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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts


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"Disco 2000" is a hit single by British band Pulp. It is the third one from their album Different Class, following #2 hits "Common People" and the double A-side "Mis-Shapes"/"Sorted for E's & Wizz".

The song tells the story of a narrator falling for a childhood friend, called 'Deborah', who subsquently gave birth to a veggie who likes to throw labradours off balconys around the Fenham area in Newcastle. Apparently, Deborah was more popular than him and he was wondering what it would be like to meet again in the year 2000, rendering it thematically consistent with the album title, "Different Class". It is believed that the fountain referred to as the meeting place was Goodwin Fountain, located on Fargate, in Sheffield city centre. This song peaked in the UK at #7.

The song was covered by Nick Cave as a b-side for the single 'Bad Cover Version'.

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"I´m Losing You"

Rod Stewart and The Faces

(Whitfield/Holland/Grant)

"(I Know) I´m Losing You" was originally released as a single in 1966, performed by The Temptations and reached on the Billboard R&B singles chart and #8 eight on the Billboard Pop Singles chart.

Rare Earth also had a hit with it (and also for Motown Records)in 1970.

Rod Stewart recoorded this song for his 1971 album "Every Picture Tells a Story" and was also released as a single.

Wikipedia says:

All five members of The Faces (with whom Stewart at that time was lead vocalist) appeared on the album, with guitarist/bassist Ronnie Wood and keyboardist Ian McLagan on B3 organ being most prominent. Due to contractual restrictions, the personnel listings were somewhat vague, and it was unclear that the full Faces line-up recorded the version of the Motown hit "(I Know) I'm Losing You".

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #117

Two songs without facts this week:

Up Around The Bend - Creedence Clearwater Revival (1970)

I Try - Macy Gray (1999)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Up Around The Bend"

Creedence Clearwater Revival

Written by John Fogerty and released as a track of their 1970 album Cosmo´s Factory. It was the B-side of the single released in April with "Run Through the Jungle" as A-side.

According Wikipedia:

The song is opened with a prominent, high-pitched guitar riff played by John Fogerty. The song's lyrics have Fogerty telling of a big happening, perhaps a party or festival, that's right "around the bend" on the highway and urging the listener to join him.

Released as a single, along with "Run Through the Jungle" on the flipside, the double sided single (counted as one entry by the methodology used by Billboard Magazine at the time) eventually climbed to number four on the Billboard chart in the spring of 1970 and eventually was certified gold by the RIAA, for sales of over one million copies. It was also a major hit in the UK , reaching number three on their pop singles chart.

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I Try - Macy Gray (1999)

From Wiki.

"I Try" is the second single from Macy Gray's debut album On How Life Is, released in 1999 internationally, but not becoming a hit in the United States until 2000. It was Gray's biggest hit to date. It peaked at number six in the United Kingdom, number five in the United States, and number one in both Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland.

At the 2000 Grammy Awards, "I Try" won "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance", and was also nominated for "Record of the Year" and "Song of the Year".

"I Try" was released in the UK on two CD singles including remixes and the B-side "Don't Come Around".

Due to the touching lyrics and melody of "I Try", the song was eventually used in the "Goodbye (2)" episode of the American sitcom Spin City, originally aired on May 24, 2000. It was played as the background music in the final bar scene where Michael J. Fox's character Michael Patrick Flaherty leaves the show.

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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #118

FOUR songs needing facts:

Twilight Zone - Golden Earring (1982)

I Wouldn't Want To Be Like You - Alan Parsons Project (1977)

Only Time - Enya (2000)

Montego Bay - Bobby Bloom (1970

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Montego Bay"

Bobby Bloom

Written by Jeff Barry and Bobby Bloom. Released in September 1970, it reached #8 in US charts. It´s about the Jamaican city Montego.

Wikipedia:

Montego Bay is a city in Jamaica...The name "Montego Bay" is believed to have originated as a corruption of the Spanish word manteca ("lard"), allegedly because during the Spanish period it was the port where lard, leather, and beef were exported. Jamaica was a colony of Spain from 1511 until 1655 when Oliver Cromwell's Caribbean expedition, the Western Design, drove the Spanish from the island. Christopher Columbus, when he first visited the island in 1494, named the bay Golfo de Buen Tiempo ('Fair Weather Gulf')
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"Twilight Zone(When The Bullet Hits The Bone)"

Golden Earring

Wtitten by George Kooymans. Performed by Dutch heavy rock band Golden Earring. Released in 1982 as a track of their album "Cut". Also released as a single that went to #10 in the US charts and was also a hit in Europe. It was a #1 hit in Holland.

The video for the song was also a hit on MTV.

According Wikipedia,

Lead vocals on the song are performed first by George Kooymans (who sings up to, and including, the line "maybe my connection's tired of taking chances"), then by Barry Hay who sings the rest of the song. If the the first 5 or 6 seconds of the song is played in reverse, the words "Sirens in my head, my whole life spins into" can be heard. These are part of the lyrics for the song, although the that exact line does not appear in the song itself.

