a ticklish five-note riff as the tune changes keys dramatically, much in the manner of the early John Lennon- Paul McCartney original "I'll Be on the Way" (covered by Billy J. Kramer, though the Beatles only did it on the BBC). Harmony vocals, rather than Smith's firepower, dominate the verses, with their beautiful, unusual, and irresistible chord changes and tender, romantic lyrics. Smith's vocals get a little more urgent on the brief bridge, which nonetheless is also built around constantly shifting keys and major-minor chord blends. The organ solo in the middle gets just a little twee and cutesy, but is redeemed by an unexpected eerie descent at the end that doesn't appear anywhere else in the song. Like many British Invasion rockers, the Dave Clark Five mastered the art of extending syllables to convey a meaning to words that would have seemed trite on paper, particularly when they dragged out "I" in the "because I love you" words that end the verses. The lower parts of the organ on this track have an amazingly foggy, vibrant timbre that proves Dave Clark could produce more than the usual DC5 formula sounds when he put his mind to it. "Because," incidentally, was only a B-side (to "Can't You See That She's Mine") in Britain. Clark insisted that the song come out as an A-side in America, over some resistance from Epic Records, and proved that the band had a more subtle dimension than was evident from the stomping hits that were their main diet.

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"Sign of the Gipsy Queen"

April Wine

Written by Lorence Hud .

Released in their 1981 album "The Nature of the Beast".

It reached #40 in the Canadian charts and # 57 in the American charts.

"The Nature of the Beast" remains one of the groups all time fan favorites, with many of the individual songs being released on subsequent compilations. (according their official site).

"The Sign O The Gipsy Queen" has been released in:

The Nature of The Beast (studio album)

1994 - Harley Davidson Road Songs

1994 - Harley Davidson Road Songs (Edited Version)

1994 - Wine Collection

1998 - The Hits

1999 - King Biscuit Flower Hour

2002 - Classic Masters

2003 - From the Front Row Live

2003 - Greatest Hits Live

2004 - I Like To Rock

:help: :help:

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"Ride"

The Vines

Written by Craig Nicholls

Released Released March 8, 2004

Recorded in 2003

According wiki:

The first single from The Vines' 2nd album Winning Days. It is one of the bands most well known songs although it wasn't that commercially successful because "Ride" was featured in a number of advertisements, including in commercials for Apple's iPod, Nissan and American Chopper and NASCAR Hot Pass. The "Ride" music video, directed by Michel and Oliver Gondry, sees the band playing by themselves in a hall. When they get to the chorus, bands appear from everywhere, helping them sing and play.

This song is included in some 18 cds...

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #129

Apoligies for the lateness...

Only the one song missing from Songfacts this week;

Sweet Talkin' Woman - Electric Light Orchestra (1978)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Sweet Talking Woman"

ELO

Written by Jeff Lynne.

Wikipedia:

Recorded in 1977. Released as a track of their album"Out Of The Blue" and as a single in 1978 with "Blue Bird Is Dead" as the B-side ("Fire On High" was the B-side in the US)

Sweet Talkin' Woman" is a 1978 single by The Electric Light Orchestra from the LP Out of the Blue. Its original title was "Dead End Street," but changed during recording, perhaps to avoid confusion with a 1966 hit of the same title by the Kinks.

The track became the third Top Ten hit from the LP in the UK, peaking at No. 6. As a novelty, initial copies of the 12" and 7" formats were pressed in transparent purple vinyl.

The version released in the United States was 10 seconds shorter than its British counterpart due to a slightly faster mix. In the U.S., it reached #17 on the Billboard chart in the spring of 1978.

The song has been covered by the Christian ska band Five Iron Frenzy on their Quantity Is Job 1 EP.

There´s a web page about this song: http://www.jefflynnesongs.com/sweettalkinwoman/

The opening of the song is quite reminiscent of the Miss Marple theme music.

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #130

FOUR songs missing this week:

Little Bit O' Soul - The Music Explosion (1967)

I Will Remember You - Sarah McLachlan (1995)

Rush - Big Audio Dynamite (1991)

I'm So Afraid - Fleetwood Mac (1975)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Little Bit Of Soul"

The Music Explosion

from wikipedia:

The Music Explosion was a garage rock band from Mansfield, Ohio best known for their top Ten hit, "Little Bit O'Soul", in 1967. The single peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. They were discovered and signed by the producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz.

Kasenetz, Katz and Elliot Chiprut produced the song "Little Bit O'Soul", which paved the way for bubblegum pop bands like Ohio Express and 1910 Fruitgum Company. The song was a million seller (Laurie Records #3380, subsequently reissued on Buddah Records) but was the band's only hit. It was written by John Carter and Ken Lewis, who went on to write big hits for The Ivy League and Herman's Hermits.

Lead singer Jamie Lyons also recorded several solo singles on Laurie while still recording with the group. His first single, "Soul Struttin'" became a Northern Soul hit in several Northeast regions. Lyons died of heart failure at his home in Little River, SC on September 25, 2006. He was 57.

"Little Bit O'Soul" has been subsequently covered by several bands including The Ramones,Dodging Susan, and 2 Live Crew, who sampled the melody.

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"I'm So Afraid"

Fleetwood Mac

Written by Lindsay Buckingham. Recorded in February 1975. Released as a track of their second album "Fleetwood Mac" in July 1975.

