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Farin

God is not the Creator, Bible wrongly translated, claims academic

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Zoroastrianism is my favourite but no one ever, ever pays attention that :( it's a monopoly of christians and atheists I tells you :mad:

I you believe in Zorro? I would not have guessed!

I believe in Claude.

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I haven't read excerpts of the Old Testament, no. Did that god really (er...) say that? that's lame. How can people willingly follow someone so, er, insecure? (Ganesh pwns you, 'god')

Oh, yeah. The Old Testament is rife with God's best foot-in-mouth moments. You know the instance where God asks old Abe to kill his son? Hahahah. I kid you not. God "tested" Abraham's faith by asking him to murder his own son.

22:3-10 Never was any gold tried in so hot a fire. Who but Abraham would not have argued with God? Such would have been the thought of a weak heart; but Abraham knew that he had to do with a God, even Jehovah. Faith had taught him not to argue, but to obey. He is sure that what God commands is good; that what he promises cannot be broken. In matters of God, whoever consults with flesh and blood, will never offer up his Isaac to God. The good patriarch rises early, and begins his sad journey. And now he travels three days, and Isaac still is in his sight! Misery is made worse when long continued. The expression, We will come again to you, shows that Abraham expected that Isaac, being raised from the dead, would return with him. It was a very affecting question that Isaac asked him, as they were going together: My father, said Isaac; it was a melting word, which, one would think, should strike deeper in the heart of Abraham, than his knife could in the heart of Isaac. Yet he waits for his son's question. Then Abraham, where he meant not, prophesies: My son, God will provide a lamb for a burnt-offering. The Holy Spirit, by his mouth, seems to predict the Lamb of God, which he has provided, and which taketh away the sin of the world. Abraham lays the wood in order for his Isaac's funeral pile, and now tells him the amazing news: Isaac, thou art the lamb which God has provided! Abraham, no doubt, comforting him with the same hopes with which he himself by faith was comforted. Yet it is necessary that the sacrifice be bound. The great Sacrifice, which, in the fulness of time, was to be offered up, must be bound, and so must Isaac. This being done, Abraham takes the knife, and stretches out his hand to give the fatal blow. Here is an act of faith and obedience, which deserves to be a spectacle to God, angels, and men. God, by his providence, calls us to part with an Isaac sometimes, and we must do it with cheerful submission to his holy will,

I would not sacrifice so much as a cockroach for this man :beatnik:

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:neener: Zoroastrianism is awesome. I don't know the finer details but I gather it preaches living a life that is 'useful' - whatever you do you have to make a positive contribution to humanity and the environment and the world etc. right till the day you die. (death ceremonies are a bit gruesome, so I'll leave those details out). It's an old religion like Hinduism and Judaism so you can't convert to it, you have to be born it.

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Oh, yeah. The Old Testament is rife with God's best foot-in-mouth moments. You know the instance where God asks old Abe to kill his son? Hahahah. I kid you not. God "tested" Abraham's faith by asking him to murder his own son.

O, I'd heard of that. But hadn't read this:

22:3-10 Never was any gold tried in so hot a fire. Who but Abraham would not have argued with God? Such would have been the thought of a weak heart; but Abraham knew that he had to do with a God, even Jehovah. Faith had taught him not to argue, but to obey. He is sure that what God commands is good; that what he promises cannot be broken. In matters of God, whoever consults with flesh and blood, will never offer up his Isaac to God. The good patriarch rises early, and begins his sad journey. And now he travels three days, and Isaac still is in his sight! Misery is made worse when long continued. The expression, We will come again to you, shows that Abraham expected that Isaac, being raised from the dead, would return with him. It was a very affecting question that Isaac asked him, as they were going together: My father, said Isaac; it was a melting word, which, one would think, should strike deeper in the heart of Abraham, than his knife could in the heart of Isaac. Yet he waits for his son's question. Then Abraham, where he meant not, prophesies: My son, God will provide a lamb for a burnt-offering. The Holy Spirit, by his mouth, seems to predict the Lamb of God, which he has provided, and which taketh away the sin of the world. Abraham lays the wood in order for his Isaac's funeral pile, and now tells him the amazing news: Isaac, thou art the lamb which God has provided! Abraham, no doubt, comforting him with the same hopes with which he himself by faith was comforted. Yet it is necessary that the sacrifice be bound. The great Sacrifice, which, in the fulness of time, was to be offered up, must be bound, and so must Isaac. This being done, Abraham takes the knife, and stretches out his hand to give the fatal blow. Here is an act of faith and obedience, which deserves to be a spectacle to God, angels, and men. God, by his providence, calls us to part with an Isaac sometimes, and we must do it with cheerful submission to his holy will,