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"Only Time"

Enya

Written by Enya and Roma Ryan. Released as a single in November 2000, it is also a track of her album "A Day Without Rain". A remix of this song was re-released again in 2001. It´s Enya´s biggest hit and it reached #10 in the Billboard Hot 100.

In 2001 "Only Time" was released again as a remix.

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"I Wouldn´t Want To Be Like You"

Alan Parsons Project

Written by Alan Parsons and Eric Woolfson. Released in June 1977 as a track of the album "I, Robot" and also as a single.

Featuring Lenny Zakatek on lead vocals.

:help: :help: :help:

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"I Wouldn´t Want To Be Like You"

Alan Parsons Project

Written by Alan Parsons and Eric Woolfson. Released in June 1977 as a track of the album "I, Robot" and also as a single.

Featuring Lenny Zakatek on lead vocals.

:help: :help: :help:

it charted #36 on the US hot 100

Source

it's said to be about the conflict between robots and humans and might have something to do with Asimov's book "I robot"

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Merci, Sébastien!! ;)

I also found this on wikipedia:

It was intended to be based on the I, Robot stories written by Isaac Asimov, and actually Woolfson spoke with Asimov which was enthusiastic about that. But the rights had already been granted to a TV/movie company, so the album's title was altered slightly by removing the comma, and the theme and lyrics were made to be more generically about robots rather than specific to the Asimov universe.

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Edna, I had frond about the same last night but lost power before I could add it. I didn't get a chance to check for band sites and see what they have to offer.

I'll try again tonight. The weather here is terrible :beady: :puppyeyes:

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"I Wouldn´t Want To Be Like You"

Alan Parsons Project

It is the second track of the I Robot Album. It was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, England and was produced by Alan Parsons; Eric Woolfson.

I Robot is the story of the rise of machine and the decline of man, which paradoxically coincided with his discovery of the wheel...

And a warning that his brief dominance of this planet will probably end, because man tried to create robot in his own image.

Quoted from Amazon reveiws.

"I Robot", originally released in 1977, was the second release from the Alan Parsons Project. It is a prog-rock concept album

I can find more on the entire album then on the song. This is about all I've been able to locate.

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Thankyou edna, Viaene & Lea! :bow:

The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten #119

Just two songs missing facts this week:

I Need to Know - Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers (1978)

Easy To Be Hard - Three Dog Night (1969)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

The Songfish thanks you.

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"Easy To Be Hard"

Three Dog Nght

Released in 1969. It was their first Gold record and it reached #4 in the U.S. charts.

The ong was written by Galt MacDermot/James Rado/Gerome Ragni for "Hair", the musical, in 1967.

Allmusic said:

Easy to Be Hard" became Three Dog Night's highest-charting single to date, reaching number four in the summer of 1969. The track was a key component in the original 1967 score to the off-Broadway Hair, although it is undeniably the soulful version extracted from Three Dog Night's 1969 LP Suitable for Framing that yielded the hit. Chuck Negron's emotive lead vocals and Jimmy Greenspoon's hauntingly poignant keyboards are prominently displayed and undoubtedly vital elements in the success of their interpretation. Within the context of the stage play, the character Sheila sings "Easy to Be Hard" as a plaintive ballad of unrequited love. At various times during the Broadway production's early run, both Diane Keaton and Melba Moore played Sheila, but Lynn Kellogg's heartfelt reading is featured on the Hair original Broadway cast recording. It became a concert favorite for Three Dog Night, and an inspired rendition can be found on 1969's Captured Live at the Forum. The re-formed Three Dog Night (minus Chuck Negron) worked it into their ive with the Tennessee Symphony Orchestra DVD release in 2002, while Negron included "Easy to Be Hard" on 1999's Long Road Back and 2001's Chuck Negron Live in Concert. A multitude of other artists have also covered the number, most notably Jennifer Warnes, Sergio Mendes, Shirley Bassey, and Golden Smog, among others.
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Miss Shawna shamed me into submitting:

I believe that Johnny sung it on his show before it was officially released. The Network tried to make him say the line "wishin' Lord that I was home" instead of "stoned". He agreed, prior to the show, recorded live. With Kristofferson sitting in the audience, he clearly sang the line as it was written "wishing Lord that I was stoned" saying later that the meaning of the song would have been changed totally, and he wasn't about to change another musicians' lyric with him sitting in the audience.

That bit was remembered from a CMT special on Kris Kristofferson. Wiki's facts are a bit more spare, but do back me up:

Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down" is a song written by Kris Kristofferson that appeared on Kristofferson's first album. The original version of the song was recorded by Ray Stevens in 1969 and became his first country chart hit reaching #55 on the country charts and #81 on the pop Top 100. A cover of it by country legend Johnny Cash gained great popularity, garnering the Country Music Association Award for "Song of the Year" in 1970. Johnny Cash's version was titled "Sunday Morning Coming Down".

In 1971, Cash sang the song live on his television show Johnny Cash and Friends. The show's executives demanded that he change the lyric, "wishing, Lord, that I was stoned," in order not to offend family audiences, but Cash sang the song exactly as was written (except changing "cursin' at a can that he was kickin'" to "playin' with a can that he was kickin'"). "Sunday Morning Coming Down" was put on CMT's 100 greatest songs of all time.

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