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The Songfactor's Choice Top Ten Facts

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"Walls Came Down, The"

The Call

Written by Michael Been.

A track of their 1983 album, "Modern Romans"

The single, B-sided by "Destination", made #74 on Billboard Hot 100 and #17 on Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks.

"There was a great deal happening politically - Grenada, Lebanon, or the government saying the Russians are evil and the Russian government probably saying the same about us. That kind of thinking inspired me to write the last lines of 'Walls Came Down'."

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Trippin On A Hole In A Paper Heart - STP

According to an interview with Scott Weiland, the song's singer and writer, "the very ambiguous and mysterious lyrics to the song actually alluded to a very bad experience dropping acid. In his autobiography Not Dead and Not For Sale, he adds that it reflects his hunger for redemption".

Core music written by drummer Eric Wentz.

Nominated for a Grammy for Best Hard Rock Performance.

#36 in the US

#1 on Album Rock Tracks and Modern Rock Tracks, the bands 6th and last song to reach #1 on the rock charts.

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Love You To Death - Type O Negative

This song is about a man (the singer) falling in love with a woman who he is unsure feels the same way in return, as described with the repeated closing lyrics "Am I good enough for you".

The music video for this song that was banned on MTV because the girl in the clip buried a baby doll and MTV thought it was symbolic of abortion.

The single did not chart, but was the first single released off the album October Rust which peaked at #42 on the Billboard Album Charts.

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According to Allmusic.com Trouble written by Lowell George was a sublimely reworked "Willin". From the 1972 album Sailin' Shoes. Besides being a good slide guitar player it also showed that Lowell George could write ballads.

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The Songfactor's Top 10 #382

This week there is 5(five) songs needing facts.

The Songfactor's Choice Top 10 #382

1. Black Train – Montrose (1975)

2. I'd Much Rather Be With The Boys – The Rolling Stones (1975)

3. Lightning Strikes – Aerosmith (1982)

4. Perfect Strangers – Deep Purple (1984)

5. Younger Girl – Lovin' Spoonful (1965)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you

:guitar: :drummer: :rock:

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"Black Train"

Montrose

Written by Kardt-Richards-Fried

The last track of their album "Warner Bros. Presents... Montrose!", from September 1975.

The song is "a blistering pre-Speed Metal cover of a Montrose-related song that was never released "., according Wikipedia.

It's about a friend of Kendall Kardt who died of a heroin overdose. He wrote it in a country & western style, in 1971 for its solo album "Buddy Bolden". Jerry Garcia played pedal steel guitar and Ronnie Montrose did Hawaiian lap steel. The album wasn't released but Montrose included his new version on the 1975 album, more agressive. Ronnie Montrose insisted on the fact that the band was anti-drugs and didn't drink alcohol.

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"I'd Much Rather Be With The Boys"

The Rolling Stones

Written by Andrew Loog Oldham and Keith Richards.

A track from their album "Metamorphosis" released in June 1975.

Recorded in the summer of 1964.

What follows is a true relic, the misanthropic and hilariously hostile "I'd Much Rather Be with the Boys." Perhaps it's old management's knife in the ribs with a twist. The incredible lyric — "I'd much rather be with the boys/Than girls like you" — and lame surf harmonies readily explain why the tune was never unleashed on the innocent fans. Oldham takes a songwriting credit here, which could explain this callow lapse of professional standards. One must pity the artists for this minor humiliation while remembering that they chose to record it in the first place. The crude song seems pathetic and funny now; had it been released it might have badly altered their careers.

"I'd Much Rather Be With the Boys" is a unique item in the Rolling Stones' catalog in that it bears not the usual Mick Jagger-Keith Richards songwriting credit, but the collaborative byline of Richards and early Rolling Stones manager/producer Andrew Loog Oldham. Oldham had contributed with Mick and Keith to "As Tears Go By," but in this case Jagger didn't get a credit at all. It's also of interest because, of the dozen or so Rolling Stones-written songs of the mid-'60s that the group decided not to release themselves at that time (or sometimes ever), it's the best. That's not to say it's great, but it has a pretty good pop-soul-British Invasion sort of melody, ersatz Four Seasons backup harmonies, and Oldham's usual sub-Phil Spector production touches with a pseudo-"Be My Baby" drum pattern, echoing piano, and handclaps. That steel-sounding guitar sure sounds out of place, but the lyrics are way better than they are on most other early Stones discards, with its proud defiance that values security with the gang over a recently broken romance. Some people have found a gay context to the lyrics -- he'd much rather be with the boys than with girls like this one -- but it could just have been unwittingly clumsy lyric construction for songwriters who were barely turning professional. The Four Seasons comparisons rear their heads for the fadeout, with high-singing backup vocalists repeating a part of the chorus like a taunt. Another unusual aspect of "I'd Much Rather Be With the Boys" was that this was one instance where the version by the group the Rolling Stones gave it away to, the Toggery Five, was both much different than and better than the demo eventually released on the Stones' Metamorphosis collection in the mid-'70s. the Toggery Five's version (issued in 1965) wasn't a hit, but it gives the song a somewhat more Drifters-type rhythm, a dramatic intro of clanging guitar chords and percussive bashes, well-arranged backup harmonies that don't sound like a silly Four Seasons approximation, and a straighter, more emotional interpretation than the rather half-serious demo. Too, they change the melody a little on the bridge and actually improve it by putting in a more dramatic chord progression. In spite of its obscurity, "I'd Much Rather Be With the Boys" was covered by other artists after the 1960s, Nikki Sudden doing it in the 1980s and the Reigning Sound cutting it in the early 2000s.

