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Rate the last thing you read


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its an enthralling romp through a worldview that is not only surprisingly deep but also well-rounded and provocative i found myself poring through each page with bated breath confounded by questions though i must say the fauxlosophic narration left me quite disquieted.

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Sorry to interrupt this conversation, but I´m curious...

Poor J.D., got killed because he wrote a book. Although a recluse, he was a really great writer, knew what he was talking about.

Who are you talking about? :P Salinger? Got killed? He´s still alive... I must be missing somehting... :P

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its an enthralling romp through a worldview that is not only surprisingly deep but also well-rounded and provocative i found myself poring through each page with bated breath confounded by questions though i must say the fauxlosophic narration left me quite disquieted.

I'm not sure how to rate it . . . it never made it to the audiences' scale!

:D

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Sorry to interrupt this conversation, but I´m curious...

Who are you talking about? :P Salinger? Got killed? He´s still alive... I must be missing somehting... :P

I wondered about that, too, Edna. But then I figured since poetrychick seems like a very deep individual, perhaps she's using it as a metaphor for "he took a beating in the press" or some such.

I read Catcher in the Rye a few years back. Because I was - and still am - determined to read as many classics as I can get my hands on (more than occasionally interrupted by trashy stuff that are often easier reads :grin: ). At any rate, I found it to be quite a slog. Too dry and dense for my feeble mind.

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I quite enjoyed it, it was well written. not one of my favourites but I think it's definitely worth reading.

anyway not everything has to be to everyone's taste, right? I kept hearing how great "on the road" was, and how it defined a generation, and frankly I got bored I stopped reading halfway through

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I read Catcher in the Rye when I was 14, I did like it, I HAD to like it by then... just like Poe, Nietzche, Lovecraft, Baudelaire and so many classics that were so trendy in the late sixties/early seventies.

I re-read most of them later on and some are still amazing books (1984, Steppenwolf, Mme Bovary)

But I don´t think I´d read Salinger again. Or Philip Roth.

Of course I read "On The Road" but I didn t like it. Just like Burrough´s books. Or Tom Wolfe (though I worship his novels :bow: :bow: )

I finished my Tenessee Williams novels yesterday and I´m reading three books of Andreï Makine, a French -Russian writter.

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Of course I read "On The Road" but I didn t like it. Just like Burrough´s books. Or Tom Wolfe (though I worship his novels :bow: :bow: )

Thank you, I'm glad someone agrees with me! I sort of like Burroughs though, liked queer and junkie but hated naked lunch. I didn't manage to finish it.

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Tim, I think she was being facetious. No?

Thank you, I'm glad someone agrees with me! I sort of like Burroughs though, liked queer and junkie but hated naked lunch. I didn't manage to finish it.

Rach, couldn't finish your naked lunch? Tsk, tsk. Don't come looking for your pudding.

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