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Earworms


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here's a video

the lyrics are actually quite funny :D

(bababaaaa...)

this is a wonderful song, a bit brainless but nice

this is a magical song, you can listen but you can't see it

so don't be sad, but smile and be happy

and have fun with the music from your radio

here we're singing a nice song, 100 percent g-rated

not a word of sex or violence, those times are over

we're not singing about these dirty stuffs

come on, we would never do that

(bababaaaa...

shoobeedoo...)

ill-humoured people may come at this time

to lecture us about a lack of intelligent standards

but for this instance we're already prepared

and we're going to react like this:

Schopenhauer, Hegel, Kant, Wittgenstein, Wittgenstein

Schopenhauer, Hegel, Kant, Wittgenstein, Wittgenstein

Platon, Popper, Cicero

Platon, Popper, Cicero

Jean-Paul Sartre, J-j-Jean-Paul-Sartre

Schopenhauer, Hegel, Kant, Wittgenstein, Wittgenstein

Heidegger, Sokrates, Nietzsche (booo!), Nietzsche (booo!)

[smaller]and Beate Uhse[/smaller]

soon the 3 minutes will be over, slowly it's going to be tough

and so we're gonna stop now with this finishing chorus

it doesn't hurt a soul, but it really goes into the ear

and doesn't even mention anything about someone getting laid

(bababaaaa...

shoobeedoo...)

:D

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's from German 'Ohrwurm'

that's correct :)

"Ohrwurm" is also actually the german name for the "earwig" too.

I couldn't find much for the source of it being used in a musical sense though, only that it wasn't used like that before the 20th century, and that the english form came from German in the mid to end of the 1980s :crazy:

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that's correct :)

"Ohrwurm" is also actually the german name for the "earwig" too.

I couldn't find much for the source of it being used in a musical sense though, only that it wasn't used like that before the 20th century, and that the english form came from German in the mid to end of the 1980s :crazy:

Well said, Levis and Farin.

Just goes to discount the obsolete saying that "you can't bend a tree once it's grown."

I've been grown for a long time but will never be too old to bend, i.e. (learn).

Thanks guys.

Both of you set a great example for the youth of this generation.

:)

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