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I've compiled some questions that I wondered about the answers to but didn't think necessarily merited their own posts.

1) In the Beatle's song "The End" who plays which guitar solo? I can pretty distinctly hear three different solos being played, but have no idea who plays which one.

2) Does anybody else own the Velvet Underground's "Loaded" and have noticed that the times of the songs on the sleeve are different than the actual play times of the songs?

3) At the end of the movie "Quadrophenia", Jimmy doesn't go off the cliff with the bike, right? What does that mean?

4) In the Pink Floyd song "Matilda Mother" at 1:58 is the splicing of two takes as bad as it sounds or is it just some scratch on my CD?

5) Is Terry Kath not the most under rated guitar player of all time? Listen to the first few Chicago albums! He's incredible!

6) Why is Bruce Springsteen in the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame without the E Street Band?

7) (this isn't a real question but...) Did anyone know that Lou Reed wrote "Heroin" while attending Syracuse...in 1964!? While the Beatles were writing:

"hold me, love me, hold me, love me,

ain't got nothin' but love, babe,

eight days a week"

Reed penned:

"Then I really don't care anymore

'bout all the Jim-Jims, in this town

and all the politian's makin', crazy sounds

and ev'rybody puttin' ev'rybody else down

and all the dead bodies piled up in mounds..."

And I guess, I just don't know. That's just amazing to me.

Please give me some feedback, and hopefully some answers. Thanks!

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JB wrote:

2) Does anybody else own the Velvet Underground's "Loaded" and have noticed that the times of the songs on the sleeve are different than the actual play times of the songs?

I've seen that happen before with other albums. My guess is that the final mix and edit are slightly different from the original time.

Are the times off by just a little bit or are they really off a lot?

6) Why is Bruce Springsteen in the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame without the E Street Band?

I would say because all of his albums with the exception of the live albums were released as Bruce Springsteen, with no mention of the E Street Band.

Although the same line -up of musicians were with him for the majority of the time, there were some personnel changes over the years and also Bruce's dissolving of the E-Street Band in 1989 and re-assembling them in 1995.

Unlike most solo artists who don't name their back-up band, he's a solo artist with a name for his back-up band, and the spotlight is on Bruce Springsteen.

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Did anyone know that Lou Reed wrote "Heroin" while attending Syracuse...in 1964!?

"Then I really don't care anymore

'bout all the Jim-Jims, in this town

and all the politian's makin', crazy sounds

and ev'rybody puttin' ev'rybody else down

and all the dead bodies piled up in mounds..."

And I guess, I just don't know. That's just amazing to me.

Please give me some feedback, and hopefully some answers. Thanks!

I know from many interviews and articles I read since the early seventies, and also from people that knows Lou Reed, that he actually never was the pathetic junky this song would make people think he was. In fact, I believe he was a tourist with heroin, experienced it under the influence of William Burroughs books (it was trendy in the early sixties to take drugs as LSD, heroin or cocaine), of course had some slight withdrawals and knows what it means, and wrote about it in an intellectual way. Not as Keith Richards, who choosed that way of life and has to be stoned constantly (bourbon and weed after the heroin decades are over); Reed is a bit snob and he´s really very wise.

Here are some interesting points of view.

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1) In the Beatle's song "The End" who plays which guitar solo? I can pretty distinctly hear three different solos being played, but have no idea who plays which one.

3) At the end of the movie "Quadrophenia", Jimmy doesn't go off the cliff with the bike, right? What does that mean?

1) It's Paul, George and John playing one after another in that order, which means Paul--George--John--Paul--George--John--Paul--George--John.

3) Do you mean the deeper meaning of it? i suppose it's fairly uncertain, but the way I look at it, it means he's done with all the Mod stuff. He saw Sting (can't remember what he's called in the film) working as a bell boy, and then threw his bike off the cliff. I suppose that shows that he's pissed of with being a mod, because Sting in the film was THE mod idol.

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I know from many interviews and articles I read since the early seventies, and also from people that knows Lou Reed, that he actually never was the pathetic junky this song would make people think he was. In fact, I believe he was a tourist with heroin

why does that discredit him as a songwriter? and no one should say because he presented himself as something he's not, because that's the whole nature of the business. The Who weren't really mods, Kit Lambert just presented them that way so they'd have a following. it can be disputed if the Clash were really "punks" in the sense that they were shown to be when they first appeared. "the Clash" is one hell of a punk album, but we see once they were allowed to make the kind of music they wanted to make they strayed more towards songs with horn sections and reggae beats. could it be that they rode the punk wave that was big at the time to get where they got? I love all these bands but in order for any of us to have heard of them they needed to get big, by playing off of what was big at the time. Lou Reed just happened to do songs on things that, while they may have been big at the time, were too controversial to sell records.

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why does that discredit him as a songwriter?

It doesn´t. He makes great songs. I like his music and I´ve seen him live many times. Playing the junky would be part of his performance: it´s a show, it´s not real life. I might respect him or not as a person but I love him as an artist.

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On point 7, do we know that the Beatles weren't writing deeper lyrics in 1964...NO we don't. We know the songs that were released were for commercial success. Lou Reed couldn't have gotten that one released back then. We don't know what the Beatles wrote but held back.

Maybe Reed could have released this in '64 though:

You broke my heart and you made me cry

you said that I couldn't dance

But now I'm back to let you know

that I can really make romance

You do what you gotta do

you do everything you can

You do what you wanna do

hey, but I love you, Suzanne

You do anything once

you try anything twice

You so what you gotta do

hey, but I love you, Suzanne, hey, hey

Do what you wanna do

you do what you can

You do what you wanna do

but I love you, Suzanne

I love you when you're good

baby, I love you when you're bad

You do what you gotta do

hey, but I love you, Suzanne

Do what you wanna do

hey, baby, do what you can

You do what you wanna do, baby

but I love you, Suzanne

I know you, try anything once, baby

you try anything twice

Do what you gotta do

but I love you, Suzanne

I love you when you're good, baby

I love you when you're bad

Do what you wanna do

ooohhh, but I love you, Suzanne, hey, hey

Hey, I love you, Suzanne

I love you, Suzanne

I love you, Suzanne

oh, sweet ...

Do what you wanna do

hey, you do what you can

You do what you wanna do

hey, but I love you, Suzanne

You try anything once

you do anything twice

Do what you wanna do

you know that I love you, Suzanne

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