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RonJonSurfer

Top 10 Forgotten Classic Rock Albums

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I love this list. I'll come up with my own, but need to think about it...how about you? BTW, if you never listened to ANY of these albums...please do.

1) Spirit - Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus (1970)

Although Spirit had their only hit, "I Got a Line on You," the previous year, it was 1970's Dr. Sardonicus that earned them a permanent place in rock history. This stunning blend of rock, jazz and folk captures the experience of a sleepless night that drags on endlessly. If you're nostalgic for the days when albums were great from beginning to end, this final release from the original lineup is a must. Buy it, if for nothing else than to once again hear "Nature's Way" in all its etherial beauty.

2) Traffic - The Low Spark Of High Heeled Boys (1971)

The Low Spark Of High Heeled Boys is more like a journey than a collection of songs; with Steve Winwood at the helm, the flute of Chris Wood, Jim Capaldi's percussion and Ric Grech on bass, one would expect no less. While not abandoning the folk nuances of their previous release, "John Barleycorn Must Die," Low Spark broadens the palette. The 12-minute title track, as well as "Rock & Roll Stew," take you back to the early days of FM rock radio. The entire album is absolutely transcendental.

3) Badfinger - Straight Up (1971)

After living in the shadow of the Beatles for too long, Badfinger was finally coming into their own with 1971's Straight Up. After mild success with 1970's "No Dice," this is the one where it all came together. Produced by George Harrison and Todd Rundgren, it contained the hits "Baby Blue" and "Day After Day." Sadly, it was only a matter of time before bad management took its toll on Badfinger, resulting in the suicides of two members. One can only wonder what heights they might have reached.

4) Jo Jo Gunne - Jo Jo Gunne (1972)

Jo Jo Gunne was the classic hippie-boogie band of the early seventies, and 1972's self-titled album was chock full of great, mindless rock and roll. Formed by ex-Spirit member Jay Ferguson and Mark Andes, who would later form Firefall, Jo Jo Gunne recorded four albums between 1972 and 1974. Among the highlights are FM single "Run Run Run" and "Shake That Fat." This is good-time 70s rock at its absolute finest!

5) The Zombies - Odessey & Oracle (1968)

This 1968 landmark psychedelic pop-rock album (although it transcends categorization), is often called Britain's version of "Pet Sounds." When you combine Rod Argent's songwriting genius with Colin Blunstone's husky vocals, then add imaginative harmonies, exceptional arrangements and clean production flavored with classical tendencies, the result is Odessey & Oracle. How fitting that the quintessential hippie anthem, "Time of the Season," is the final song on this, the Zombies' final album.

6) Blind Faith - Blind Faith (1969)

Blind Faith may be the best lone album ever released by a band. At first it seemed the mix of Traffic's folk and eclectic jazz, brought on board by Steve Winwood, and Cream's British blues, courtesy of Eric Clapton, would create the "super group" to end all super groups. However, chaotic touring and over-hype doomed the band from its very inception. In the middle of it all was this one haunting album, which still sounds as fresh and original as it did in 1969. More's the pity.

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7) Love - Forever Changes (1967)

This 1967 album is like Herb Alpert meets Timothy Leary -- slightly reminiscent of early Moody Blues, a bit dark and brooding like The Doors, and with a touch of the Tijuana Brass thrown in. Sounds like an odd mix yet Love's Forever Changes, with singer/songwriter Arthur Lee at the front, is such an intense blend of musical stylings that it's difficult to categorize -- yet hard to resist. If you're an open-minded classic rock fan with a taste for the eclectic, then this trippy album is for you.

Read Review

8) Moby Grape - Moby Grape (1967)

This 1967 debut album was released at a time when all band members wrote, arranged, played and sang. The balance of four-part harmonies and three guitars led to one of the best classic albums of all time. Sadly, the band became the victim of their own talents; five singles from this album were released at once, and the result was overkill. For all their powerful, rip-roaring rock and roll, Moby Grape should have been one of the greatest American bands. For a brief time, they actually were.

