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Carl

List #4

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How about one of the bands that started pushing the needle into the red?

The Yardbirds BBC Sessions disc is a fantastic collection of their best stuff, live, it's got samples of the Jeff Beck years, the Beck and Jimmy Page year or so, and then the Jimmy Page era, right up to them dissolving and turning into Led Zeppelin. 26 tracks in all, it's a must have.

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Flogging Molly - Swagger. It's the first release by Flogging Molly, and the one that sounds the most Irish. They play celtic punk, and are one of the only punk bands I like to listen to. Highlights include "Salty Dog" "Devils dance Floor" "Selfish Man" "Every Dog has his Day" and the 7 minute "Black Friday Rule." I would reccomend it to anyone who likes Irish music, or rock music. Play this CD really loud.

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I've been prompted, so I'll recommend 'Showbiz' by CUD again.

In a similar vein, what about 'His'N'Hers' by Pulp. Another quintisentially English album and a masterpiece IMO. I don't know if Pulp ever made it in the US, but you may be aware of Jarvis Cocker, the 'stick-insect' singer who mooned at Michael Jackson at an awards ceremony once. Good job he was an adult....

Regards

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I've been prompted, so I'll recommend 'Showbiz' by CUD again.

In a similar vein, what about 'His'N'Hers' by Pulp. Another quintisentially English album and a masterpiece IMO. I don't know if Pulp ever made it in the US, but you may be aware of Jarvis Cocker, the 'stick-insect' singer who mooned at Michael Jackson at an awards ceremony once. Good job he was an adult....

Regards

I second the Pulp recommendation. I wonder if that's counterproductive :beatnik:

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A re-nomination

Tapestry

Carole King

1971

Carole King started her career by writing pop songs in the 60s (some with her husband at the time Gerry Goffin) for such acts as the Shirelles, the Drifters, the Chiffons and Aretha Franklin. But in 1971 she released "Tapestry" and changed her title from songwriter to singer/songwriter. The album won 4 Grammys and yielded such hits as "I Feel The Earth Move", "So Far Away", and "It's Too Late". There are also 3 of Carole's renditions of songs she had written for other artists - "Natural Woman" for Aretha Franklin, "You've Got A Friend" for James Taylor and "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" for the Shirelle's. Her version of "Will You Still Love Me" has a much more adult feel than the girl group's.

What a great album ~ it's poppy, soulful, and has stood the test of time. I remember my mother playing this when I was a little girl, and all these years later, I am still playing it.

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A must! List #4

This is a must have for anyone's collection!!

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  • Shine On You Crazy Diamond
  • Astronomy Domine
  • What Do You Want From Me
  • Learning To Fly
  • Keep Talking
  • Coming Back To Life
  • Hey You
  • A Great Day For Freedom
  • Sorrow
  • High Hopes
  • Speak To Me
  • Breathe
  • On The Run
  • Time
  • The Great Gig In The Sky
  • Money
  • Us And Them
  • Any Colour You Like
  • Brain Damage
  • Eclipse

If you have not heard Dark Side of the Moon "LIVE" your are really missing out! That's all of Disc 2. Disc 1 is a collection of some real gems, my favs are SOYCD and LTF with bonus pair of awesome tunes CBTL and High Hopes!

Trust me if you listen to this twice all the way through... you will be transended to a greater height of musical awareness only paralleled by, well by other Pink Floyd music of course... what could be greater? Don't bother trying to answer this question, it's like "how big is the universe?"

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A re-nomination

Tapestry

Carole King

1971

Carole King started her career by writing pop songs in the 60s (some with her husband at the time Gerry Goffin) for such acts as the Shirelles, the Drifters, the Chiffons and Aretha Franklin. But in 1971 she released "Tapestry" and changed her title from songwriter to singer/songwriter. The album won 4 Grammys and yielded such hits as "I Feel The Earth Move", "So Far Away", and "It's Too Late". There are also 3 of Carole's renditions of songs she had written for other artists - "Natural Woman" for Aretha Franklin, "You've Got A Friend" for James Taylor and "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" for the Shirelle's. Her version of "Will You Still Love Me" has a much more adult feel than the girl group's.

What a great album ~ it's poppy, soulful, and has stood the test of time. I remember my mother playing this when I was a little girl, and all these years later, I am still playing it.

Wow, Peaches, this was one of my first albums!!!!! How could I forget about Carole King??? :doh: "Tapestry" is a masterpiece... Carole King is a great artist... Did you know she & Goffin wrote "Locomotion" for Little Eva, who was their daughter´s babysitter?

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The Lonesome Jubilee - John Cougar Mellencamp

This album yielded two hits "Paper In Fire" and "Cherry Bomb", but every song on the album is solid. IMO, this is his best work. By utilizing such instruments as the fiddle, dobro and banjo, Mellencamp gave these songs a unique style which distinguishes them from his earlier work.

:happybanana:

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The Lonesome Jubilee - John Cougar Mellencamp

This album yielded two hits "Paper In Fire" and "Cherry Bomb", but every song on the album is solid. IMO, this is his best work. By utilizing such instruments as the fiddle, dobro and banjo, Mellencamp gave these songs a unique style which distinguishes them from his earlier work.

:happybanana:

I second this nomination !!!!

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I second the Pulp recommendation. I wonder if that's counterproductive :beatnik:

I totally agreem pulp's earlier stuff is really cool although for me "common people" is the best. probably because it feels so personal!

im not sure how this works, but im going to add the cure's disintigration, one of my favourite albums, with two of my favourite songs, "love song" and "lullaby"

i also have a question, how come "wave of mutilation" by the pixies is said to be part of their best of? surely it should be doolittle, the original album.

and speaking of the pixies, how about "where is my mind?"

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I was surprised they'd choose a compilation over an album. I liked Doolittle the best, but I think it's because it's the first album that exposed me to the world of indie rock.

Btw, from what album did Pulp's "Death Goes To The Disco" come from? That one is my top favourite by them. I'm lazy and short on time to look for it myself =:P

kthxbye :)

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its from "pulp goes to the disco"

and looking at their discography just now, i remembered some other cool songs from their early stuff, like "masters of the universe" and "razzmatazz". I have them in some sort of early albums compilation called "on fire"

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Pulp were awesome, I listened to them day in and day out. :headphones: Common People, do you remember the first time, lipgloss, mis-shapes, year 2000, sorted for E's and wizz, help the aged, pencil skirt, tomorrow never lies - loved them all!

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How about The Complete Recordings of Robert Johnson? Learn a few people up where this blues/rock and roll stuff started. If nothing else people should do a search and read the real story behind "Crossroads". :rockon:

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Grover Washington Jr - Winelight

This personally is one of the best Jazz albums I've heard, the whole album is perfect for romancing seducing...

Sadly he never became a household name, which seems even more of a tragedy.

Grover Washington, Jr [+]., has long been one of the leaders in what could be called rhythm & jazz, essentially R&B-influenced jazz. Winelight [+] is one of his finest albums, and not primarily because of the Bill Withers [+] hit "Just the Two of Us." It is the five instrumentals that find Washington [+] (on soprano, alto and tenor) really stretching out. If he had been only interested in sales, Washington [+]'s solos could have been half as long and he would have stuck closely to the melody. Instead he really pushes himself on some of these selections, particularly the title cut. A memorable set of high-quality and danceable soul jazz.

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