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For some reason I cant post on the other board so I will post here.

I'm doing an essay on how the 'gothic' genre has changed over the years, I need to select 4 texts and explain.

SO far the two texts I have picked are Frankenstein and Edward Scissor Hands. I'm looking for a song and a poem to have 4 different texts.

For the songs the shortlist has:

1999 - Prince (listen to the lyrics than you may see the 'gothic' in it.

Enter Sandman - Metallica.

Before you reccomend me any songs, please I dont want any from gothic bands, because the lyrics are meaningless and impossible to analyse.

And if you can, can you please elaborate on the two texts I have mentioned previously.

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Before you reccomend me any songs, please I dont want any from gothic bands, because the lyrics are meaningless and impossible to analyse.

I think you'll find that the best way to talk about how gothic genre has changed, is to examine as much as you can, not just to say 'gothic lyrics' are meaningless, you obviously haven't listened to alot of this music?

IMO the lyrics by particular bands in the gothic genre have huge meaning. For example, if you looked into the Sisters Of Mercy, you would find that the majority of their songs are about human suffering through wars etc. They have huge meaning, you just have to dig below the surface to find it. Sites like 1959 and all that... can help in the analysis of SoM lyrics.

Are you considering Bauhaus, The Cure, etc?

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Before you reccomend me any songs, please I dont want any from gothic bands, because the lyrics are meaningless and impossible to analyse

How are you doing a project on "gothic" music without analysing "gothic" bands. Like Foxy recommended Sisters of Mercy - none of their lyrics are "meaningless" or impossible to analyse, they sometimes just require some research or deeper thought. Don't give up! Maybe you don't like that style of music, but that is no reason to generalise and say it is meaningless. Try something like Bauhaus, or type O negative, or Blind Guardian. Alot of the songs have political or religious themes or are just clandestine and "dark".

Double Dare

I dare you, to be real

To touch a flickering flame

The pangs of dark delight

Don't cower in night fright

Don't back away just yet

From destinations set

I dare you to be proud

To dare to shout aloud

For convictions that you feel

Like sound from bells to peal

I dare you to speak of your despise

For bureaucracy, hypocrisy...all liars

I dare

I dare

I dare...you...you

"Goth" lyrics are no more complex or easy to understand as any other song type, alot of other styles need you to read into the meaning, just browse through the Q&A forum and you will see how many songs require study and analysis before they are somewhat understood. Good luck with your project, please post your notes here so we can learn a little too :thumbsup:

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I've never really understood how the Cure ended up being a goth band... a crackingly good rock/pop band with some moody bits on the albums (and the first couple of singles) but I just can't see the Goth bit...a great essay would conclusively demonstrate how Friday I'm in Love, Love Cats and Hot Hot Hot are archetypal Goth tunes...that I'd like to read :D They are to Goth what Costello, Squeeze and the Police were to Punk....JMHO ::

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The Cure were created in Crawley, Sussex (England), in 1978 as a mix of psychedelic beat and post-punk tradition. Robert Smith (*1959), Laurence Tolhurst (*1959) and bassist Michael Dempsey came together, label owner Chris Perry took them to the studio where the Cure recorded their debut single Killing An Arab (1979). Four weeks later this was followed by their album Three Imaginary Boys. After another few singles and a tour, Dempsey left the group. He was replaced by Simon Gallup (B), keyboard-player Mathieu Hartley also joined them. The quartet had a success in 1980 with their album 17 Seconds (UK number 20). Without Hartley, they published the album Faith (UK number 7) in 1981. They continued on their road to success with a mix of punk and pop in the mid-80s. Porl Thompson replaced Thornhally (in 1983, B). In 1985, Gallup, who had left the band in 1982, rejoined the Cure. They had one success after another up to the early 1990s.

Psychedelic beat and post-punk pop...methinks....not Goth

::

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ok, Gothic music is NOT meaningless. The late 70s and early 80s are full of competent and capable bands. Goth developped from post-punk. Bands like Joy Division, Bauhaus and Incubus Succubus. Echoey, dark and brooding. Plus the stories behind the bands are always interesting. As for the Cure. I don't think they're goth, I saw Dark Wave thrown out there, thats a good way to classify them.

Honestly though, they were just a post-punk band that goth fans latched onto. I think it mostly has to do with the image and sound of Robert Smith. But if you want proof of their goth leanings check out "Pornography" an epic album.

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As for the Cure. I don't think they're goth, I saw Dark Wave thrown out there, thats a good way to classify them.

Honestly though, they were just a post-punk band that goth fans latched onto. I think it mostly has to do with the image and sound of Robert Smith.

Sisters Of Mercy, anyone :beatnik:

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Come on, JuanCa, I´m sure you know more than the rest of us about that kind of sound...

Nick Cave would be goth? I always found the Cure so very pop... I like them very much. Joy Division, New Order, Bauhaus seem to me very much obscure than Robert Smith... even iggy pop has many obscure songs.

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Come on, JuanCa, I´m sure you know more than the rest of us about that kind of sound...

Nick Cave would be goth? I always found the Cure so very pop... I like them very much. Joy Division, New Order, Bauhaus seem to me very much obscure than Robert Smith... even iggy pop has many obscure songs.

Well, for one, I don't think of Gothic as a "lifestyle," but, rather, as just a "style" - whether it be architecture, writing, fashion, and modern music. I don't know if obscurity has anything to do with it either, but since it is a subcultural phenomena it's not surprising a lot of it doesn't get recognition. The Cure is about as "goth" as Depeche Mode. Meaning, yeah, a lotta people who enjoy gothic music will latch on to them because they share some qualities in their craft, but they're not according-to-Hoyle goth bands. I'm thinking Christian Death/Rozz Williams, Red Lorry Yellow Lorry, Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds, The Virgin Prunes, March Of Violets, Siouxsie And The Banshees, early Tuxedomoon (pre-Holy Wars), Clan Of Xymox, that sort of thing. Some of it could also called "Death Rock". At least, that's what I remember the kids in my hs calling it.

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the cure, as i said before, as generally classified as new dark wave, and so are depeche mode.

how are siouxie and the banshees goth then?

Martin L. Gore was quoted as saying in the 80s they were into making mainstream Pop music. I dunno why Siouxsie would be more goth. We should get our measuring sticks for this ::

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