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Songfactor's Choice: Christmas Fantasy Wish List

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but seriously ;)

first of all :bow: :bow: :bow: for your nominations :)

I still have to read the reviews, but when something's called "Like, Omigod! The '80s Pop Culture Box (Totally)" then it already shows the high quality of the product :grin:

:jester: :jester:

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How's that related to music? And it's Christmas... surely you can ask for something more expensive? :shades: :grin:

I would like some perfume... I´ll post the one I want after I google it... :cool:

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Peachy, these kids will never know the joy of putting on a torn sweatshirt and leg warmers, cranking up Michael Sembelo's maniac, and dancing around like a, well, a maniac. Sigh. :jester:

You know I'm behind anything called"Like, Omigod! The '80s Pop Culture Box (Totally)" :thumbsup:

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Blind Melon - Letters From A Porcupine

Letters From A Porcupine is a song that was never formally recorded by Blind Melon. Shannon Hoon played it over the phone to guitarist Christopher Thorn's answering machine. And that is the way it appears on their last album, Nico.

As for this DVD:

This posthumous tribute to Blind Melon documents the band's ascendancy to the top of the charts, including extensive footage of live club performances, their set at Woodstock '94, late-night television appearances, and behind-the-scenes footage of the recording sessions for their final album. Songs include "Soup," "Toes Across the Floor," "St. Andrews Hall," "Soul One" and "No Rain (Ripped Away Version)." 83 minutes.

They were such a talented group of people and listening to their last recordings is so painful because you see what they were capable of. I'd love to have this DVD if only to convince myself further that this is a vastly underrated band

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The more deluxe version features lobby cards and a script recreation, but the actual DVD features are the same, so even the less expensive version is a great deal.

I have the 40th Anniversary A Hard Days Night with loads of bonus features, so I think this version of Help! is definitly worth the purchase.

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*cough cough*

Peaches... thank you my dear, you have done yourself proud!! Your nominations are exquisite! In fact, all the nominations are exquisite. It's a good thing this is a Fantasy Wish List! Just think, we get to choose 5! :)

I'm busily checking for a second one... ;)

It's $150 though, so the only way I'm getting it is as a present. :P

And that Tim, is the beauty of Fantasy ... ;)

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For me, Frank Sinatra was at his creative peak during his period with Capitol Records from 1953 ---> 1961.

His trademark was finding the best songs from the golden era of songwriting... the 1920's, '30s and '40s. Composers like Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter and George Gershwin. He would hire the best arrangers like Axel Stordahl, Nelson Riddle, Gordon Jenkins and Billy May.

His style of interpretation of American Popular Song led to a whole new generation of listeners that dug all those old classics the way he would sing 'em.

He was one of the first performers to have a theme running throughout a whole album. A concept album.

During his stay at Capitol (1953 - 1961) he released 12 albums that are cream of the crop = 5 stars.

They are:

Swing Easy! (1954)

In The Wee Small Hours (1955)

Songs For Swingin' Lovers! (1956)

A Swingin' Affair! (1957)

Close To You And More (1957)

Where Are You ? (1957)

Come Fly With Me (1958)

Come Dance With Me! (1958)

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only The Lonely (1958)

No One Cares (1959)

Nice 'N' Easy (1960)

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! And More (1961)

They're all here in this 21 cd box set called The Capitol Years ... every Sinatra cut released on Capitol Records from 1953 - 1961.

This is on my Christmas Wish List... :bow:

Sinatracapitol98.jpg

:cool:

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Donovan-A_Gift_from_a_Flower_to_a_Garden

At the top of my Christmas Wish List is the original vinyl double LP by Donovan: A Gift from a Flower to a Garden, one of the first box sets in rock history. It came in a beautiful package containing twelve inserts for the twelve songs on the second record. Each is a slightly different colour and has the lyrics with a drawing illustrating the song. Every one is a beautiful interpretation of Donovan's poetry.