There's a version called "I'd Much Rather Be With The Grils" by Donna Lynn, from 1975. She was 14.

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"Lightning Strikes"

Aerosmith

Written by Steven Tyler, Jimmy Crespo and Richie Supa.

A track of their album "Rock in a Hard Place", from August 1982.

Also the first single released from the album.

It made #21 on the U.S. Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.

Brad Whitford, the former guitar player, left the band before the song was released so the next guitar, Jimmy Crespo, recorded the track again.

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"Perfect Strangers"

Deep Purple

Written by Blackmore, Gillan and Glover.

A track from their album "Perfect Strangers", from September 1984.

The single was released in 1985 B-sided by "Son of Alerik" made #48 in the UK Singles chart and #12

on the US Hot Mainstream Rock chart.

This song is about reincarnation. It's a conversation between oneself from their past life and their present self. The song tells about memories this person has from their past life, but they (past and present self) "must remain perfect strangers" to each other.

Though there is no guitar solo on this song, Ritchie Blackmore said that it's his favorite song from the band.

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"Younger Girl"

Lovin' Spoonful

Written by John Sebastian

A track from their debut album, "Do You Believe in Magic", released in November 1965.

The Critters released their version in 1966 and it made #38 in the UK lists.

The song is basically Prison Wall Blues (1930) by Cannon's Jug Stompers, with a few lyrical changes.

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The Songfactor's Top 10 #383

This week there is 3(Three) songs needing facts.

The Songfactor's Choice Top 10 #383

1. Yes, I Will – The Hollies(1965)

2. Breakin' All The House Rules – Budgie (1975)

3. Jezebel – Herman's Hermits (1967)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you

:guitar: :drummer: :rock:

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The Songfactor's Top 10 #383

This week there is 3(Three) songs needing facts.

The Songfactor's Choice Top 10 #383

1. Yes, I Will – The Hollies(1965)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you

:guitar: :drummer: :rock:

Released in the UK on Parlophone on 22/01/65, backed with Nobody, making #9 :thumbsup:

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"Breakin' All The House Rules"

Budgie

Written by Tony Bourge and Burke Shelley.

The opening track of their album "Bandolier", released in September 1975.

Wasn't released as a single.

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"Jezebel"

Herman's Hermits

Written by Wayne Shanklin.

First recorded by Frankie Laine in April 1951.

The Herman's Hemits included the song on their February 1967 album, "here's a Kind of Hush All Over the World".

It wasn't released as a single.

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"Jezebel"

Herman's Hermits

Written by Wayne Shanklin.

First recorded by Frankie Laine in April 1951.

The Herman's Hemits included the song on their February 1967 album, "here's a Kind of Hush All Over the World".

It wasn't released as a single.

Not in the US or UK, possibly, but it was (on EPs) in Thailand, Argentina and Brazil! :inlove:

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The Songfactor's Top 10 #384

This week there is 6(six) songs needing facts.

The Songfactor's Choice Top 10 #384

1. Girl's Got Rhythm – AC/DC (1979)

2. Groovin is Easy – The Electric Flag (1968)

3. Blind Eye – Uriah Heep (1972)

4. 3 A.M. – Matchbox 20 (1996)

5. You – Candlebox (1993)

6. Just Because – Lloyd Price (1957)

If you have any info on any of the songs mentioned anywhere in this thread, please feel free to post your knowledge here. Submissions on songs will be collated and sent to the main site and you will receive credit for your contribution.

As always the Songfish thanks you

:guitar: :drummer: :rock:

Edited by Guest

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"Just Because"

Lloyd Price

Written by Lloyd Price.

Released as a single in February 1957, B-sided by "Why".

It was the first single released by KRC Records, a company he formed with with Harold Logan and Bill Boskent.

It made#3 on theR&B charts and #29 on the Pop lists.

It was included in 1960 in his LP "Mr. Personality's Big 15".

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"You"

Candlebox

Written by Candlebox.

Recorded in 1992.

Also called "F**k You".

A track of their 1993 album, "Candlebox".

The second single released, B-sided by "Pull Away".

It made #78 on Billboard Hot 100, #6 on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks and and #18 on Modern Rock Tracks charts.

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"3 A.M."

Matchbox 20

Written by Rob Thomas, Brian Yale, Leslie Goff and John Joseph Stanley

A track of their 1996 album "Yourself or Someone Like You".

Released as their third single from the album.

It made #3 on US Billboard Hot 100, #2 on US Billboard Top 40 Mainstream, #3 on US Billboard Hot Modern Rock Tracks, #1 on US Billboard Hot Adult Top 40 Tracks and #2 on

US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks.

It also charted in Canada, making #1 on Top Singles, Canada Alternative 30 and Canada Adult Contemporary.

This song was written by Rob Thomas, Jay Stanley, John Goff and Brian Yale while performing together in the early 1990s band Tabitha's Secret. The lyrics are inspired by Thomas as an adolescent having to live with a mother fighting to survive cancer

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