:help:

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"Rush"

Big Audio Dynamite

Wikipedia again:

"Rush" is a song by Big Audio Dynamite II from their album The Globe. It was a number 1 hit on Modern Rock Tracks chart for 4 weeks.

In the UK, "Rush" was released as the B-side to the 1991 re-release of "Should I Stay or Should I Go". The A-side was immensely popular due to its inclsuion in a Levi Strauss & Co. advert. The single reached number 1 on the UK Singles Chart. The sleeve art for the 7" single displayed the Clash on the front, and BAD II on the rear. The record label displays "Should I Stay or Should I Go" as side 'A', and "Rush" as side 'AA'. The release was effectively a 'Double A-side' release.

The "New York City Club Version" remix of "Rush" was featured in the 1993 Mike Myers' film So I Married an Axe Murderer.

The song samples several other songs including the keyboard component of The Who's song "Baba O'Riley", the opening samples the opening of the Deep Purple song "Child in Time" and a line from the The Sugar Hill Gang's song Rapper's Delight where Big Bank Hank raps 'a time to laugh and a time to cry'.

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I Will Remember You

Sarah McLachlan

Written by Sarah McLachlan, Seamus Egan and Dave Merenda.

Wiki says:

The song first appeared on the soundtrack to the movie The Brothers McMullen in 1995, and was featured on her remix album Rarities, B-Sides and Other Stuff. It became a hit when McLachlan released a live version of the song from her 1999 album Mirrorball placing at #14 in the US.

The song also earned McLachlan a Grammy Award in 1999.

* It was featured as the opening song in the final episode of Melrose Place, "Asses to Ashes"

* It was featured in two episodes of Felicity, "Felicity Was Here" and the series finale "Felicity, Interrupted: Back to the Future".

* It was featured in an episode of Dawson's Creek during the fourth season episode "You Had Me At Goodbye."

* It was featured in The Simpsons episode "Dial 'N' for Nerder", during the tribute to Martin Prince.

* It was featured in CSI: Crime Scene Investigation episode "Goodbye and Good Luck" for Jorja Fox's last episode.

* It was featured in 30 Rock episode "Sandwich Day" with Jonathan singing the song as he said goodbye to Jack Doneghy.

* It was featured in the movie Anywhere but Here with a choir singing the song at a funeral.

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Thankyou always, Queen of Facts, edna! :bow:

Apoligies for my lateness; on to...

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #131

HALF of this week's ten is not currently on Songfacts!

December - Collective Soul (1995)

Coming Into Los Angeles - Arlo Guthrie (1969)

I Feel The Earth Move - Carole King (1971)

No Time - The Guess Who (1970)

Ain't That A Bitch - Johnny "Guitar" Watson (1976)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Coming Into Los Angeles"

Arlo Guthrie

Written by Arlo Guthrie. Released as a track of his third album "Running Down The Road" in 1969.

The song is well-known as one of the top performances at the Woodstock Festival.

Very hippy lyrics... "bringing in a couple of keys (kilos of weed)... don´t touch my bags if you please, Mr. Customs man..."

It was a minor hit though it´s a very popular and catchy song.

Lyrics:

Coming in from London

From over the pole

Flying in a big airliner

Chickens flying everywhere around the plane

Could we ever feel much finer?

Coming into Los Angeles

Bringing in a couple of keys

Don't touch my bags if you please

Mister Customs Man

There's a guy with a ticket to Mexico

No, he couldn't look much stranger

Walking in the hall with his things and all

Smiling, said he was the Lone Ranger

Hip woman walking on a moving floor

Tripping on the escalator

There's a man in the line

And she's blowing his mind

Thinking that he's already made her

Coming in from London

From over the pole

Flying in a big airliner

Chickens flying everywhere around the plane

Could we ever feel much finer?

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"I Feel The Earth Move"

Carole King

Written by Carole KIng. Released in April 1971 as the B-side of another hit, "It´s Too Late" but also released as a two A-sides singles. Both songs belong to her album "Tapestry".

It was also her first single.

It was in the Bilboard Hot 100 Charts for five weeks, along with "It´s Too Late".

From Wikipedia:

A showcase for King's upbeat piano style, "I Feel the Earth Move" has lyrics with the same percussive feel:

I feel the earth - move - under my feet

I feel the sky tum-b-ling down - tum-b-ling down

I feel my heart start to trem-b-ling -

Whenever you're around

Jon Landau's review of Tapestry for Rolling Stone praised King's voice on this track, saying it negotiates turns from "raunchy" to "bluesy" to "harsh" to "soothing", with the last echoing the development of the song's melody into its chorus.

Given its upbeat nature, Ode Records selected "I Feel the Earth Move" as the A-side to Tapestry's first single. It achieved airplay, but then disc jockeys and listeners began to prefer the slower, lamenting B-side "It's Too Late". Both sides received airplay for a while, but eventually "It's Too Late" dominated. In fact, on the concurrent Cash Box singles chart, which still tracked the progress of both sides of a single separately, "It's Too Late " spent four weeks at number one while "I Feel the Earth Move" did not chart at all. Regardless, since Billboard had declared the record a double A-side and their chart gradually became seen by many as the "official" singles chart, it is generally listed as such in books and articles.

Together with "It's Too Late", "I Feel the Earth Move" was named by the RIAA as number 213 of 365 Songs of the Century.

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