Track list (favourite songs in red):

Side 1

Wear Your Love Like Heaven (Version I) (2.26)

Mad John's Escape (2.16)

Skip-a-long Sam (2.23)

Sun (3.13)

There was a Time (1.59)

Side 2

Oh Gosh (1.42)

Little Boy in Corduroy (2.33)

Under the Greenwood Tree (1.53)

[words by William Shakespeare/music by Donovan Leitch]

The Land of Doesn't Have to be (2.32)

Someone Singing (2.44)

Side 3

Song of the Naturalist's Wife (2.50)

The Enchanted Gypsy (3.15)

Voyage into the Golden Screen (3.10)

Isle of Islay (Version I) (2.20)

The Mandolin Man and his Secret (3.28)

Lay of the Last Tinker (1.45)

Side 4

The Tinker and the Crab (2.50)

Widow with Shawl (A Portrait) (Version I) (2.57)

The Lullaby of Spring (Version I) (3.22)

The Magpie (1.26)

Starfish-on-the-toast (2.38)

Epistle to Derroll (5.42)

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Oh Dappled, nice! I'd love to have that! :)

If you haven't already done so, get your wish in here to us within the next few days. We haven't got the time for voting figured out exactly, because of the Thanksgiving Holiday, but it'll be coming up soon! :)

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As many of you know from one of my threads, I collect rock posters.

BG134-PO.jpg

Well, I still haven't found the money to buy this work of art and it's still # 1 on my rock poster wish list.

It's called BG 134 from the Bill Graham Series.

Santana was so taken by the poster they asked the artist, Lee Conklin to redraw the picture for their first album cover and the rest is history.

Performers:

Steppenwolf

The Staple Singers

Santana

Grateful Dead

Preservation Hall Jazz Band

The Sons of Champlin

Holy See

Artist:Lee Conklin

Date:Aug 27, 1968

Venue:Fillmore West(San Francisco, CA)

Size:14 1/8" x 21"

first printing - $ 1450

second printing - $ 415

third printing - $ 175

I'd settle for a second or third printing. ;)

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A couple of autobiographies from guitar guys that I'd love to have if I thought I'd have time to read them eusa_shifty.gif

51IjUCFolnL_AA240_.jpg

From Amazon:

He was born in England but reared in L.A., surrounded by the leading artists of the day amidst the vibrant hotbed of music and culture that was the early seventies. Slash spent his adolescence on the streets of Hollywood, discovering drugs, drinking, rock music, and girls, all while achieving notable status as a BMX rider. But everything changed in his world the day he first held the beat-up one-string guitar his grandmother had discarded in a closet.

The instrument became his voice and it triggered a lifelong passion that made everything else irrelevant. As soon as he could string chords and a solo together, Slash wanted to be in a band and sought out friends with similar interests. His closest friend, Steven Adler, proved to be a conspirator for the long haul. As hairmetal bands exploded onto the L.A. scene and topped the charts, Slash sought his niche and a band that suited his raw and gritty sensibility.

31Re2J9O2BXL_AA240_.jpg

Also, from Amazon:

With striking intimacy and candor, Eric Clapton tells the story of his eventful and inspiring life in this poignant and honest autobiography. More than a rock star, he is an icon, a living embodiment of the history of rock music. Well known for his reserve in a profession marked by self-promotion, flamboyance, and spin, he now chronicles, for the first time, his remarkable personal and professional journeys.

Born illegitimate in 1945 and raised by his grandparents, Eric never knew his father and, until the age of nine, believed his actual mother to be his sister. In his early teens his solace was the guitar, and his incredible talent would make him a cult hero in the clubs of Britain and inspire devoted fans to scrawl “Clapton is God†on the walls of London’s Underground. With the formation of Cream, the world's first supergroup, he became a worldwide superstar, but conflicting personalities tore the band apart within two years. His stints in Blind Faith, in Delaney and Bonnie and Friends, and in Derek and the Dominos were also short-lived but yielded some of the most enduring songs in history, including the classic “Layla.â€

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