Who does this god think he is, Julius Caesar? :shades:

Look this is all very entertaining and stuff but I find it very very amusing (and even more scary) that a) people believe this book and B) in the instance they believe it, CHOOSE TO FOLLOW IT :doh: The guy's a jerk, yo.

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Hahahah. Render unto Caesar what is Caesar's. Render unto God what is God's. I honestly can't tell the different between one tyrant despot and the other. God makes a case to even sympathise with "Satan." After all, God created Lucifer just to cast him down to Hell for eternity :beatnik:

Here is food for thought:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeSSwKffj9o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3VAEYEG53w

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It's prenatally determined, like coolness. You've got to be born with it so you either have it or don't. I'm sure you have the option of being a wannabe-Zoroastrian, tho - a poseur so to speak.

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Zoroastrianism is my favourite but no one ever, ever pays attention that :( it's a monopoly of christians and atheists I tells you :mad:

one shouldn't forget that there's no such thing as an "International Organization of Atheists" though

often it seems people think "Atheism" is a religion where the people just don't believe in a god...

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But no one calls themselves a 'non-philatelist' and adopts the term as a part of their identity the same way as 'atheist' - an atheist convention is perfectly feasible. Someone did try to organise one, I remember reading.

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Being an atheist :)

(would you call yourself a non-philatelist?)

(also, what's your take on Zoroastrianism?)

if I were to be asked for my religion, I would say "none"

(but granted, I probably wouldn't deny being an atheist)

nope, only "not a philatelist", but that's the point, no?

I haven't reached Nietzsche, but in general I'm not really a fan of theistic worldviews...

of course some parts of their philosophy might be cool, but the same goes for most other religions as well (eg "be nice to each other")

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I only refer to myself as an "atheist" to mean a variety of other things that most religious people wouldn't understand. I could just as easily say, "I'm more akin to a Animist" to which they'd seem puzzled.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism

The difference being that I don't pray to or worship anything, or have any particular rituals for it, nor do I have faith that anything was "created" or that there is a "creator" (actually, it's a fact that none of this was created), and instead of using the words "soul" and "spirit" I use "energy." It's much easier to just blurt out "atheist" or "I don't believe in it" :beatnik:

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That makes sense. In India, you'd probably better understood if you said you believed in animism, rather than claiming to be an atheist which is unheard of (and nearly impossible to achieve). Jainism has a similar principle (all living things have souls). There's another religion I like. It's like Buddhism, but I like it more.

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I have a much easier time believing in the particle-waves that make up the atoms of every thing around me, that energy only changes form and goes on for ever. Energy is all-fair/rational, non-judgmental, unbending in its nature, and unambiguous.

The only spirits I truly believe in are the sugar cane and wine spirits... good times :beatnik:

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And the stars. In fact, we are quite literally made of stardust, as the heavier molecules that make up us and our surroundings come from nebulae formed in the aftermath of supernovas. If that doesn't fill you with a profound sense of awe, I don't know what will.

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My God is a God of mercy. I often wonder how much of the Old Testament is to be taken literally. Of course, that's why there's so many different Christian Religions; people interpret it differently.

The New Testament Gospels show a Loving God who sent the message of 'do unto others as you'd like be dealt with' via His Son, Jesus. That's what Christianity is all about, or should be.

God (whatever you perceive Him to be) Bless all of you. :)

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