9) Captain Beyond - Captain Beyond (1972)

Before heavy metal, even before hard rock, there was Captain Beyond. Formed by former members of Iron Butterfly and Deep Purple, their 1972 self-titled debut album was classy and melodic without being overbearing. The tracks were catchy and short; they're complex pieces that flow seamlessly from one to another yet still manage to knock your socks off. After 30 years the consciousness-altering, spacey band still enjoys a cult following, and it's easy to understand why.

10) Frijid Pink - Frijid Pink (1970)

Any fan of sixties-style psychedelic rock would enjoy this 1970 self-titled album. Frijid Pink captures the band in their prime, and silenced critics who charged them with being a one-hit wonder with their edgy cover of "House Of The Rising Sun." The original garage band, with their fuzzy, blues-inspired Detroit rock n' roll, took wah-wah to a new level and set the precedent for smokey, husky vocals and effected guitar work. Truly a must for fans of MC5, Iron Butterfly, Steppenwolf and Cream.

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5) The Zombies - Odessey & Oracle (1968)

This 1968 landmark psychedelic pop-rock album (although it transcends categorization), is often called Britain's version of "Pet Sounds." When you combine Rod Argent's songwriting genius with Colin Blunstone's husky vocals, then add imaginative harmonies, exceptional arrangements and clean production flavored with classical tendencies, the result is Odessey & Oracle. How fitting that the quintessential hippie anthem, "Time of the Season," is the final song on this, the Zombies' final album.

I love this album. The Zombies were seriously underrated.

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7) Love - Forever Changes (1967)

This 1967 album is like Herb Alpert meets Timothy Leary -- slightly reminiscent of early Moody Blues, a bit dark and brooding like The Doors, and with a touch of the Tijuana Brass thrown in. Sounds like an odd mix yet Love's Forever Changes, with singer/songwriter Arthur Lee at the front, is such an intense blend of musical stylings that it's difficult to categorize -- yet hard to resist. If you're an open-minded classic rock fan with a taste for the eclectic, then this trippy album is for you.

The Love were an awesome band. I also liked very much the Zombies and Blind Faith.

But let me add a really underrated band: The Move. I think we discussed about it on another thread. Roy Wood was a real genius... though it was Jeff Lynne who got all the fame as he formed ELO later on...

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I'm just waiting for Karhul to jump in and say "Led Zeppelin IV."

I am not such an expert on forgotten classic rock albums. Since I was not around at that time, I only know of the famous ones.

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I'd Add:

The Electric Flag - A Long Time Comin' (1968)

The short-lived supergroup with Mike Bloomfield, Nick Gravenites, Buddy Miles, Harvey Brooks, Barry Goldberg, plus some hard-working horns delivered innovative psychedelic blues/rock/soul/jazz concoctions. This is still tasty, unique and different-sounding today.

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For you Love fans.

Old News.

from my post to another thread back in June, 2004

LOVE IS ALIVE

love_mug.jpg

In December 2001 Arthur Lee was released from prison after serving six years of a twelve year sentence (see Summer Of Love and All You Need Is Love). By June 2002 he was playing to a sell-out crowd in London, and was lionized by members of Parliament (see 60s Star Meets MPs). A new version of Love with Arthur Lee is currently on tour (see the Official Tour Site).

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Thank you, Bazooka! Your posts are always interesting... :thumbsup:

I love the Supersessions albums, with Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper. There is one I really like and it has also Steven Stills performing, they do a good cover of Donovan´s "Season of the Witch".

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Oh, no... I never knew much about them, I just really loved their music and saw them live once... would have been to more concerts if they have toured in Spain more often, but I just had the chance to see them by the end of the eighties...

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"The Who Sell Out" -The Who

as hard as it is to believe any Who stuff is forgotten, this '67 album doesn't seem to get any recognition from anyone. this album really covers all the bases of classic rock, there's pop, classic Who rock, funny comercials, and some selling out, just to include all the aspects. this is truely a great album that i recommend to anyone.

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I would add "Foreigner 4" (Foreigner) to this list. It was big at the time (1981) of release but it, and the band, quickly disappeared thereafter.
Was that the one with the circle thing on it that they show at the start of a film?

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our radio station plays forgotton classic albums every sunday night....they played A Space In Time...Ten Years After...I'd Love To Change The World is one of my favorites, but the rest of the album is good too.

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